The $10 Prepper - 1911Forum
1911Forum
Advertise Here
Forum   Reviews   Rules   Legal   Site Supporters & Donations   Advertise


Go Back   1911Forum > >

Notices


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 06-09-2019, 07:12 PM
John Joseph John Joseph is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 1,760
The $10 Prepper

What will $5 supply?

A bottle of generic aspirin
Witch Hazel wipes
a roll of wire
A ball of twine
A Sharpie pen
A box of sandwich size baggies
Cheap pliers
A couple of vinyl rain ponchos
A few p-38 can openers
Boxes of wooden matches
Soap
Toothpaste
Instant oatmeal or Cream of Wheat
A 5 gallon plastic bucket

What will $10 get you?

At least 10 gallons of bottled water
Two cases of ramen noodles
A cheap two D cell flashlight
A hank of paracord
A blue plastic tarp
A 5 round box of 00 buck
A box, maybe two, of .22lrs
A large jar of peanut butter
A fusee railroad/highway flare
Plumber's candles
AS set of screwdrivers

Kick it up to $20 and...

A fishing combo (pole, spinning reel and line) from someplace like Walmart
A battery operated transistor radio
A box of .45acp ball ammo
A cheap knife
A small cast iron frying pan
A case or three of canned vegetables from a warehouse type store
A shovel
A bow saw


What low bucks prepping items could you add for those who want to start prepping with a minimum investment?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 06-09-2019, 07:31 PM
Akbowman Akbowman is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Alaska
Posts: 175
A pocket sized fishing kit including line, hooks, sinkers, and bobber
Couple tins of altoids, great for holding the above fishing kit, or making char cloth (after removing said altoids)
Fire starters-magnesium, or small ferro rod, fatwood (if you can’t find yourself)
Datrex bars, don’t taste great but will keep you alive and easy to store
Large contractor trash bags-all kinds of uses
Check garage sales for a hatchet
__________________
Criminals prefer unarmed victims. Dictators prefer unarmed citizens. Member-NRA, GOA, FNRA, FPC, SAF, NAGR, and USN vet.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 06-09-2019, 08:12 PM
The War Wagon The War Wagon is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: da' 'BURGH
Age: 53
Posts: 2,801
Thumbs up

Good post & great thread. If you're po', ya' gotta start SOMEWHERE!
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #4  
Old 06-09-2019, 10:57 PM
John Joseph John Joseph is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 1,760
Cruise yard/estate or going out of business sales for a set of good heavy shelving, or use cement blocks and planks to build your own, for organizing your emergency supplies.
Use for storing bottled water and canned/instant food/ramen----put food in Rubbermaid or Sterlite plastic tubs with tight fitting lids for added protection. A camp stove and lantern as well.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 06-10-2019, 08:07 AM
steviesterno steviesterno is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 1,897
nothing wrong with starting small and building your way up. When I lived in Florida as a broke college kid I put a hurricane kit together in a tupperware tub. Mostly store brand canned pasta meals, bottled water, cheap LED flashlight, used pocket knife, candy bars, and a bottle of rum. It was enough to get me through some storms, I'd eat everything as regular groceries at the end of the season and replace the next spring. good system. I'm much better prepared now but still a solid start.

My suggestion is don't be put off by adding slowly and when you find deals, have extra money, etc. I went from that kid with very little to now. I used to feel under-prepped, but now i have a "bug out" land cruiser, generators, stores of gas, months of food, water collection, piles of ammo, etc. Just keep going.

It's like eating an elephant.... One bite at a time.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 06-10-2019, 04:54 PM
HarryO45 HarryO45 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Home of the Infantry
Posts: 4,919
Maybe add:

A plastic Army whistle.

Re-roll duct tape on a short wooden dowl (to make it compact)

A few zip ties

Motrin

And always have a Condom
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 06-10-2019, 05:41 PM
scubadad scubadad is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 3,356
Quote:
Originally Posted by HarryO45 View Post
Maybe add:


And always have a Condom
You could have told me that BEFORE I had 4 kids.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 06-10-2019, 09:16 PM
sambob sambob is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 154
should have figured It out after the first one
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 06-10-2019, 09:20 PM
John Joseph John Joseph is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 1,760
A road map
An Army canteen
A compass
Mosquito repellent
A pair of work gloves
An 8" mill bastard file for sharpening

If there is space, a sapling dwarf nut tree will keep you in high protein nuts after maturity (about 3 years) and the nuts can be stored a long time.
Add a dwarf citrus tree if the climate is agreeable for vitamin C.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 06-11-2019, 10:52 PM
John Joseph John Joseph is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 1,760
A roll of piano wire for making snares
A gill net
a signal mirror
(these were, maybe still are part of the required survival gear when flying aircraft in Alaska!)
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 06-12-2019, 08:32 AM
Thumper88 Thumper88 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2019
Posts: 51
If I missed it I apologize, but heirloom seeds are always good. They can be found fairly cheap, long term storage is easy. Even better, start growing a small garden now. That way you learn the ins and outs and can can your own food, saving money on food storage and prepping
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 06-12-2019, 11:47 AM
USMM guy USMM guy is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Rural VA
Posts: 22,214
Those survival seed packets make my wife and I laugh.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thumper88 View Post
If I missed it I apologize, but heirloom seeds are always good. They can be found fairly cheap, long term storage is easy. Even better, start growing a small garden now. That way you learn the ins and outs and can can your own food, saving money on food storage and prepping
My wife and I have been growing the balance of our own food for years. Anybody with no experience that thinks they are going to take a bunch of seeds and plant them in the ground and grow themselves a bunch of food just like that. They are going to get pretty hungry in very short order.

Soil preparation takes a long time and a lot of work. Proper fertilization and culling takes knowledge. Timing of planting is critical. Distance between plants is very important. Pest control is difficult. And there are a number of other things involved that most people have no clue about.

If I had ten bucks to spend on prepping items. I would likely just buy a half a dozen cans of Spam.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 06-12-2019, 11:58 AM
Thumper88 Thumper88 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2019
Posts: 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by USMM guy View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thumper88 View Post
If I missed it I apologize, but heirloom seeds are always good. They can be found fairly cheap, long term storage is easy. Even better, start growing a small garden now. That way you learn the ins and outs and can can your own food, saving money on food storage and prepping
My wife and I have been growing the balance of our own food for years. Anybody with no experience that thinks they are going to take a bunch of seeds and plant them in the ground and grow themselves a bunch of food just like that. They are going to get pretty hungry in very short order.

Soil preparation takes a long time and a lot of work. Proper fertilization and culling takes knowledge. Timing of planting is critical. Distance between plants is very important. Pest control is difficult. And there are a number of other things involved that most people have no clue about.

If I had ten bucks to spend on prepping items. I would likely just buy a half a dozen cans of Spam.
I have no experience with the seed kits, so can’t speak to those. I’m talking about buying packs of seeds at a local coop or farm store. And that was why I also suggested starting a small garden now. Depending on the garden and location, fertilization and pest control may not be major issues. I rotate every year and rarely fertilize more than using horse manure over the winter. As far as pest control, the most we have ever done is use seven dust if it gets to bad. Beyond that we don’t do much. We are way beyond what most would consider normal though ffrom a preparation stand point. We have a tractor but most of the time we use our draft horses for plowing and farm work. And we don’t do little gardens much, our vegetable patch is right at an acre, and we did about 3 acres of corn this year. But prepping has to start somewhere, and a package of heirloom tomatoe seeds and just a little bit of research would have much higher yield than a $1 can of spam. We finally started getting a few things this past weekend. I’m just glad to have fresh tomatoes again.
Attached Thumbnails
B5930CA5-B2F2-403A-B210-F5D2D04A33A2_1560358642898.jpeg   1C2D696B-DAFE-40B1-8B8C-D9248D2FD739_1560358653456.jpeg   2ADAB790-12F8-448B-A6AF-C34FA0CE92F0_1560358667061.jpeg  
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 06-12-2019, 01:08 PM
USMM guy USMM guy is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Rural VA
Posts: 22,214
Precisely my point.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thumper88 View Post
I have no experience with the seed kits, so can’t speak to those. I’m talking about buying packs of seeds at a local coop or farm store. And that was why I also suggested starting a small garden now. Depending on the garden and location, fertilization and pest control may not be major issues. I rotate every year and rarely fertilize more than using horse manure over the winter. As far as pest control, the most we have ever done is use seven dust if it gets to bad. Beyond that we don’t do much. We are way beyond what most would consider normal though ffrom a preparation stand point. We have a tractor but most of the time we use our draft horses for plowing and farm work. And we don’t do little gardens much, our vegetable patch is right at an acre, and we did about 3 acres of corn this year. But prepping has to start somewhere, and a package of heirloom tomatoe seeds and just a little bit of research would have much higher yield than a $1 can of spam. We finally started getting a few things this past weekend. I’m just glad to have fresh tomatoes again.
That you have to know what you are doing to get anything out of a bag of seeds, which you obviously do. But most people with no experience in growing food will not have much luck. So far this spring we have gotten in the Strawberries, Garlic, Shallots, and are starting to get in the Potatoes. Likely will not be putting any Tomatoes on the table for at least a couple of more weeks. Virginia soil is generally pretty good. But our three thousand feet of elevation does make a difference.

I read you loud and clear about starting a garden now. It was two seasons before we were able to make our raised beds really productive. And certainly agree that rotation is very important.

Are your horses Percherons?

Last edited by USMM guy; 06-12-2019 at 01:20 PM. Reason: Added additional comments.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 06-12-2019, 01:43 PM
Thumper88 Thumper88 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2019
Posts: 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by USMM guy View Post

I read you loud and clear about starting a garden now. It was two seasons before we were able to make our raised beds really productive. And certainly agree that rotation is very important.

Are your horses Percherons?
They are Belgians. We had a beautiful Percheron that my dad bought when he (the horse) was 2. He lived to be 33 before he passed.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 06-25-2019, 06:38 PM
Sailormilan2 Sailormilan2 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Behind the lines in Occupied Central CA
Posts: 996
not sure if you are talking about a one purchase of $10, or repeat purchase.
This site has a suggestion for building a food supply for $5 a week. But the article is old enough it's probably closer to $10 a week now.
https://www.offthegridnews.com/off-g...as-5-per-week/
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 08-16-2019, 01:04 AM
1911crazy 1911crazy is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: usa
Posts: 4,556
My garden is fertile. Ready to grow anything.

Homemade pasta
Canned tomato sauce
Canned meat or pork for sauce
Cheese
Wild game chili
Pancake mix by the 10 lb bag
Canned butter
Maple syrup
Flour and yeast for making bread. Dried butter milk for fresh pancakes.
Canned beef for stew
Canned veggies for stew
Spam
Canned bacon.
Slab bacon just wash off the mold.
Pepperoni wash it or remove the skin
Water
Toilet paper brings up the rear.
__________________
Ask yourself is what i'm about to do SAFE???? (From the national timber fellers association)

Gun Safety never sleeps or takes a day off, be safe do it right......

Last edited by 1911crazy; 08-16-2019 at 01:08 AM.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:26 PM.


NOTICE TO USERS OF THIS SITE: By continuing to use this site, you certify that you have read and agree to abide by the Legal Terms of Use. All information, data, text or other materials ("Content") posted to this site by any users are the sole responsibility of those users. 1911Forum does not guarantee the accuracy, integrity, or quality of such Content.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 2015 1911Forum.com, LLC. All Rights Reserved