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  #1  
Old 03-03-2019, 08:05 PM
Black Jack Black Jack is offline
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Dillon RL 550C

Well, I went ahead and picked up a Dillon RL 550C this morning and got it setup this afternoon. I got everything setup except the powder charge. The powder measure and the dies are all setup, but I have not put any powder into it yet to set the charge.

Since I know that there is a pretty good blue crowd here, I wanted to throw out a couple of questions before I load my first batch of 9mm tomorrow.

1. the Fail-Safe Rod for the powder measure is canted at an angle from left to right, bottom to top. The picture that Dillon calls out as an example in their setup guide shows the Fail-Safe Rod straight up and down. But they also say that when you hang it from the powder measure, before connecting it to the Return Bracket, it should hang in "close proximity to the Return Bracket". Well, it did hang right in front of the notch in the bracket and it "seems" to work (I guess I will find out for sure tomorrow). When I tried adjusting the powder measure so that it did hang straight up and down, like the picture, it did not want to return the powder bar back to its original position, so I set it back to where it seemed to want to be.

Does this sound right?

2. is there anything that I need to do to the powder measure before putting powder in it? I know that some manufacturers recommend cleaning, but Dillon's setup guide does not say anything about it.

3. The setup guide said to adjust the retaining spring in station 1 so that it "almost" touches the case after it is in the shell plate. Well, I did that and the case does push the spring out of the way as I am inserting it into the shell plate and does not quite touch once the case is in the shell plate. The issue I am seeing is that sometimes the spring does not want to move out of the way and the case ends up slipping on top of the spring and does not go into the shell plate. Does this sound like I have it adjusted wrong, or is it just something that I am going to have to get used to working with?

In general, my initial impressions, after having set it up and run a few dummy cases through it, are positive. I like what I see so far. I am planning on starting out with 100 round batch of 9mm tomorrow, at a rather slow pace, to get the powder drop adjusted and verify the die settings I did today.

Thanks.
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  #2  
Old 03-03-2019, 09:45 PM
flyrobb flyrobb is offline
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same issues here

Black Jack,
1) I just set up a used 550b recently and had the exact same question regarding the fail safe rod. Setting it up straight definitely puts in in a bind and scrapes the white plastic shoulder washer on the threads at the bottom of the rod. I just loosened the powder measurer on the powder die and adjusted it until it moved up and down the rod freeley. I went to a Dillon dealer in Loveland and looked at theirs and it was not straight either.

2) The only thing I did was run a dryer sheet in and round it to get rid of the static. Other that that should be good to go.

3) Again, just a little trial and error here for me. Put a shell in and adjusted the spring until it moves out of the way and holds the shell in place. Sounds like you may have it adjusted a bit tight on the case.

Now, full disclosure, I have loaded about 200 rounds on mine so I am a rookie on the 550 but my questions were same as your. I loaded on a single stage for 5 years prior to getting the 550 and after getting used to it I am really liking it. I am taking it very slow and it took 15 minutes to load 50 rounds of 9mm last night. I visually check the powder drop in every round for now, and will probably continue doing so.

Good luck with the new Dillon. What part of CO you in? I'm up North by Ft. C.
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  #3  
Old 03-03-2019, 10:03 PM
Oldfut808 Oldfut808 is offline
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I don't own a 550, but I got plenty other Dillon presses. A little advice....

I would run the press in single shot mode until you memorize exactly what each station does.

When you get a jam or experience a sudden increase in handle pressure, remove all the shells and start all over again.
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  #4  
Old 03-04-2019, 04:47 AM
Rwehavinfunyet Rwehavinfunyet is offline
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New Dillon 550C

If you have more questions, the Dillon tech support team is very good, and willing to help! It is important to set up the press and the dies correctly so you start making good reloads.....

When loading 9mm cases, it is important the resizing die swages/resizes the brass properly. I have heard of resizing dies that are out of spec. If the brass is not resized properly, and you use .355" jacketed bullets, there may not be enough case neck tension on the bullet to prevent "bullet set back" when the round feeds in your gun.

When you make and complete your first 9mm round, place the tip of the bullet nose against a hard immovable surface, like your reloading bench, and push the back of the brass case head hard against the bench..... If the bullet does not move into the case, you are good to go. If the bullet does move, you may have an out of spec resizing die, or the die with the neck expander may be opening the case mouth too wide......I have had to take a neck expander and chuck it in my drill press and use emery paper to slightly reduce the diameter to create better case neck tension...…

Hopefully, you won't have any issues, and you will be cranking out good 9mm ammo!
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  #5  
Old 03-04-2019, 01:02 PM
Black Jack Black Jack is offline
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Originally Posted by flyrobb View Post

Good luck with the new Dillon. What part of CO you in? I'm up North by Ft. C.
I'm in Broomfield, about half way between Denver and Boulder. Depending on traffic, about an hour from you.
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  #6  
Old 03-04-2019, 01:08 PM
Black Jack Black Jack is offline
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First hundred rounds…

First comment – SWEET!

First, I adjusted the Retention Spring in station 1, like flyrobb suggested, and that solved my occasional problem with feeding brass into station 1.

It did take me longer to adjust the powder drop that I had expected, but I think that was my scale more than the powder measure – it seems to be sticking sometimes, I will need to take it apart and clean it (it is a balance beam and lives in a drawer). As for the Powder Feed Fail-Safe Rod… even though it is not straight, I had no problems with it whatsoever. I did check and verify the powder charge a couple of times throughout 100 rounds and found it to be right on without any “drift” at all.

I also had to make a small adjustment to the seating/crimp die (I am using my RCBS dies with seating and crimping in the same station). But once these two things were taken care of, I had no issues with the press.

Unfortunately, I can’t say the same thing about myself! Can see that it will take me a little bit to get used to this press. Coming from the Lee Classic Turret press, with auto indexing, I find the manual indexing to be “different”. Not bad, just “different”. I found myself continually reaching for another empty case, even after I had already put one into station 1! It is just going to take me a bit to get used to the fact that I am taking my hand off the handle. Until I do get used to that, I expect to find myself unconsciously reaching for things at random.

I also found myself continually reaching for the handle, a good 5 or 6 inches above the top of the handle. I think this was because the primer feed magazine was sitting right there at the edge of my vision and, not being used to this kind of a primer feed system, I was subconsciously reaching for it instead of the handle.

After finishing, I plunk tested all 100 rounds and measured the COAL on randomly selected rounds. Everything looked good and was very consistent.

I sit down while loading and with this press mounted on my bench, no Strong Mount, the middle of the powder hopper is right at my eye level. The handle, from the top of the stroke all the way down to the bottom of the stroke, is very comfortable. I sit just off to the left of the press which puts me in a perfect position to visually check the powder charge before placing a bullet into the case mouth. All-in-all, a very comfortable press for me to operate.

As far as production goes... I found it to be interesting because it “felt like I was going slower than I do on the Lee Classic Turret press. I didn’t time myself, although I will eventually do that after I get more comfortable with this press, but just based on knowing about what time I started and about what time I finished 100 rounds, I know that I was going substantially faster than I do on the turret press. I think that what made it feel like I was going slower was continually taking my right hand off the handle. With both the single stage (I started out on an RCBS Rock Chucker) and the turret press, I keep my right hand on the handle and handle all of the components with my left. It just makes it feel like I am going slower than I know that I am.

As I said, it will take me a bit to get used to this press, but I am already very happy with it and how it works. I think it will be a great press for me.

Last edited by Black Jack; 03-04-2019 at 01:12 PM.
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  #7  
Old 03-04-2019, 10:06 PM
flyrobb flyrobb is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Black Jack View Post
First hundred rounds…

I sit down while loading and with this press mounted on my bench, no Strong Mount, the middle of the powder hopper is right at my eye level. The handle, from the top of the stroke all the way down to the bottom of the stroke, is very comfortable. I sit just off to the left of the press which puts me in a perfect position to visually check the powder charge before placing a bullet into the case mouth. All-in-all, a very comfortable press for me to operate.

As far as production goes...

As I said, it will take me a bit to get used to this press, but I am already very happy with it and how it works. I think it will be a great press for me.
I'm set up exactly the same as you. I also feel production is pretty slow but in comparison to the single stage it is way quicker and I now it will get better as I get used to the machine. Anyway the goal is good quality at a reasonable rate as I don't need to crank out hundreds of rounds at a time to keep up with my shooting needs.

You said you seat and crimp in the same step. What are you doing with the extra station? I seat and crimp in separate steps so all stations are full.
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  #8  
Old 03-05-2019, 06:24 AM
Nitro.45 Nitro.45 is offline
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Bingo, Black Jack you really want to seat and crimp in separate stations. I know, you have it set up correctly....for now. Changes in brass length can really mess that system up. It is far easier to add a little more crimp or seat a little bit deeper with two separate dies that you adjust individually. It makes it a lot smoother too!
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Old 03-05-2019, 09:58 AM
Oldfut808 Oldfut808 is offline
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Originally Posted by Nitro.45 View Post
Bingo, Black Jack you really want to seat and crimp in separate stations. I know, you have it set up correctly....for now. Changes in brass length can really mess that system up. It is far easier to add a little more crimp or seat a little bit deeper with two separate dies that you adjust individually. It makes it a lot smoother too!
...
^^^highly recommend separate taper crimp die^^^
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  #10  
Old 03-05-2019, 11:02 AM
Black Jack Black Jack is offline
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I do seat and crimp in separate stations for rifle, but have always seated and crimped in the same station for pistol. I have thought about it, I just do not know whether I want to get a Factory Crimp Die, or just pull the seating stem out of the Seating/Crimp die I have that is still setup on the turret tool head. On one hand, I hate to pull the stem out and use that one because it would mean that the entire set of dies becomes useless. On the other hand, the idea is to migrate from the turret press to the 550 so I really do not need to keep a tool head setup for 9mm on the turret. Even though I do not see myself using it, I just hate to have an incomplete set of dies.

As for the 4th station… right now it is empty. When, and if, I move to crimping in a separate station, that will fill it. The only other thing I could think of would be to put a powder check die in station 3 and move seating/crimping to station 4, but I think I would prefer to add a separate station for crimping rather than putting in a powder check die. I am already in a good position to visually check the powder in the case before placing a bullet into the case mouth and I really like consistency in my reloading between calibers. Since I do not have a 5th station to add a powder check die for rifle, I do not really want to add one for my pistol calibers, it would just add a level of inconsistency between reloading for rifle and reloading for pistol. Maybe it is all psychological, or maybe I have a touch of OCD , but for me it is all about consistency in the operation of the press. I do not want it to operate one way for one caliber and another way for another caliber.

I also called Dillon about the Powder Measure Fail-Safe Rod yesterday and they said to bend the top of it so that it was a 90* angle and it did hang straight down when installed. They said it would make a difference, although they didn’t say what the difference would be. They also said not to worry about “buggering it up”, that they would send me a new one if I did. So I went ahead and pulled out a pair of channel locks and a heavy duty pair of needle nosed pliers and bent it to a 90* angle. It now hangs straight down when installed. I do not see much, if any, difference in operation, but the white plastic bushing does slip into, and out of, the Return Bracket much more easily.

The other thing I did was to take a set of primer pickup tubes that I already had and put the extra plastic ends that came with the press on them. Well, I found that this was not a great idea. They were so tight that they would not fit on all the way and now I can’t get them off without breaking them. Not a big deal, these tubes did not come with plastic ends anyway and I don’t really think I need them (the tubes have holes in them for the retaining clips in the body of the tubes themselves), but I hate the idea of having to break them off. Well, lesson learned. I will be getting an additional set of tubes when I get my next conversion kit anyway, this will give me 6 Dillon tubes (3 large and 3 small) plus this extra set that I had lying around. I figure that having 4 of each size should be more than enough for me.
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Old 03-05-2019, 12:30 PM
rodspade rodspade is offline
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The Brian Enos forum is a good resource for Dillon owners:
https://forums.brianenos.com/forum/7...ing-equipment/
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  #12  
Old 03-05-2019, 12:33 PM
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Tom Freeman Tom Freeman is offline
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For pistol always crimp and seat in separate steps if you can.

With a Dillon progressive, it is painless.
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Old 03-05-2019, 06:43 PM
flyrobb flyrobb is offline
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If you don't want to break up a set of dies just buy a single Seat/crimp die (doesn't need to be a LFCD)and pull the stem out and you'll have your 4th station and your other set will be in tack. If you're visually checking each powder charge don't really need a powder check die.

That's interesting Dillon recommended bending the fail safe rod. Seems if it needs bending they would design that into the press in the first place. I'm a bit confused where you bent the rod. The rod currently has a double bend in it at the top. Did you bend it at the first crook in the rod?
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Old 03-05-2019, 10:39 PM
Black Jack Black Jack is offline
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That's interesting Dillon recommended bending the fail safe rod. Seems if it needs bending they would design that into the press in the first place. I'm a bit confused where you bent the rod. The rod currently has a double bend in it at the top. Did you bend it at the first crook in the rod?
Starting at the bottom of the rod, the first bend is the one they had me bend a bit more. It makes the horizontal portion of the rod that rides through the two holes 90* from the longer section that goes down to the bracket.

The first thing he did was to make sure that i was putting the rod through the elongated hole first and then through to round hole, to verify that I was installing it in the right direction. Then he had me bend it so that the bend on the same sire as the elongated hole was at a 90* angle. This allows the rod to hang straight down after it is installed (it will be at a slight angle before you put the white bushing into the bracket).

Hope I am doing a good enough job of explaining it.
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Old 03-06-2019, 06:11 AM
Rwehavinfunyet Rwehavinfunyet is offline
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reloading on a D550

You may have figured out the best way to reload using a D550, but IMHO, it is best to use both hands to speed up the reloading process. I also sit down when I reload. I keep the cleaned brass and the bullets in trays that are elevated and close to the press.....which prevents unnecessary reaching for the components.

When I have a clean case inserted in the shell plate, I pull the ram handle down with my right hand/arm, and bump the handle forward to seat the primer. I then turn the shell plate with my left hand thumb, then grab a bullet with my left hand. As I place the bullet on the primed case, I reach for another brass case with my right hand, and index the shell plate with my left hand thumb, then reach for another bullet...….even with a bullet in my left hand, it is still very easy to turn the shell plate by holding a bullet and using my left hand thumb. Once you get in a rhythm, ......it will become instinctual without needing to think...…..

It takes me about 15 minutes to load 100 rounds when the press is set up with primers in the tube. I do not reload fast, and keep an awareness of the amount of force required on the ram handle. If there seems to be more effort to pull the ram handle down, something is usually wrong, and I stop. I then remove all brass from the shell plate to figure out the issue.

One thing I do is make my own decapping pins using the steel post of pop rivets....which are close to the actual diameter of a decapping pin. I like an extra long decapping pin, which extends about 1/2" below the bottom of the resizing die. If I run across a Berdan primed case, the extra long pin will force me to stop, and prevents any powder from dropping in a primed case
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Old 03-06-2019, 06:12 AM
Nitro.45 Nitro.45 is offline
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Back to the seating die thing. Just buy another set of carbide dies, the 4 die variety. Believe me, you will always want to use your turret set up for test loads etc...nothing hurt by keeping it intact. One of the biggest contributors to buggered up brass and shaved lead is seating and crimping in the same step. With that said, I realize there are a few others on this forum that do it as well. It is not “wrong”, and they have managed to get by just fine over the years. I used to try to roll crimp and seat in the same step, that’s borderline at best. It was a new day when I pulled my head out. Of course that was decades ago and I was screwing with a Loadmaster that couldn’t make a set of Redding Competition Dies work. Believe me, it does make a difference. It’s not worth the potential agony for not spending $75.
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Old 03-06-2019, 08:37 AM
Black Jack Black Jack is offline
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Originally Posted by Rwehavinfunyet View Post
You may have figured out the best way to reload using a D550, but IMHO, it is best to use both hands to speed up the reloading process. I also sit down when I reload. I keep the cleaned brass and the bullets in trays that are elevated and close to the press.....which prevents unnecessary reaching for the components.

When I have a clean case inserted in the shell plate, I pull the ram handle down with my right hand/arm, and bump the handle forward to seat the primer. I then turn the shell plate with my left hand thumb, then grab a bullet with my left hand. As I place the bullet on the primed case, I reach for another brass case with my right hand, and index the shell plate with my left hand thumb, then reach for another bullet...….even with a bullet in my left hand, it is still very easy to turn the shell plate by holding a bullet and using my left hand thumb. Once you get in a rhythm, ......it will become instinctual without needing to think...…..

It takes me about 15 minutes to load 100 rounds when the press is set up with primers in the tube. I do not reload fast, and keep an awareness of the amount of force required on the ram handle. If there seems to be more effort to pull the ram handle down, something is usually wrong, and I stop. I then remove all brass from the shell plate to figure out the issue.

One thing I do is make my own decapping pins using the steel post of pop rivets....which are close to the actual diameter of a decapping pin. I like an extra long decapping pin, which extends about 1/2" below the bottom of the resizing die. If I run across a Berdan primed case, the extra long pin will force me to stop, and prevents any powder from dropping in a primed case
Yup, the process that you described is exactly what I do. It is just taking me a bit to get used to it. On the turret press everything was done from the left hand side of the press so I am used to keeping my right hand on the handle. Can't do that with the 550 because the brass is loaded from the right.

So far I have loaded 200 rounds on the 550 and am already getting comfortable with it. The only issues I have encountered so far were a few cases with crimped primers that I had missed, and that is on me, not the press. Since I review the brass before cleaning, when I am sorting, and after cleaning, I should have caught these.
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Old 03-06-2019, 09:26 AM
Black Jack Black Jack is offline
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Originally Posted by Nitro.45 View Post
Back to the seating die thing. Just buy another set of carbide dies, the 4 die variety. Believe me, you will always want to use your turret set up for test loads etc...nothing hurt by keeping it intact. One of the biggest contributors to buggered up brass and shaved lead is seating and crimping in the same step. With that said, I realize there are a few others on this forum that do it as well. It is not “wrong”, and they have managed to get by just fine over the years. I used to try to roll crimp and seat in the same step, that’s borderline at best. It was a new day when I pulled my head out. Of course that was decades ago and I was screwing with a Loadmaster that couldn’t make a set of Redding Competition Dies work. Believe me, it does make a difference. It’s not worth the potential agony for not spending $75.
Yup,it looks like I will be getting a separate crimp die. I already have two sets of dies, one RCBS that is setup on the 550 and one Lee that was setup on the turret press, until last night. I tried setting the RCBS die for just seating and the Lee for just crimp last night but was not happy with the results. I am going back to seating and crimping on the RCBS die until i have a chance to pickup a dedicated crimp die and will setup the Lee dies back on the turret head.

As you said, there is nothing wrong with leaving the turret setup. It will be a while before I am completely transitioned with all of my calibers to the 550 anyway so I will just leave the turret press and its associated dies sets setup until I have everything on the 550. Then I will need to decide whether to keep the turret press or sell it off. If I keep it, I will probably keep at least my major calibers setup on it.
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Old 03-07-2019, 02:39 PM
mattc51 mattc51 is offline
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There are some setup tips and improvements on uniquetech that will help you get the most out of your dillon powder measure. Check it out and see how much better the consistency gets with powder throws.
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Old 03-08-2019, 05:54 PM
45 NHFarmer 45 NHFarmer is offline
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individual dies....

Individual used dies can usually picked up on eBay for the 'right' price.
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Old 03-08-2019, 06:44 PM
trooper894 trooper894 is offline
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Before you damage the plastic primer pickup tips to get them off the tubes, try applying just a little heat from either a blow dryer or heat gun. That may allow the plastic to expand enough that they can be removed without damage. I've had my 550B for over 20 years and love the manual advance as it gives me more control of the process, especially when there is a problem, it simplifies clearing the problem round. Only problem I ever had was from me over tightening the (2) primer assembly bolts. I was getting primers flipping over, hanging up and failures to feed and it was driving me nuts. After looking everything over the setup from beginning to end & knowing my tendency to over tighten things I figured out where I was screwing up. Completely from me using too much umph.
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Old 03-08-2019, 07:49 PM
Black Jack Black Jack is offline
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Completely from me using too much umph.
Sounds like something I would do .
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Old 03-10-2019, 05:53 AM
Tensaw Tensaw is offline
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I bought a 550C back in November to reload 9mm and .45acp. I too had been using a turret press with RCBS dies. It took me 3 or 4 loading sessions to get "coordinated" in running the press. I experimented to find a sequence of hand movements that was efficient and comfortable at the same time. The idea for me is to run the press smoothly and not try to run it fast. I am now able to load about 325 to 350 rounds an hour and I do not feel at all like I'm in a rush. I spot check charge weights and COL and it's amazing how consistent they are. I thought I would use the RCBS dies and honestly never saw the advantage in seating/crimping separately. But I went ahead and got the Dillon dies and I'm glad I did. I think the larger radius opening helps the press run better and I think seating/crimping separately helps with ammo consistency. I purchased a deluxe quick change assembly which makes caliber changes a snap (no adjusting dies or powder measure) and extra primer pickup tubes. I wish I had converted to the 550 sooner. Enjoy!
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Old 03-10-2019, 06:34 PM
frogfurr frogfurr is offline
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After reloading on a single stage and turret for decades I went to a 550 a couple of years ago. A 550 is a very nice press and really not all that difficult to run. Still the change took me a while to get used to.

Reloaders are creatures of (good) habits. Takes a while to break habits. Good or bad.
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