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Old 12-09-2014, 09:00 PM
Mk10 Mk10 is offline
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For new classic turret owners like me

FOR NEW LEE CLASSIC TURRET OWNERS LIKE ME – WASHER AND ROD, PT. I

Warning: May be offensive, boring, or contradict things people might think who have been reloading longer than my 55 years on the planet, and my 2 weeks of following the Path of The Reloader. I appreciate and thank everyone for the sage words I’ve been able to have the opportunity to learn from by being on the forum, but this is for newbies like me who just got one, have just had one for a little bit, or has one to be set up or is on its way for Christmas fun.

SOME THINGS I’VE LEARNED:

New loaders will probably be inundated with a lot of big-time been-in-it-a-while loaders who are quite fond of Lee products who have never had any problems, and can’t understand or fathom why someone else might.

On the other side, they will encounter really upset people who complain about things I’ve encountered, who unfortunately it seems, never got any real decent advice either from Lee because the fates were aligned that day against them, and skirmish regularly with the happy Lee users who have never had anything go wrong.

I wanted to write something for folks like me, because I like the products, they’re affordable, but they do have some eccentricities that need to be understood and mastered to fully enjoy all of the capabilities of the product. Because their instruction sheet begs people to remain ignorant and not understand them. I don’t know why.

Hopefully, it’ll save you some time: Wading through the family fights to find clear, level-headed directions on precisely what you need to do and how to do it can take hours. Actually days. I did.

There actually isn’t a forum I’ve found that uses the English language that doesn’t, and my money is that there’s people arguing in Arabic or some form of Spanish debating the same things the same way halfway around the world as I write this.

I haven’t even got the powder and primer accessories installed because it took me so long to just set up the press and have it run smoothly and lock into position. One of the reason the grumbly sorts who are grumbly are grumbly that way, I can understand clearly. I’m not used to having mechanical things make me hate my life. I usually kick their butts, even if I’ve never dealt with that particular doo-wajie before. Feeling impotent trying to set up something everyone else says is ridiculously easy…isn’t easy.

After this two-part deal we’ll get the turret locking into place each time it advances. You did but a “turret” press didn’t you? I want it to spin of its own volition, so I can pretend I’m a really important guy somewhere cranking out something really important on a really important machine that I don’t advance by hand. At least at this point, when the press is all shiny!

THAT DING-DANG PLASTIC WASHER THINGIE THEY CALL A “RATCHET” FOR SOME REASON, KNOWN ONLY TO LEE AND THEIR GOD…PT I

If you don’t know by now, what makes the turret turn, or “index” to facilitate the loading process by having all needed dies rotate above your reload, is a little tiny piece of black plastic with a square shape. Sitting in the black plastic piece on top of the ram under the shell holder that’s held together by a phillips-head screw. It has the hole in it the piece of squared-off rod of metal goes through, with the twists in it, officially called the “SQ INDEX ROD LONG” on the Lee Precision website, along with the “ratchet.”

As you move the ram up and down, the plastic piece with the washer in it right below the place where the shell holder goes has the index rod running through it. On the downstroke of the ram, when the washer in the plastic piece (or auto-index clamp with the square ratchet in it in “LeeSpeak”) encounters the twists on the index rod, it stays locked in place, fighting against the twists, which means that since something’s gotta give, the rod turns with the turret holding the rod’s nut on top in its square indent on the bottom of it, forcing the the turret to turn!

So, you’ve got a cheesy piece of plastic the size of half of a pair of glasses a “mod-Ken!” doll would wear, that’s responsible for forcing a rod to turn, with a turret full of dies in it. Over and over and over again.

New people like us encounter folks who decry such heresy as a sure sign the commies are winning, and the other half doesn’t know what they’re talking about – because they’ve worked just fine for them for 63 years (insinuating that they’re stupid – it’s how I’d take it) so they’ve never even had to LOOK inside that auto-index clamp, much less see that washer, ratchet, or whatever those young whipper-snappers are calling it these days.

They’re both right.

It’s cheesy in a sense, the plastic washer and plastic holder, but then we got a loader that can do more than anything out there that costs hundreds of dollars more, a bunch of equipment, and most importantly, a lot of readily available support for the reloader. It was enough for me to really think about before drawing my own conclusions, and decide or not whether it was a travesty of reloading justice.

The important thing to realize, is that really, that piece of cheap plastic junk is your buddy. It’s going to sound off if something is “whack” with the press, by getting all bent out of shape. Think of it as a fifty-cent trouble alarm, or a catcher in the rye. If it starts messing up, stop. There’s something rotten in Denmark that needs attention, or you’re going to wind up spending a heck of lot more than fifty cents to fix it.

Order 5 of’em. Have’em on hand. They’re .50 apiece for pity’s sake. Send me a couple for havin’ such a good-lookin’ smile. I would have ordered some when I got all my stuff, I just didn’t know what was happening since I had no idea what an indexing rod is, much less a ratchet or an auto-index clamp. If you’ve got a buddy with a 3-D printer…definitely hook me up! Just get’em, stash them in your bench in case you need’em, and once you feel comfortable how the press works and its interrelated sequences of parts working together, you probably won’t need most of them, and when they clean out your stuff after you’re dead, they’ll wonder what those little tiny plastic things are that look like half of a pair of glass a “mod-Ken” doll would wear.

Why won’t you need’em? Because knowing how the press works, you won’t do things that cause an undue load on its flimsy butt, other than doing its job.

I’ll do a part two of this so I don’t get cut off, and in the next day or so we’ll talk adjusting auto-indexing. I’ve figured some stuff out from what I read in the manual, on forums, in videos on the Lee site, and watched a bunch of YouTube videos that PROVE the commies are winning. I’m still pretty stupid and worth making fun of, But I did find a way to put what I had learned into words and action.

If you’ve got it kind of set up, you’re probably able to take the turret off. If not do so. Now you can lift out the auto-indexing rod that’s square with the twists out of the press. Do so.

Mine came covered in gunk. Reminds me of Cosmoline. Do not, under any circumstances, put any kind of lubricant on it, the square washer, or in the black plastic auto-index clamp that holds it. Trust me. Just don’t.

What you DO need to do though, is get that thing cleaned up and smooth. Your rod I mean. No…the auto-indexing rod. Stop it.

I took some 400 grit sandpaper because it was all I had, but I would have preferred some 600. If you have a light touch, patience, and the ability to do something for quite a while, that’s okay too.

You want to just lightly take off the surface, with is a bunch of junk. You don’t want to smooth the rod’s edges any more than they are, change the width or thickness of the rod, or anything else like that. You just want to get that surface junk off, and have it feel smooth like a little square plastic washer could go up and down it smoothly.

CONT’D…

Last edited by Mk10; 12-09-2014 at 09:40 PM.
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  #2  
Old 12-09-2014, 09:14 PM
thomas15 thomas15 is offline
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Mk10

The specific details are different but your story is my story. Lousy written instructions are not the sole domain of Lee Precision, trust me on this.
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Old 12-09-2014, 09:28 PM
Mk10 Mk10 is offline
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For new lee classic owners like me - pt. Ii

FOR NEW LEE CLASSIC TURRET OWNERS LIKE ME – WASHER AND ROD, PT. II

Index rod also means axis rod, also means that rod thingie with the twists. All the same thing. I just get confused, and didn’t want you to think there was a bunch of rods hiding somewhere.

After you’ve sanded it off lightly so it’s smooth and nice, it’s going to have all kinds of stuff left on its surface. I polished it with NEV’R DULL or whatever that stuff is in the can that looks like insulation. You could use anything, but I’d lean towards something you’d use to get the powder marks off your stainless steel pistols. Take your time.

I even finished it off by buffing it with my flannel shirt. Again, you don’t want to change its physical size, just its surface characteristics so the plastic washer will slide nice on it. If you think you might have damaged the washer because you were having a hell of a time getting it go up and down, take it out now.

Get a strong light and a magnifying glass. That little piece of plastic has a bit of engineering to it. Compare it carefully with the 2nd washer they gave you. New ones have little bumps on each side that contacts the rod. You can’t see what makes them new and nasty unless you’ve got a ‘glass. There’s a good chance your original is okay if it’s not pushed out of the shape of a square.

Lubricate the sides of the turret. THE SIDES. Only. IMPORTANT: in the channel the turret sits in, on the side, is a ball. It depresses when the turret turns, and pops out helping to secure it in place when it locks in the proper place. Make sure it's lubricated well too. Lubricate the ram, the axis points shown in the manual, and if you notice a metal-to-metal there too as long as it’s not going to come in contact with bullet-making ingredients.

When you’ve wiped off the excess from the turret sides, put the washer back in the holder or “auto-index clamp” (if you took it apart), and attach it to the ram, remembering you’re screwing metal into plastic, not more metal, with the hole part rear under the shell holder slot. The washer goes into the slot so when the clamp in on the ramp, the flat thick part is up, and the side that has the “sides” hanging down goes down. Now put the axis rod back in. Flopped over didn’t it? Sorry.

Holding the axis rod with one hand, install the turret, turning the turret, or rod, or both, to make the square nut on top of the indexing rod fit in the square indent on the bottom of the turret. Lock the turret in so it’s part of the process. You’re almost ready to see if it it’s gonna work. Almost.

Make sure the press is mounted however you decided to mount it. Make sure everything is nice and snug. Make sure that bolts are tightened, and that nothing is blocking the up-and-down movement of the ram or its mechanism, or the lever itself.

Now try it, with the turret providing a little weight, the ram and turret sides lubricated, the axis points lubricated, the indexing rod slicker than a member of the Education Liberal Elite from sanding and buffing, with the washer properly installed (bigger flat part upwards, tiny sides handing down – down) in the auto index clamp. With the rod going through it.

As long as there isn’t something wrong that was a manufacturer’s defect, it should index now, turning the turret, and make you feel a heck of a lot better than you were a little bit ago. The turret may not lock into place when it spins on the downstroke exactly in place. That’s the next topic, about adjusting that so it does.

If it isn’t working smoothly, go back over what we’ve talked about how here, keeping that interrelation of the parts in mind. How they move together. What they might bind up against and why. Keep in mind how they work together, and where, if you were a hitch in somebody’s get-a-long, you’d be hiding in that process while a guy’s sitting there making up words you never heard in the merchant marine.

Also remember to spend the majority of your attention on that rod. The ability of the washer to slide over it is crucial. Especially when its stubbornness on the downstroke is what fights against those twists on the index rod, so when the washer is locked in place going down inside the clamp, it makes the index rod turn, and because the rod’s bolt on top is in the housing on bottom of the turret, the turret as well.

The problem is that finding information easily to approach it that way. When you’re frustrated, it isn’t easy. You either wonder if you’ve bought a piece of junk, or if you’re a big, stupid idiot, because apparently you can’t get something to work that has been the pinnacle of reloading technology no one else on earth or elsewhere has had a problem with since the day it was invented, sometime during the Paleozoic era.

Think of the money you saved with the Classic Turret when you wonder why in the name of Creation, Lee, who has people upset and worse about the plastic washer to the point of threatening lawsuits in 2007, since it’s something that can be worked with, functioning quite well by making loading a lot easier than a single-stage, that even functions as a trouble signal, hasn’t addressed pro-actively by explaining it like I have, so it makes sense.

That’s what I hate the most about disability. I can't point stuff like that out to other business people. In business, it just drives me crazy when people could handle it, tomorrow, with adding an equally tiny piece of paper into the manual that explains it. Add a page to the site. IIRS. Maybe it’s a test. I dunno.

Sometimes they do mention something important in the “Instruction Manual,” it’s just that it’s either real tiny print, sandwiched between two other statements about stuff anyone could have figured out, or just mentioned it, period. Like good information on the auto index clamp, how to install the washer in it right side up, etc. Sweet!

Also thank you to all the people who I was able to glean good advice from and combine with other stuff I’d learned to be able to write this for folks – I’m sure you’ve recognized yourselves in my words, and I thank you all!

Last edited by Mk10; 12-09-2014 at 09:42 PM.
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Old 12-09-2014, 10:03 PM
Mk10 Mk10 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thomas15 View Post
Mk10

The specific details are different but your story is my story. Lousy written instructions are not the sole domain of Lee Precision, trust me on this.
Haven't gotten far enough to run into other bumps in the road yet. The functioning of the indexing rod and washer in the auto-index clamp, plus the turret not indexing are the problems I saw appear in 99% of the complaints, and what I was experiencing personally, so I got to where I knew how to fix those and make it run like it should before moving on in the setup process.

When I run into others, I'll address them.

The main thing that makes me think it's possible to get them working by sifting through days of forum posts, reading and re-reading what little information Lee provides in the manual, the Lee videos and You Tube videos, is that there are hundreds of thousands, if not more, people out there having a gay old time loading tons of cartridges well, safely, and for as little money as is possible in the reloading world using their products.

So far, Lee's main fault seems to be an absolutely horrible approach to communicating how their stuff works to customers, or teaching beginniners about their products and how they work.

I really wish Lee would let me put together some manuals and FAQ's that were easy to follow for beginners, explained things in ways they'd understand, going after them like I always did in business, by empowering them enough to make them feel smart, in control, and feel like Lee was a part of their family, from day one of their reloading career when they clicked on the site.

If the stuff was nothing but a bunch of hooey, there wouldn't be a bunch of people using them religiously, and cranking out rounds to beat the band.

What we're left with, and what is maddening if not frustrating to me, is that to do so, you have to do all that stuff I mentioned to figure it out. At least that is if you're new to reloading, don't have a buddy to ask or help you, and don't feel like calling Lee every 15 minutes and hoping you get someone who'll hold your hand.

That's why I'd like to compile it for folks in one lump sum, combining the best parts of what I've gleaned from all that mess, to help those who felt like me. To try and say thanks for everything I've been able to learn on this forum, and a few others.

Also if anyone has any questions, feel free to shoot a message to me anytime, and I'll be glad to tell you as much as I've been able to figure out so far, just getting everything to work smoothly and correctly before I add the primer and poweder attachements and set the dies.
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Old 12-09-2014, 10:45 PM
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RetiredRod RetiredRod is offline
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Mk10, thanks for an excellent and entertaining write up. Almost makes me sorry I bought a Dillon.

(not really).
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Old 12-09-2014, 11:16 PM
guncheese guncheese is offline
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once i understood how the darn thing went together and was supposed to work
all was well!

so well in fact i took the next step and added a LoadMaster here that i do 3 calibers with and yes I PRIME ON THE PRESS !!!
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Old 12-10-2014, 12:29 AM
cindynles cindynles is offline
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The Lee CT does have some quirks, but once you get the hang of it, it works pretty well. I started out with one and loaded tens of thousands of rounds with it. I still use mine on occasion, but I just outgrew it. Its a great press to start on, my only real complaint was with the powder measure disc's. For most handgun cartridges you only get 2-3 weights between published min and max.

Red and Blue living in harmony:
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Old 12-10-2014, 01:54 AM
Taroman Taroman is offline
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I never installed the rod/washer unit. Threw it away.
Turning the turret manually is no problem.
Prefer it that way as I hand prime and use a Redding powder measure and loading blocks.
Do have every die set in its own turret, ready to drop in and go.
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Old 12-10-2014, 07:03 AM
Oldspad Oldspad is offline
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I have a Dillon 550B, but it sits alongside my Classic Lee. I use the Lee like a 3 stage turret, de-prime and re-size on a RockChucker, hand prime, and use a RCBS powder flask to charge the cases. It works well when I don't ask it to do too much, and it only is in use for .380 and 223....all the rest are done on the Dillon.
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Old 12-10-2014, 07:17 AM
Ran Ran is offline
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Entertaining post!

I started reloading less than a year ago, and the LCT is the first machine I bought. I'm reloading roughly 500 rounds/month on average, and have no complaints about it that are worth elaborating on.

I've honestly had very little trouble with any function of the unit, including the 'little square washer.' Keep it clean, lubricated, 'dialed in,' and I'm good to go..

I'm thinking seriously about picking up the Lee Loadmaster. Not because I 'need' it, but just because I'd like to putz with a progressive, and the cost of the Lee products lures me in..

Thanks for the post...Fun read..
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Old 12-10-2014, 07:46 AM
Laudanum Laudanum is offline
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MK10 ... Kudos. You realized right off the bat the reason why Lee incorporates that 50 cent "ratchet" in the press. There are probably folks who've owned that press since it was released that are still complaining about that piece being made out of breakable plastic.

For the record, I bought some spares (there should be a spare included as well) and haven't had to replace the original yet. Yet is 2 years. And, I usually index the turret by hand which may be the most common why in which those ratchets get broken. I don't remove the rod because sometimes I use the auto index feature.

That press is just like any other in that it just takes a little use to get to know it.

By the way ... there are a good number of Lee videos online, many linked on the Lee website. They may not be perfect or cover everything but they are a lot better resource than the written instructions.
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Old 12-10-2014, 07:53 AM
Laudanum Laudanum is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Taroman View Post
I never installed the rod/washer unit. Threw it away.
Turning the turret manually is no problem.
Prefer it that way as I hand prime and use a Redding powder measure and loading blocks.
Do have every die set in its own turret, ready to drop in and go.
It may not be built like the Redding T7 but the Lee cranks out perfectly good ammo and it's impossible to beat the $12 turrets (compared to $60) for caliber or task changes. Also cant beat how easy the come out and drop in.
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Old 12-10-2014, 08:03 AM
Harley Fan Harley Fan is offline
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I'd like to add to the chorus of thanks for a very entertaining read!

I have few issues with mine... other than the volume spread on the IMperfect powder measure discs. I found that with practice, I eliminated the occasional turret "less-than-90 degree" indexing with turret lubrication and the actual speed of me retracting the press handle.

Mine seems to really shine on 45acp. Somewhat less so for 38/357. Due to a low-charge squib I now physically pull a .357 cartridge out of the shell holder to 100% eyeball.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Taroman View Post
Do have every die set in its own turret, ready to drop in and go.
I now have 9mm, .38 and .45 dies, so as Taroman has done, I'm ready to shop for a couple more turret discs.
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Old 12-10-2014, 09:52 AM
totaldla totaldla is offline
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Originally Posted by Mk10 View Post
FOR NEW LEE CLASSIC TURRET OWNERS LIKE ME – WASHER AND ROD, PT. I

Warning: May be offensive, boring, or contradict things people might think who have been reloading longer than my 55 years on the planet, and my 2 weeks of following the Path of The Reloader. I appreciate and thank everyone for the sage words I’ve been able to have the opportunity to learn from by being on the forum, but this is for newbies like me who just got one, have just had one for a little bit, or has one to be set up or is on its way for Christmas fun.

SOME THINGS I’VE LEARNED:

New loaders will probably be inundated with a lot of big-time been-in-it-a-while loaders who are quite fond of Lee products who have never had any problems, and can’t understand or fathom why someone else might.

On the other side, they will encounter really upset people who complain about things I’ve encountered, who unfortunately it seems, never got any real decent advice either from Lee because the fates were aligned that day against them, and skirmish regularly with the happy Lee users who have never had anything go wrong.

I wanted to write something for folks like me, because I like the products, they’re affordable, but they do have some eccentricities that need to be understood and mastered to fully enjoy all of the capabilities of the product. Because their instruction sheet begs people to remain ignorant and not understand them. I don’t know why.

Hopefully, it’ll save you some time: Wading through the family fights to find clear, level-headed directions on precisely what you need to do and how to do it can take hours. Actually days. I did.

There actually isn’t a forum I’ve found that uses the English language that doesn’t, and my money is that there’s people arguing in Arabic or some form of Spanish debating the same things the same way halfway around the world as I write this.

I haven’t even got the powder and primer accessories installed because it took me so long to just set up the press and have it run smoothly and lock into position. One of the reason the grumbly sorts who are grumbly are grumbly that way, I can understand clearly. I’m not used to having mechanical things make me hate my life. I usually kick their butts, even if I’ve never dealt with that particular doo-wajie before. Feeling impotent trying to set up something everyone else says is ridiculously easy…isn’t easy.

After this two-part deal we’ll get the turret locking into place each time it advances. You did but a “turret” press didn’t you? I want it to spin of its own volition, so I can pretend I’m a really important guy somewhere cranking out something really important on a really important machine that I don’t advance by hand. At least at this point, when the press is all shiny!

THAT DING-DANG PLASTIC WASHER THINGIE THEY CALL A “RATCHET” FOR SOME REASON, KNOWN ONLY TO LEE AND THEIR GOD…PT I

If you don’t know by now, what makes the turret turn, or “index” to facilitate the loading process by having all needed dies rotate above your reload, is a little tiny piece of black plastic with a square shape. Sitting in the black plastic piece on top of the ram under the shell holder that’s held together by a phillips-head screw. It has the hole in it the piece of squared-off rod of metal goes through, with the twists in it, officially called the “SQ INDEX ROD LONG” on the Lee Precision website, along with the “ratchet.”

As you move the ram up and down, the plastic piece with the washer in it right below the place where the shell holder goes has the index rod running through it. On the downstroke of the ram, when the washer in the plastic piece (or auto-index clamp with the square ratchet in it in “LeeSpeak”) encounters the twists on the index rod, it stays locked in place, fighting against the twists, which means that since something’s gotta give, the rod turns with the turret holding the rod’s nut on top in its square indent on the bottom of it, forcing the the turret to turn!

So, you’ve got a cheesy piece of plastic the size of half of a pair of glasses a “mod-Ken!” doll would wear, that’s responsible for forcing a rod to turn, with a turret full of dies in it. Over and over and over again.

New people like us encounter folks who decry such heresy as a sure sign the commies are winning, and the other half doesn’t know what they’re talking about – because they’ve worked just fine for them for 63 years (insinuating that they’re stupid – it’s how I’d take it) so they’ve never even had to LOOK inside that auto-index clamp, much less see that washer, ratchet, or whatever those young whipper-snappers are calling it these days.

They’re both right.

It’s cheesy in a sense, the plastic washer and plastic holder, but then we got a loader that can do more than anything out there that costs hundreds of dollars more, a bunch of equipment, and most importantly, a lot of readily available support for the reloader. It was enough for me to really think about before drawing my own conclusions, and decide or not whether it was a travesty of reloading justice.

The important thing to realize, is that really, that piece of cheap plastic junk is your buddy. It’s going to sound off if something is “whack” with the press, by getting all bent out of shape. Think of it as a fifty-cent trouble alarm, or a catcher in the rye. If it starts messing up, stop. There’s something rotten in Denmark that needs attention, or you’re going to wind up spending a heck of lot more than fifty cents to fix it.

Order 5 of’em. Have’em on hand. They’re .50 apiece for pity’s sake. Send me a couple for havin’ such a good-lookin’ smile. I would have ordered some when I got all my stuff, I just didn’t know what was happening since I had no idea what an indexing rod is, much less a ratchet or an auto-index clamp. If you’ve got a buddy with a 3-D printer…definitely hook me up! Just get’em, stash them in your bench in case you need’em, and once you feel comfortable how the press works and its interrelated sequences of parts working together, you probably won’t need most of them, and when they clean out your stuff after you’re dead, they’ll wonder what those little tiny plastic things are that look like half of a pair of glass a “mod-Ken” doll would wear.

Why won’t you need’em? Because knowing how the press works, you won’t do things that cause an undue load on its flimsy butt, other than doing its job.

I’ll do a part two of this so I don’t get cut off, and in the next day or so we’ll talk adjusting auto-indexing. I’ve figured some stuff out from what I read in the manual, on forums, in videos on the Lee site, and watched a bunch of YouTube videos that PROVE the commies are winning. I’m still pretty stupid and worth making fun of, But I did find a way to put what I had learned into words and action.

If you’ve got it kind of set up, you’re probably able to take the turret off. If not do so. Now you can lift out the auto-indexing rod that’s square with the twists out of the press. Do so.

Mine came covered in gunk. Reminds me of Cosmoline. Do not, under any circumstances, put any kind of lubricant on it, the square washer, or in the black plastic auto-index clamp that holds it. Trust me. Just don’t.

What you DO need to do though, is get that thing cleaned up and smooth. Your rod I mean. No…the auto-indexing rod. Stop it.

I took some 400 grit sandpaper because it was all I had, but I would have preferred some 600. If you have a light touch, patience, and the ability to do something for quite a while, that’s okay too.

You want to just lightly take off the surface, with is a bunch of junk. You don’t want to smooth the rod’s edges any more than they are, change the width or thickness of the rod, or anything else like that. You just want to get that surface junk off, and have it feel smooth like a little square plastic washer could go up and down it smoothly.

CONT’D…
I'm not a nuclear rocket scientist, yet Lee's classic turret works for me and is super simple to understand. And I don't have to use so much prose to say so.
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  #15  
Old 12-10-2014, 10:14 AM
cdhbrad cdhbrad is offline
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Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Bradenton, FL
Posts: 2,217
No rocket scientist here either. When I bought mine, I just followed the Lee instructions and a couple of their videos and mine has loaded more than 10K rounds. I think I have changed the indexing part once.
I did quickly learn that Lee Powder Measures are pretty much worthless and switched to a RCBS Uniflow with micrometer adjuster and the case activated linkage kit for every caliber I load.....priceless.
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  #16  
Old 12-10-2014, 10:27 AM
Old Guy Old Guy is offline
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Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Florida Panhandle
Posts: 752
I bought a Lee Turret when I first started reloading 6-7 years ago. It's still the only press I own. It works great for me. I reload from 32 acp to 308 with no problems and changing calibers is only a few seconds.

For those reloading pistol calibers, put away the powder measure disks. Get the Lee Adjustable Charge Bar. It gives you the ability to dial in the powder charge you want.
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The problem with the world is stupidity. I'm not saying there should be a capital punishment for stupidity, but why don't we just take the safety labels off of everything and let the problem solve itself?
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  #17  
Old 12-10-2014, 11:52 AM
Mk10 Mk10 is offline
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Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Mid-Missouri
Age: 60
Posts: 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by Laudanum View Post
MK10 ... Kudos. You realized right off the bat the reason why Lee incorporates that 50 cent "ratchet" in the press. There are probably folks who've owned that press since it was released that are still complaining about that piece being made out of breakable plastic.

For the record, I bought some spares (there should be a spare included as well) and haven't had to replace the original yet. Yet is 2 years. And, I usually index the turret by hand which may be the most common why in which those ratchets get broken. I don't remove the rod because sometimes I use the auto index feature.

That press is just like any other in that it just takes a little use to get to know it.

By the way ... there are a good number of Lee videos online, many linked on the Lee website. They may not be perfect or cover everything but they are a lot better resource than the written instructions.
Thanks.

This after spending literally days going through those videos and anything I could find. Each one would have a really good way of looking at something but fall down and some part of execution, results, etcetera. That's why when I decided to write an amalgamation of all that stuff that seemed to work for me, based on my child like understanding of the press.

I figured if I had found ways of looking at things and the way they work on the press that works for me, they would work for anybody.

But oh yeah...I watched a lot of videos on the Lee's site, YouTube, and probably anybody that had ever thought about reloading something in their lifetime with a cell phone in the dream.
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  #18  
Old 12-10-2014, 12:47 PM
1911KY 1911KY is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: KY
Posts: 1,941
I found there instructions a bit lacking as well, but with the help of Youtube I got mine up and in running in short order.

Haven't had any issues with my ratchet so far thru 2,500 rounds, 2000 bullet sizings & 4,000 deprimes. I did just remove the indexing arm a couple weeks ago and started manually indexing the turret. I find it saves me movement on the handle as you don't need to go all the way to the bottom on every stroke.
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  #19  
Old 12-10-2014, 03:40 PM
GWB GWB is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Mantua ,Ohio
Age: 62
Posts: 802
That 50 cent piece is a piece of crap but once you get by that and as has been stated put the adjustable charge bar on its a very nice machine for the money and will crank out some rounds.I load 40, 10, 45, 45lc, 460 [email protected] and 223s on mine and it works fine.Not sure how many rounds its loaded but I know its well into the 10k area.You get what you pay for and If I remember I only paid like 120 bucks for mine.I charge all my rounds by hand with a mounted rcbs so mine is more of a 3 stage.Red, green, blue its all the same result in the end.Down range we go!!!
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