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  #1  
Old 11-01-2006, 07:33 AM
Denny Denny is offline
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Galling

Have a stainless gun put together by a good smith but it is galling. Can anyone save me $100 dollars in shipping it not too tough of a project,
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  #2  
Old 11-01-2006, 09:10 AM
ambidextrous1 ambidextrous1 is offline
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Mating stainless surfaces tend to gall under pressure without lubrication; heat is also a factor.

If you keep the surfaces well lubed, galling won't occur.

For lubrication, the graphite and molybdenium lubes are the best, but both are very messy. A synthetic gun oil should be satisfactory.

If the galling has affected the functionof your firearm, that's a serious problem, and the remedy is metal removal - as little as possible, of course.

I have been concerned about galling since stainless steel was first used in firearms many years ago, but haven't many complaints about it. Is your weapon set up very tight?
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  #3  
Old 11-01-2006, 06:48 PM
Greatgoogamooga Greatgoogamooga is offline
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As my gunsmith told me when I first brought him my stainless Mil-Spec, "Stainless likes oil."

A fine or medium fine stone will remove some of it from the frame rails. You can also use lapping compound, fine or very fine grit. I have not had problems with galling on the Springfield, but I oil the snot out of it. i've used everything from Kleen-bore oil to Phil's tenacious oil (great for bicyles!). LOTS of oil.

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  #4  
Old 11-01-2006, 08:00 PM
Gammon Gammon is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Denny
Have a stainless gun put together by a good smith but it is galling. Can anyone save me $100 dollars in shipping it not too tough of a project,
Galling was aproblem 20 years ago but, with the modern alloys available, it has pretty much disappeared. Something is wrong, particularly if you have kept the gun lubed. I would return it.
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  #5  
Old 11-01-2006, 08:53 PM
trooper894 trooper894 is offline
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Over the years, I've accumulated numerous pistols in stainless with each using a different formulation of stainless. Including 2 Colts, 3 S&W, 2 Rugers, 1 Kahr and probably the worst offender is still the iAi Javelina in 10mm (which are known to be horrible for galling). Early on I started using Rig +P Stainless Steel Lube for the rails, frame contact areas and the barrel contact areas and have not had a single problem with galling. The Rig for Stainless is a different formulation than their Rust inhibiting grease and I've had great luck with it and a little goes a long way.
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  #6  
Old 11-03-2006, 12:28 AM
DBR DBR is offline
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Smooth all of the rough spots with 600 grit silicon carbide "wet or dry" abrasive paper and oil. You should be able to get this at an autobody supply store. Smooth lightly, only in the direction of travel of the parts. Then clean the parts completely.

Don't try to polish the parts. You need a surface profile to hold the lubricant. Lube with a heavy synthetic motor oil. Mobil 1 ?W-50 should be good.

As you break in the surfaces keep an eye on the matting parts for the next 400-500 rds. Smooth any "feathers" that develop on the edges of the mating parts. It is a PIA, but if you can get the parts properly mated and then keep them lubed with an EP oil that clings you will probably be OK.

I suggest forgetting "gun oils". You need a lube that stays on the metal and restores it's film. Grease will not do this. Grease will not flow back to cover wear surfaces and over time will separate into oil and filler components. No disrespect to Trooper894, but good synthetic oils will probably work better for you then Rig +P grease given proper maintenance. The exception might be for a fully broken in carry gun where the grease might stay put better and longer until the gun is fired.

Last edited by DBR; 11-03-2006 at 01:23 AM.
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  #7  
Old 11-03-2006, 03:36 PM
Tempest Tempest is offline
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Quote:
Don't try to polish the parts. You need a surface profile to hold the lubricant
Smoother is better. A smoother surface = greater oil film strength. A rough surface to "hold oil" will only cause more friction and wear (more spikes to pop the oil "balloon").

Quote:
Lube with a heavy synthetic motor oil. Mobil 1 ?W-50 should be good... lubed with an EP oil
IMHO, a 50 weight oil is way thick. If your going to go with an automotive product, a 20 weight or ATF would be plenty. Engine oil contains no EP additives. It does contain AW (ZDDP, boron, etc.) which is a good thing, but no EP (Sulphur, Phos, or Halogenated).

Quote:
You need a lube that stays on the metal and restores it's film
May I ask what film you are referring too? My understanding is that the oxide on the surface of the steel that gets stripped away during galling naturally re-occurs upon contact with oxygen (air).

Quote:
Grease will not flow back to cover wear surfaces and over time will separate into oil and filler components
I'm not sure what you mean by "flow back". I'm no fan of grease at all, but it will lubricate. The base oil separation can be a problem, but usually only in the cheaper greases.

I agree with your methods for trying to smooth the surfaces. I would recommend FP10 as it has both AW and EP additives, as well as the ability to chemically polish steel surfaces.
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  #8  
Old 11-04-2006, 05:32 PM
DBR DBR is offline
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Tempest:
I agree in general with the smoother is better concept. However, my experience with the stainless alloys used in guns is that a good 100% synthetic oil seems to work better if there is a fine surface profile IN THE DIRECTION OF TRAVEL. The EP properties of the oil I use cause the profile to burnish rather than gal. That is one of the reasons it is not recommended for engine break in. It will not allow the rings to produce a good wear pattern/seal.

The 50W syn will wick through .0002 spaces (that's not a typo) but always leaves a surface film even on open surfaces. If the surface film is disturbed like between rubbing surfaces the oil will flow back and restore the film. It does not run off and leave the surface dry. The chemist says that at least in the racing oils they have an organic moly EP additive which according to him is why the oil is green in color. The ASL Camguard additive also contains EP aditives. The Camguard additive was designed to work with the Redline oils. At least this is what I was told.

The film I was referring to was the oil, not the SS surface.

According to the chemist at Redline Oil all of the base stock is 5W and it is thickened with additives to make it act like 50W dino oil at high temps except it doesn't thicken at low temps like dino oil.

I use 10-30W in my truck year round and it pours freely and the truck starts at -10F after sitting for a week.

Last edited by DBR; 11-04-2006 at 05:39 PM.
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  #9  
Old 11-05-2006, 02:17 AM
Sheldon Sheldon is offline
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Some guys swear by the Riggs +P grease for stainless guns. I had a Gold Cup that wouldn't stop galling no matter what. I finally got Colt to refund my money on that one. I bought a used Stainless Gold Cup with that money. I broke it down before buying it to make sure there were no signs of galling.
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  #10  
Old 11-05-2006, 02:33 AM
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pistolwrench pistolwrench is offline
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Heck guys,
Yesterday, well mebbe the day before, I just completed a match grade slide to frame fit on a Series 80 38 Super stainless Colt.
Match grade, no play.
Modern stainless alloys as used by Colt do not gall, unless someone does something wrong.
Maintain a smooth surface finish with lots of contact.
Conventional lubricants such as FP10 are just fine.
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  #11  
Old 11-06-2006, 10:35 AM
Tempest Tempest is offline
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DBR:

Thanks for the clarification. Didn't know you are using Redline. It's base oil is mostly (if not all) ester based which is polar and will stick to metal like a magnet. It also usually contains TONS of moly when compared to most other oils. I still think 50W oil is too thick (especially with an ester base oil), but it will work and is better than grease. I would use your 10W30.

Most racing oils don't contain the level of dispererants or other cleaners that typical car oil does because the oil is normally only used a short time. On the other hand, it normally contains higher levels of AW because of the extreme demands put on racing engines. I would dump the Camgaurd as from what I could tell it's mostly anti-corrosion and anti-oxidant with some friction modifier/AW thrown in. I didn't see any reference to EP on their site.

Sorry for the ramble.
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Old 11-06-2006, 11:16 AM
Bladeandbarrel Bladeandbarrel is offline
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Conventional lubricants such as FP10 are just fine.
And it (FP10)remains the BEST lube regardless of the metal and believe me I have used everything...
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  #13  
Old 11-13-2006, 10:15 AM
Denny Denny is offline
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Thanks

Thanks for all the information and all Hope I can get it running
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