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  #1  
Old 04-07-2020, 10:31 AM
enormitydave enormitydave is offline
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Hornady's One Shot to lube internals?

I have a Colt Series 80 that's sitting in a mineral spirits bath right now and I'm trying to figure out the best way to get it lubed once I take it out since I've never done this kind of thing before. I dropped the frame in with all of the internals still intact hoping to avoid further disassembly and I was wondering if hitting it with a dose of One Shot from the top would be sufficient to take care of all of those parts. If not, what is your advice? I know putting oil in there isn't advisable since it will eventually gather dirt and gunk up, so I figured a dry lube like this would be good. Is it ok to let those parts just run dry and not worry about it? Does anyone know what treatment Colt gives the internals from the factory? A light lubing or none at all?

EDIT: Also, will the mineral spirits just evaporate or is that all going to have to be dried by hand?

Last edited by enormitydave; 04-07-2020 at 12:49 PM.
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Old 04-07-2020, 12:40 PM
USMM guy USMM guy is online now
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I would not recommend one shot for this purpose.

It is not really made for that and is really only designed for a very short lived purpose of allowing you to reform brass, a one time thing.

Lots of people will tell you different things to do. And there is not necessarily a one size fits all solution for every set of circumstances. You mentioned oil and your concern about it attracting dirt. That is a legitimate concern. But you can mitigate that by just using a small amount of it. That is really the way to go in my book.

Personally I use three in one oil in the summer time, and Kano Kroil in the winter. Just a couple of drops and I have never had an issue. If you get too much in there just blow it out with some compressed air.
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Old 04-07-2020, 12:47 PM
ken_mays ken_mays is offline
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Mineral spirits will remove oil from metal parts.

There is a One Shot gun cleaner & lube, which seems to be alcohol based PTFE. This won't migrate and is not going to be effective for preventing corrosion.

Either spray the frame nooks and crannies (around hammer, disconnector, etc.) with a light oil lubricant such as Mobil One spray or similar, and wipe off excess.... or disassemble frame, spray or wipe down parts, reassemble. Then place oil on the usual 1911 lubrication points.
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  #4  
Old 04-07-2020, 12:50 PM
jtq jtq is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by enormitydave View Post
I have a Colt Series 80 that's sitting in a mineral spirits bath ...
EDIT: Also, will the mineral spirits just evaporate or is that all going to have to be dried by hand?
Soaking a gun in mineral spirits is not something I ever do, but here is Ernest Langdon on gun cleaning - Beretta's of course - but he uses mineral spirits.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4hmewqhe-hc
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  #5  
Old 04-07-2020, 12:53 PM
enormitydave enormitydave is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by USMM guy View Post
It is not really made for that and is really only designed for a very short lived purpose of allowing you to reform brass, a one time thing.

Lots of people will tell you different things to do. And there is not necessarily a one size fits all solution for every set of circumstances. You mentioned oil and your concern about it attracting dirt. That is a legitimate concern. But you can mitigate that by just using a small amount of it. That is really the way to go in my book.

Personally I use three in one oil in the summer time, and Kano Kroil in the winter. Just a couple of drops and I have never had an issue. If you get too much in there just blow it out with some compressed air.
You sure? I've read a lot of good reviews


Quote:
Originally Posted by ken_mays View Post
Mineral spirits will remove oil from metal parts.

There is a One Shot gun cleaner & lube, which seems to be alcohol based PTFE. This won't migrate and is not going to be effective for preventing corrosion.

Either spray the frame nooks and crannies (around hammer, disconnector, etc.) with a light oil lubricant such as Mobil One spray or similar, and wipe off excess.... or disassemble frame, spray or wipe down parts, reassemble. Then place oil on the usual 1911 lubrication points.
According to an experiment I saw from this guy earlier, the stuff held up thru a week of rain and getting sprayed with salt water. I just need something that'll keep rust spots off my pistol in the house or occasionally going outside, so I think it should be sufficient.

Last edited by enormitydave; 04-07-2020 at 01:02 PM.
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  #6  
Old 04-07-2020, 12:59 PM
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This stuff gets my vote:

https://www.radcoind.com/clp/
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  #7  
Old 04-07-2020, 01:00 PM
borderboss1 borderboss1 is online now
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Now that you've soaked it in mineral spirits, you're stuck doing something that will hit every part of the internals of your gun. Anything you miss will definitely rust. My recommendation would be to take it apart and lube it properly. I don't see any other option.
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Old 04-07-2020, 01:14 PM
US1911 US1911 is offline
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Welcome to the forum Dave!

Assuming you donít have an ultrasonic cleaner, then Iíd dry it back off the best you can, hit it with some compressed air, squirt it down with some CLP, blow off the excess, lock the slide back, add a drop of gun oil to the rails, disconnector and barrel, ride the slide closed, then put a line of oil between the top of where the top-front of the barrel can be seen in the chamber and slide.

Rack the pistol a few times and perform a function check.
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  #9  
Old 04-07-2020, 01:17 PM
enormitydave enormitydave is offline
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Any opinions on Mil-Comm TW25B?


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Originally Posted by US1911 View Post
Welcome to the forum Dave!

Assuming you don’t have an ultrasonic cleaner, then I’d dry it back off the best you can, hit it with some compressed air, squirt it down with some CLP, blow off the excess, lock the slide back, add a drop of gun oil to the rails, disconnector and barrel, ride the slide closed, then put a line of oil between the top of where the top-front of the barrel can be seen in the chamber and slide.

Rack the pistol a few times and perform a function check.
Thanks man! Yeah I'm familiar with the regular lube spots but I've never done a deep clean like this. Unfortunately I think I'm gonna have to take it down a little further just so I don't have to worry about it. Not planning on doing this again anytime soon.

Last edited by enormitydave; 04-07-2020 at 01:26 PM.
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  #10  
Old 04-07-2020, 01:18 PM
4110mm 4110mm is offline
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I use it to clean out debris and dirt from my loading dies after every use. And that works great. Not on guns.
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  #11  
Old 04-07-2020, 01:19 PM
TahoeDust TahoeDust is offline
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I would be tempted to soak it in something like CLP or Ballistol after just to make sure everything gets coated with oil.
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Old 04-07-2020, 01:20 PM
jtq jtq is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by enormitydave View Post
Any opinions on Mil-Comm TW25B?
I've never used it, but it has a great reputation.

However, you're going to need to take your gun apart to get that grease on everything. If you're going to do that, just about any lube would work.
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Old 04-07-2020, 01:21 PM
jtq jtq is online now
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If I didn't want to take the gun apart, I'd pull it out of the mineral spirits, let it dry and ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by TahoeDust View Post
I would be tempted to soak it in something like CLP or Ballistol after just to make sure everything gets coated with oil.
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Old 04-07-2020, 01:32 PM
enormitydave enormitydave is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TahoeDust View Post
I would be tempted to soak it in something like CLP or Ballistol after just to make sure everything gets coated with oil.
That would be the easiest thing to do, but don't you think that's going to be too much? In my research today I keep hearing as a general rule that it's better to run light than too heavy when it comes to oil. I've never dealt with these internal parts, just always put a drop here and there on the barrel, slide, mags etc.

Last edited by enormitydave; 04-07-2020 at 01:36 PM.
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Old 04-07-2020, 01:36 PM
jtq jtq is online now
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In the future for cleaning, I know a lot of folks like to degrease their guns, but I've never found a need to, and stick to CLP's (a category of products and not a brand). BreakFree, SLIP 2000, Ballistol, I'm sure the Radco product listed above is great, heck, they're all probably great. They all work well enough, and if you miss something it doesn't matter because it's an all in one, Cleaner, Lube, Protectant.
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  #16  
Old 04-07-2020, 01:37 PM
jtq jtq is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by enormitydave View Post
That would be the easiest thing to do, but don't you think that's going to be too much?
Let it drain out. It may take some time, and you may need to do a bit of a wipe down with a rag.

Last edited by jtq; 04-07-2020 at 02:02 PM.
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  #17  
Old 04-07-2020, 01:39 PM
jtq jtq is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by enormitydave View Post
In my research today I keep hearing as a general rule that it's better to run light than too heavy when it comes to oil. I've never dealt with these internal parts, just always put a drop here and there on the barrel, slide, mags etc.
Ooooh, a Glock guy?

Just a little humor for you, Larry Vickers on "The Myth of Over Lubrication"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p9bOT_d60LM

Last edited by jtq; 04-07-2020 at 02:02 PM.
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  #18  
Old 04-07-2020, 01:44 PM
jtq jtq is online now
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Here are a few lube video's that may be helpful. Note they aren't all exactly the same. Pick and choose what you like, but they all will work.

Hickok45 uses Ballistol, a CLP https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8wPPUXU3Lhc

Dave Anderson with some grease and oil https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9eUacqOIAaU

Wilson Combat https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t4D2mRlDo48
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  #19  
Old 04-07-2020, 01:47 PM
Jim Watson Jim Watson is offline
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Take it apart, clean it - there is probably grime in there that the mineral spirits didn't dissolve - oil it with whatever suits you, and put it back together.
Getting the lawyer levers aligned can be a bit tedious but the rest was meant for care by a PFC.
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Old 04-07-2020, 02:50 PM
jjfitch jjfitch is online now
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Don't be afraid to completely disassemble the thing! Marines can even do it!

OK, that's out of the way!

Follow the Wilson video. This wasn't available back in the day! After a few times you'll wonder what the trepidations were!

The 1911 doesn't require complete deep cleaning but maybe once a year or when dumped in guck! 1911 guys worth their salt can do it in just a few minutes while telling war stories!

My secret sauce is 50% deodorized mineral spirits, 50% deodorized kerosene and ATF at 32:1 this gets mixed in a 1 quart spray bottle and is used like a pressure washer! I usually clean multiple guns this way at the same time.

Regular "One Shot" case lube is alcohol and anhydrous lanolin! Great lube and rust preventative.

Smiles,
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  #21  
Old 04-07-2020, 03:32 PM
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Dry lube and grease are both the wrong lubes to use inside the frame. You will need to remove it from the mineral spirits, wipe dry and learn how to fully disassemble it. Wipe out the insides then apply Break-Free or some other gun oil (even light-viscosity synthetic motor oil will work) to the insides and all small parts. Use a Q-tip or other applicator so that you don't have to get everything completely drenched. If you don't want to fully disassemble it then you'll need to get a spray can of Break-Free, douse it, then let it drip dry for a week.
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  #22  
Old 04-07-2020, 04:16 PM
TRSOtto TRSOtto is offline
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You know what???

I think we have our first Covid-19 lube thread!!!!!
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  #23  
Old 04-07-2020, 05:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by enormitydave View Post
Any opinions on Mil-Comm TW25B?
I (personally) think Mil-Com TW25B and Tetra lube are the same stuff.

If I remember, they both come from the exact same company based in NJ.
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Old 04-07-2020, 05:40 PM
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You know what???

I think we have our first Covid-19 lube thread!!!!!
Hahahahaha!!
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Old 04-07-2020, 05:50 PM
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Dave,

Unless you are using your 1911 in extremely dry dusty conditions, the idea that it should be free of oil to prevent dust sticking seems wrong: Any humidity or sweat and it is likely to rust inside.

Dunking the pistol in CLP, engine oil, or mineral oil (used as laxative, so safe on your skin), then allowing gravity to drain off the excess is the lazy way to lube it; such that no part remains dry.

Just how much oil is required for corrosion protection and lubrication? Probably less than one would think. While I would not shoot a pistol dunked in oil, as seen in the above video myth of overlubrication, without wiping out most of it from the bore, or more completely gravity draining the barrel, the oil left on the gun after shooting a few mags is about right. The excess gets flung off. In the video, one of the guys proclaims the shooter has more oil on his clothes than some students apply to their guns.

Obviously, "too much oil" can make your hands slippery. That is not useful when trying to control the gun, but provides a clue.

How much oil does a 1911 want? As much as it holds after shooting 5 mags; starting with it seeping wet. If you don't like oil running onto your clothes from a holstered pistol, use a thin sticky grease, such as Slide Glide.
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