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  #26  
Old 03-28-2020, 08:12 AM
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TominMO TominMO is offline
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Welcome OP! The 22 is a good choice, especially for getting the wife/kid into the game. I would have said (if just for you) go with a 9mm 1911. No law (yet) against owning more than one 1911. They do tend to multiply.....

When you do move up, 9mm is cheaper to shoot and has less recoil, as has been said. Again good for wife/kid. I also strongly recommend you get proper shooting instruction from a pro as soon as possible, for the whole family. Otherwise you are likely to be somewhat wasting time and ammo by not practicing knowledgeably, ingraining poor practices. Especially safety practices! I was an RSO up until the shutdown happened, and taught a lot of people the fundamentals. The most important part was safety awareness. It's not the pros you need to worry about at the range, it's the noobs.....

Respectfully recommend you have a moderator change your screen name for you to one that does not contain covid. Do you really want that handle for all time?

Happy shooting!
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  #27  
Old 03-28-2020, 08:56 AM
HarryO45 HarryO45 is online now
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Originally Posted by covid-1911 View Post
Thanks! That's another option to consider.
Recommend the little browning too, but get one with a tall front sight. My .22 has the government small front sight. My wife’s .380 is the Black Label Model much superior Sights.
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  #28  
Old 03-28-2020, 09:12 AM
bullet45acp bullet45acp is offline
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Enjoy the heck out of your .22 - as mentioned spend a little more money and buy better 22 ammo. - the bottom of the line .22 ammo is just hangfire after hangfire...

Every .22 I own has a particular brand of .22 ammo it seems to like better, that is more accurate, works more reliably - so buy several small boxes of different stuff before buying 1000 round boxes...

Josh
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  #29  
Old 03-28-2020, 09:15 AM
Sergio Natali Sergio Natali is offline
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First off welcome to our 1911 forum from Italy.
I think it's mainly a matter of personal likings. I've always loved the 1911 and in the last decades I've owned and used/collected many of them. My Wilson Combat 1911 cal. .45ACP remains the best bullseye pistol, while I still enjoy using my 31 years old BERETTA 98FS in cal 9x21 IMI for tactical/combat shooting training.

Regards.
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  #30  
Old 03-28-2020, 01:44 PM
SC shooter SC shooter is offline
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Originally Posted by dsk View Post
The .22LR is a great choice for starting out. Low cost and non-existent recoil makes it easy for anyone to shoot. Be advised however that the reliability of the cartridge isn't like centerfire rounds... you'll have the occasional dud or weak round, which is normal. Once the buying panic subsides and ammo is easier to find again you'll have to experiment to find which ammo works the best in your new Browning. Most likely CCI brand, but others may work good as well. Just try to stay away from the cheap "bulk pack" ammo until you've gotten good at clearing malfunctions.
Take notice of this post by DSK because it is very important. Some 22s will shoot almost anything with no problem but others will only work well with CCI or other good high velocity 22 ammo. Find out what works best in your gun have fun and be safe.

My daughter started out with 22 and now shoots 9 mm, 45 and even 44 magnum with no problem. I think feeling that little bit of recoil is part of the fun of shooting.
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  #31  
Old 04-03-2020, 05:50 PM
covid-1911 covid-1911 is offline
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Originally Posted by dsk View Post
...Be advised however that the reliability of the cartridge isn't like centerfire rounds... you'll have the occasional dud or weak round, which is normal. Once the buying panic subsides and ammo is easier to find again you'll have to experiment to find which ammo works the best in your new Browning. Most likely CCI brand, but others may work good as well. Just try to stay away from the cheap "bulk pack" ammo until you've gotten good at clearing malfunctions.
Thanks! I really appreciate these kind of tips that help eliminate or minimize possible frustrations resulting from using the wrong stuffs.

How about the first things to do when the gun arrives? Should I perform a cleaning procedure? Do these guns come with their own cleaning accessories? If not, what should I buy?
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  #32  
Old 04-03-2020, 06:13 PM
covid-1911 covid-1911 is offline
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Originally Posted by TominMO View Post
... I would have said (if just for you) go with a 9mm 1911. No law (yet) against owning more than one 1911. They do tend to multiply.....

When you do move up, 9mm is cheaper to shoot and has less recoil, as has been said...
Incidentally, I have also ordered a 9mm after 5 days of placing an order for the .22LR Browning model. Looks like the 9mm (ordered from another store) is going to arrive first because I received a shipping notification the next day. But the .22 cal is still waiting to be shipped. It's been a week now.


Quote:
Originally Posted by TominMO View Post
Respectfully recommend you have a moderator change your screen name for you to one that does not contain covid. Do you really want that handle for all time?
I was in a hurry to think of a handle. If it's not offensive to anybody, I'll probably just leave it for now. Good to know it can be changed.
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  #33  
Old 04-03-2020, 06:21 PM
covid-1911 covid-1911 is offline
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Thanks again to all of you for the warm welcomes and those valuable tips and advice.
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  #34  
Old 04-03-2020, 11:03 PM
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dsk dsk is offline
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Originally Posted by covid-1911 View Post
Thanks! I really appreciate these kind of tips that help eliminate or minimize possible frustrations resulting from using the wrong stuffs.

How about the first things to do when the gun arrives? Should I perform a cleaning procedure? Do these guns come with their own cleaning accessories? If not, what should I buy?
With any gun you need a cleaning kit which includes a cleaning rod, jags, brushes, patches, solvent and oil. The subject of cleaning gear can easily run multiple pages, but as a beginner just get a kit in the appropriate caliber to start with. You'll want to run a patch down the barrel to be sure there is no gunk inside, and apply a few drops of oil to the moving parts especially the slide and frame rails. Aside from that, nothing needs to be done. A thorough cleaning will be required after you fire a couple hundred rounds as the .22 is a very dirty cartridge, leaving powder residue everywhere. There are plenty of gun cleaning videos on YouTube so just watch those, and above all else NEVER begin cleaning without first being sure you're doing it with an unloaded firearm. It's unbelievable how many people screw that one up and end up having an accident.
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Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1970 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.

Last edited by dsk; 04-03-2020 at 11:05 PM.
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  #35  
Old 04-05-2020, 09:53 AM
ouluckydogu ouluckydogu is offline
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What nine did you settle on? Browning also make a baby 1911 in .380 that the wife and kid can use.

Lucky
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  #36  
Old 04-06-2020, 04:17 PM
covid-1911 covid-1911 is offline
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Originally Posted by ouluckydogu View Post
What nine did you settle on? Browning also make a baby 1911 in .380 that the wife and kid can use.

Lucky
It's a Rock Island 1911-A1 GI Standard 9mm. I could have gotten their Rock Ultra FS, but I prefer the looks of the GI model.
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  #37  
Old 04-06-2020, 04:34 PM
covid-1911 covid-1911 is offline
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Well, the 9mm didn't get delivered to the FFL today, because they are closed on Mondays. Mean while, the Browning suddenly showed up at the other FFL and will be ready for pick up tomorrow.

Should I clean the .22LR Browning first or is it ready to shoot? I plan to get familiar with the disassembly/assembly before taking it to the shooting range.

I have already memorized the 4 safety rules and trying to practice the 1st rule in my head for now. That should help speed up my session with the range instructor...I guess?
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  #38  
Old 04-06-2020, 07:51 PM
Lazer131 Lazer131 is offline
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I would advise cleaning your new firearms and to function check the pistols without ammo being present. Become familiar with operating the slide, safety and magazine release before you ever decide to head to the range. You can dry fire your 9mm as much as you want but follow all safety rules every time you handle your new firearms.
When you first go to the range, as a beginner, load only one cartridge at a time to reduce chances of mistakes. It will help you become familiar with the operation and recoil of your pistols... I'm not a expert on anything but this is how I taught my family members when they were new to the sport. Do as you please and enjoy your new firearms. Congrats !
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  #39  
Old 04-06-2020, 08:43 PM
John Joseph John Joseph is offline
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A first handgun wants to be a .22. Really.

OTOH hundreds of thousands of scrawny young kids just out of High School learned to shoot .45 1911s just fine.

You'll have a greater advantage than they did since you have the time and the opportunity for personalized instruction---those scrawny kids had to hurry off and fight in a war.

PMC 230 grain FMJ is what I'd recommend for learning learning to dance with Madam Slabsides---probably the best QC product for an economical price out there.
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  #40  
Old 04-07-2020, 02:19 PM
covid-1911 covid-1911 is offline
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So, the Browning 1911-22 is the first to get to me. I have read somewhere that a rimfire gun should not be dry fired. But I have seen a video of this Browning where the user dry fires it. Is this pistol exempt from that rule?
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  #41  
Old 04-07-2020, 02:51 PM
chrysanthemum chrysanthemum is offline
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If you choose to go the .22 direction, which is certainly sound advice (even if not the only reasonable choice), I'm not sure I'd lock myself into a 1911 look alike that's been adjusted to fire .22 rounds.

There are some fine target/marksmanship grade .22 pistols that are designed from the ground up for the .22 cartridge.

I think those deserve as much if not more consideration than a 1911 that's been retro-engineered to fire .22 cartridges.

---

There will always be those who believe that "old wisdom", such as dry fire advice as to rimfire doesn't apply to them. Still, if the hammer and/or FP strikes against hard steel then it is difficult to argue that there's no impact. A person can choose for himself whether such repeated impacts are desireable. https://www.nrafamily.org/articles/2...yths-exploded/. See item #5

Now, dry firing on a dummy cartridge is a different matter... someone making a YouTube video just might have inserted a dummy cartridge, but without saying a word about it. You never know....
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Last edited by chrysanthemum; 04-07-2020 at 03:09 PM.
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