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  #1  
Old 12-23-2019, 09:50 PM
1911crazy 1911crazy is offline
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Slide looseness

I inspected my norinco build closely before I built it measuring the frame rails and slide dimensions. The frame rails are parallel and even the whole length. There seems to be more looseness in the front of the slde. Knowing my frame rails are good. Iím thinking the slide is worn in the grooves or it spread.? Even though it came out very accurate Iíd like to know what causes this looseness.
I purchased the tools from brownells to swage the frame rails but the problem is in the slide grooves. To tighten up the slide grooves I have the exact width of the frame rails in a gauge. Iím thinking about installing the gauge and put the slide in a vise with soft jaws and heat it a tad.? Should I do it or leave it alone because itís so accurate?

Iím thinking the recoil spring as it coils up as it cycles it puts a horizontal side pressure on the slide grooves causing this wear or spread?

Any thoughts?
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  #2  
Old 12-23-2019, 11:22 PM
pat_jones pat_jones is online now
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The slide to frame fit is not all that important to accuracy. The sights are connected to the slide, barrel to slide fit is the important part. Leave it alone.

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  #3  
Old 12-24-2019, 04:17 AM
Totally Tactical Totally Tactical is offline
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I would leave it alone. I have quite a few 1911's that the slide has play in it,but the guns are very accurate.
If you swage the rails, you may crack a rail. and once it is swage the slide will have to be relapped back to fit the slide.
And it may get play back in it over time.

Last edited by Totally Tactical; 12-25-2019 at 04:05 AM.
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  #4  
Old 12-24-2019, 04:36 AM
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Johnny handgun Johnny handgun is offline
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Leave it alone lest he fix it until it’s broken
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  #5  
Old 12-24-2019, 06:29 AM
DesmoAndrew DesmoAndrew is offline
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As others have noted, a loose slide doesn't always lead to an inaccurate pistol (at least in a non bullseye pro level).

I have a Colt Ser 70 repro that has a relatively loose slide. But I added an EGW bushing to tighten up the barrel-to-bushing and bushing-to-slide fit. The barrel locks up fairly tight vertically in the rear. So the items with control the relation of the barrel to the slides/sights are fairly tight.

The result is a pistol which is quite accurate. At least as accurate as any of my 60's era Colt National Matches.
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  #6  
Old 12-24-2019, 09:07 AM
TRSOtto TRSOtto is offline
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Squeezing the slide is a good way to crack it.

If you REALLY want to tighten it up you can have the rails welded and machine them to the exact dimensions you need to match the slide, or you can have a set of Accurails fit to the gun.

IMHO....it's a Norinco. I wouldn't spend another dime on it.
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  #7  
Old 12-24-2019, 09:44 AM
SV 22 SV 22 is online now
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Some manufacturers intentionally open up the front of the slide, so that when recoiling there is less resistance. While the gun is locked up, everything is tight.
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  #8  
Old 12-24-2019, 01:33 PM
Wa Jim Wa Jim is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SV 22 View Post
Some manufacturers intentionally open up the front of the slide, so that when recoiling there is less resistance. While the gun is locked up, everything is tight.

Not that I know/seen everything but this is the first I've heard of this practice....
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  #9  
Old 12-24-2019, 07:49 PM
SV 22 SV 22 is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wa Jim View Post
Not that I know/seen everything but this is the first I've heard of this practice....
I first read about this a while ago on the old 1911pro.com forum. I remeasured two Caspian slides. I found that forward of the lock back notch the slide was .006 wider than at the rear of the slide.
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  #10  
Old 12-24-2019, 08:15 PM
Rock185 Rock185 is offline
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I would not be squeezing the slide of a gun you say is already "very accurate". I've considered doing that to a gun or two over the years, but even if done properly there is much to lose and little to gain.....
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  #11  
Old 12-24-2019, 10:03 PM
Infidel525 Infidel525 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1911crazy View Post
Should I do it or leave it alone because itís so accurate?



Iím thinking the recoil spring as it coils up as it cycles it puts a horizontal side pressure on the slide grooves causing this wear or spread?



Any thoughts?
You answered your question, it's accurate so why screw it up?

As far as your thought on the recoil spring putting enough pressure on the slide to cause the looseness you are just noticing now, do you have a 500 lb spring in it ?



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Last edited by Infidel525; 12-25-2019 at 02:06 PM.
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  #12  
Old 12-25-2019, 01:50 AM
1911crazy 1911crazy is offline
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I purchased it used with high mileage. I seen pics of gunsmiths peining the rails to tighten them but I’m not going there. I’ll pass on touching the rails and try my swc target reloads.
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Last edited by 1911crazy; 12-25-2019 at 01:56 AM.
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  #13  
Old 12-25-2019, 03:00 AM
Rwehavinfunyet Rwehavinfunyet is offline
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Loose slide on a 1911

If a shooter uses a firm grip on a 1911, when the gun fires, the pistol moves up and back....which places more stress on the front of the frame rails.... Over time, the front rails may get more loose, and the slide may even "rattle" if the gun is shaken. I do not like a slide that rattles....even though a good slide to frame fit may only contribute about 10-15% when doing an accuracy job on a 1911.....

I have used my MIG welder with Argon gas to place "weld tabs" on the top of the rails at the front of the frame, but only on the outside edge of the top of the rails.... I only do one rail at a time, use files to shape the weld tab, and use the slide to check to see if the slide will fit on the rail. I only place a small amount of weld on the top of the rail, perhaps 1/4" in length and about 1/8" across, which I shape with files....I then do the same procedure to the top of the opposite rail.

I have done this to two 1911 frames, but it did allow a much better slide to frame fit and eliminated the "rattle." The total time to fit the slide with the frame weld tabs was an estimated 30-35 minutes.... I am not sure if it helped to improve the accuracy, since I did not test it for 50 yard shots in a rest, but it did eliminate the rattle of a loose slide! This was not done to my competition handguns, so they did not get a high volume of shooting, but both guns were capable of shooting 5-shot groups of roughly two inches at 25 yards from a sandbag rest.....and I eventually sold the guns...

Last edited by Rwehavinfunyet; 12-25-2019 at 03:05 AM.
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  #14  
Old 12-25-2019, 04:09 AM
Totally Tactical Totally Tactical is offline
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I would think with the chance of cracking slide or frame, and the question of the quaility of metals.

Tig welding and fitting the frame rails or Accurails would be the better choice.
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  #15  
Old 12-25-2019, 07:15 PM
Magnumite Magnumite is offline
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Remove the barrel, bushing, recoil parts. Clean the oil and grease off the slide and frame rails. Place the slide on the frame in battery position and measure the lateral and vertical clearance at the front and rear of the rails using a dial indcator. This will put an actual value to the clearances present. FWIW, the Ruger CMD I own has clearances of around .0040 - .0043” in all four dimensions and is a 2” @ 25 yard gun with the stock barrel, which has a good factory fit.
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  #16  
Old 12-25-2019, 09:18 PM
Jacobconroy75 Jacobconroy75 is offline
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Just thought I'd mention this...it might not pertain to your situation and keep in mind that I'm pretty new at the 1911 thing.

I bought a second-hand Wilson CQB and later noticed that the front of the slide was pretty darned loose side to side. So much that it bothered me. Just didn't enjoy the pistol because of it.

Last week I finally got around to replacing all the springs in the CQB and viola! The slide feels like it should now with just a little bit of play that I consider to be acceptable. The recoil spring that it came with was a good inch shorter than a new 13 lbs. spring (9mm).

Anyway, you might try a new recoil spring. I couldn't believe the difference.
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