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  #1  
Old 01-09-2020, 07:56 AM
CharlieLima CharlieLima is offline
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FN High Power WWII Bring Back

So, my Father in Law's dad was a WWII, Korea and Nam US Army Veteran. I got to meet him once before he passed away. Not very talkative as one would guess. He did speak to me a little once he found out I am a US Army OIF vet. Anyways, my Father In Law told me about a handgun that his dad brought back from WWII and left to him when he died. I finally asked him to bring it over to the house and found out it is the High Power you see below.

From what he remembers, his dad told him he took it off of a Nazi Lt. He has the orinal grips somewhere, but thinks one is broken. The Pacmyer grips were put one since his dad was using it for home defense up until he died. I convinced him to leave it with me so I could go through it and clean it up to ensure it is preserved. From what research I have done it looks like it is a FN factory German occupation made gun since it has no magizine dissconnect safety. That matched the details my Father in Law said that his dad told him he got it in 1943 or 1944.

Overall it is in pretty good shape I think. Just wish the original grips were on it. You high Power experts chime in if you have more details! I tried to take close ups of markings I found on it.












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  #2  
Old 01-09-2020, 08:39 AM
scubadad scubadad is offline
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Very nice. You may want the Mods to move this to the high power section. Lots of knowledge over there and some don't venture here too often.
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  #3  
Old 01-09-2020, 09:40 AM
Ranger566 Ranger566 is offline
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As a minimum, showing it's serial number will get the discussion started.
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  #4  
Old 01-09-2020, 10:30 AM
Jim Watson Jim Watson is offline
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Looks like you need some well worn walnut grips to "correct" it.
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  #5  
Old 01-09-2020, 12:26 PM
TNorris TNorris is offline
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Yes... reveal the serial number!

I recently purchased an occupation model that I estimate was produced in April of '43. The original grips are dry and brittle and the sear spring was completely shot. After replacing a few parts to make it safe, it shoots quite well.

I've retained all the original parts for posterity...
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  #6  
Old 01-09-2020, 03:09 PM
crasig crasig is offline
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Used FEG HP Grips are difficult to distinguish from originals, & less expensive.
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  #7  
Old 01-09-2020, 03:31 PM
CharlieLima CharlieLima is offline
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Well, looks like I missed photo. Here is the side with serial number. I can't make it out very good, so I will ask my father in law to look at the pistol and tell me.

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  #8  
Old 01-09-2020, 04:15 PM
TNorris TNorris is offline
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Looks like it's #458964a.

Though it is nearly impossible to know for sure, it may have been produced in mid May, 1943. Mine (#25342a) would have been produced in early March 1943.

Photos were taken at the store before I picked it up, and before a good cleaning. The rough finish of the two is similar.
Attached Thumbnails
Nazi HP 003.jpg   Nazi HP 005.jpg  
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  #9  
Old 01-09-2020, 09:43 PM
voodooranger voodooranger is offline
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that is so cool op
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  #10  
Old 01-09-2020, 09:56 PM
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dsk dsk is offline
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Given the occasional spots of pitting on it I suspect he took steel wool to it to clean off some rust, and eventually took off the finish as well. Either that or he tried some naval jelly on it, which is just as good at removing bluing as rust (after all, bluing IS a controlled form of rust).

By the way, you will often hear gun shop commandos and Internet experts tell you that these occupation-era guns were often purposely sabotaged at the factory and thus dangerous to fire. It's absolute bullcrap. As long as it's in good mechanical condition it should be fine. The Nazis were well aware of the possibility of sabotage in the many occupied factories they oversaw, and they took great pains to make sure everyone did their job and didn't get out of line. To do otherwise could often be fatal. While incidents of sabotage did indeed happen, they were sporadic and usually involved something that would be difficult to trace back to the culprits, lest they pay dearly for it later. One incident I'm aware of was a Focke-Wulf FW-190A that had garbage left inside its engine oil pump, causing it to later have engine trouble and crash in Russia. That plane was salvaged during the 1990s and restored, and is now flying around up here in WA state.
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  #11  
Old 01-09-2020, 11:22 PM
KDKSAIL KDKSAIL is offline
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The dating of your WW II vintage H-P seems about right. There are still traces of the original Waffen stamps and 'Eagle' (which may've become less pronounced/dulled by removing the original finish). If you decide to re-finish this specimen...be careful to retain what little of these stampings that have survived.
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