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  #1  
Old 12-07-2006, 10:10 AM
Bill Hasty Bill Hasty is offline
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What is the best method to polish out the teeny tiny

scratches in stainless. Many thanks
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  #2  
Old 12-07-2006, 10:52 AM
OD* OD* is offline
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I like Flitz.
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  #3  
Old 12-07-2006, 02:12 PM
Chuck S Chuck S is offline
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Mine are bead blasted, not polished so the pistol shows few scratches and cares even less about them, they're part of what happens when I holster or shoot the critter.

Bead blasting the whole pistol is a good preventive.

-- Chuck
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  #4  
Old 12-07-2006, 04:14 PM
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dsk dsk is offline
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Flitz, Simoniz, or any other metal polish that specifically mentions stainless steel on its label will work. My favorite kind is the so-called "wadding polish" that's basically compound impregnated into cotton. I forget the maker's name, but I've bought it from hardware stores in the past.
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Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1970 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.
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  #5  
Old 12-07-2006, 04:29 PM
Coltnstein Coltnstein is offline
 
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Nevr-dull. We used tons of that stuff on brass back when I was in the Navy. I see the can has changed.

http://www.nevrdull.com/
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  #6  
Old 12-07-2006, 06:37 PM
HotToyz HotToyz is offline
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Stainless

I use a 3-M Scotch Bright pad on the Sides of mine (Not On The Bead Blasted Area) and it removes ALL light scratches. Go with the already in place Grain. And have removed a few HEAVY scratches.

If you use Flitz or Semi Chrome type Polishes or such, You add slick shiney spots. I use these type polishes only on my Already Bright High Polished Stainless guns.
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Old 12-07-2006, 07:27 PM
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dsk dsk is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coltnstein
Nevr-dull. We used tons of that stuff on brass back when I was in the Navy. I see the can has changed.

http://www.nevrdull.com/
Nevr-Dull, that's it! Great stuff.
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Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1970 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.
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  #8  
Old 12-12-2006, 07:17 PM
TraderJack TraderJack is offline
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I have polished many scratches out of SS guns including the perverbial "idiot" mark made by an improperly installed slide stop.
Guns are machines so they're going to show some wear if they're being used, but if you insist on removing every little scratch, here are my "secrets" -

1. Go slow and be patient. This is going to take some time, so don't rush the job. Set aside a block of time so you can concentrate and do a good job.

2. Always follow the grain of the existing factory polishing. Any abrasive polishing that goes against the grain will only make matters worse and call attention to a poorly executed job.

3. Never use more than you need. Be attentive to the pressure you apply to the polishing cloth. It should be firm and constant for whatever type polishing you will be doing. Start with a good polish like Flitz then move on to something coarser if needed. Go coarser only if necessary! Crocus cloth is a good choice for most scratches.

4. Make your fingerprints the last mark you remove. After you're satisfied with scratch removal use a silicone cloth or something similar to handle the pistol and wipe it down.

Now, you can never touch the pistol again! (just kidding, of course)

Regards,
TraderJack
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  #9  
Old 12-12-2006, 09:01 PM
DHart DHart is offline
 
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Following on Hottoyz & Trader Jack...

Start with Scotchbrite pads going with the grain on brushed polished areas. (The significant problem with matte bead blasted areas is that you can't remove marks on matte areas without re-doing the bead blasting!) But brush polished areas are very easy to refresh. Stop after using the Scotchbrite pads if you want an open grain brushed finish.

NEVER use steel wool... it will embed rust prone carbon steel particles into your stainless steel and start a rust-fest!

After the Scotchbrite pads, IF you want to smooth out & provide a higher degree of polish/brightness, then use Flitz on a soft cotton cloth. Flitz Fiberglass & Metal polish (silver tube with blue lettering) works well on both stainess & factory blued surfaces, but while it is safe for factory blued finishes, go rarely and very easy on blued finishes. Always read the label! There are many different Flitz products.

Here's a stainless S&W which -when I bought it- had many scuffs, scratches, abrasions from years of being carried & handled. It was dingy, dirty and looked beat up! After an evening of Scotchbrite pads followed by Flitz on a soft cotton cloth it looks like this:





Brushed-polished stainless finishes are very easy to refresh and keep looking fantastic.

Last edited by DHart; 12-12-2006 at 09:04 PM.
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  #10  
Old 12-13-2006, 09:04 AM
Tackleberi Tackleberi is offline
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The green, "heavy-duty" ScotchBrite pads as seen here (http://www.3m.com/us/home_leisure/sc...scouring.html), gently applied in the direction of the existing "grain" on the stainless does a wonderful job of bringing back a near-factory finish. It is nearly impossible to over-do it, although you might want to try it on an inconspicuous spot first.

I use it on my Seecamps all the time, as well. Perfect match for the factory finish on the Seecamp, as well as the Colt.

Finally, although off-topic, the green Scotch-Brite puts a nice finish on the back of iPods.............
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  #11  
Old 12-13-2006, 07:52 PM
potthawg potthawg is offline
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When I grow up....

I wanna be half the photog that DHart is.
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