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  #1  
Old 01-30-2020, 04:35 PM
Dan13 Dan13 is online now
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Takedown Tool

I acquired a vintage 1911 takedown tool. Seems pretty straight forward, but in searching the internet I am not finding instruction on its use. Was there a manual or instructions, or it was so obvious no instructions were required?
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  #2  
Old 01-30-2020, 05:35 PM
TFLeader TFLeader is offline
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Photo please
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  #3  
Old 01-30-2020, 07:38 PM
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dsk dsk is offline
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The only "tool" I'm aware of is the little L-shaped Stanley screwdriver. With that little thing you can completely tear down a 1911, as well as using parts like the sear spring to help you along.
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  #4  
Old 01-30-2020, 07:49 PM
Dan13 Dan13 is online now
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It is exactly like the Stanley L shaped tool, but is pre war with no markings and blued. Flathead screwdriver on the short end of the L and a punch on the long end of the L. Seems simplistic and self explainatory, but just surprised there is no instructions on how to use this on the internet.
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  #5  
Old 01-30-2020, 08:30 PM
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dsk dsk is offline
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Well..... in all honesty, if you need instructions on how to use an L-shaped screwdriver/punch I'd say you're already in over your head.
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Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1970 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.
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  #6  
Old 01-31-2020, 12:11 AM
stan2 stan2 is offline
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takedown tool ?

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two 38's & trivia 151 (2)-2.jpg  
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  #7  
Old 01-31-2020, 03:54 AM
Dan13 Dan13 is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dsk View Post
Well..... in all honesty, if you need instructions on how to use an L-shaped screwdriver/punch I'd say you're already in over your head. [IMG class=inlineimg]https://forums.1911forum.com/images/smilies/wink.gif[/IMG]
Ha, You are right, of course. As I said in my original post, I know it is self explanatory for the most part, but was not sure if there were tips or tricks with this tool other than the straightforward use of a screwdriver on the grips and a punch on the pins that a manual of sorts would expose.
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  #8  
Old 01-31-2020, 03:55 AM
Dan13 Dan13 is online now
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Originally Posted by stan2 View Post
takedown tool ?

Yes sir, that L shaped tool in your pic is what I have.
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  #9  
Old 01-31-2020, 04:33 PM
Fordpuller Fordpuller is offline
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They're cool just to have, but there are far better tools out there for taking down a 1911. After awhile of using the punch end of the tool you're gonna notice they'll start maring the concave end of the msh pin.
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  #10  
Old 01-31-2020, 06:07 PM
mkk41 mkk41 is offline
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Always wondered why the US Army never thought to put a pouch for the take-down tool and perhaps cleaning rod , built into the holster like every other military in the world?
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  #11  
Old 01-31-2020, 09:33 PM
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Originally Posted by stan2 View Post
takedown tool ?

Good grief, now I know why they've been so hard to find lately... YOU'VE got 'em all!
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Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1970 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.
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  #12  
Old 01-31-2020, 09:38 PM
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Originally Posted by mkk41 View Post
Always wondered why the US Army never thought to put a pouch for the take-down tool and perhaps cleaning rod , built into the holster like every other military in the world?
In all likelihood they figured it wasn't necessary. Unlike a lot of the world's armies the US military always had an excellent support infrastructure, with repair depots not far behind the front lines and an availability of spare weapons and parts so vast it was often easier to just throw stuff away rather than try to repair it. Therefore there probably wasn't much need for a soldier to pack around repair tools and cleaning kits for his secondary weapon. Instead they had that metal box full of rods and tools that were issued to the entire squad.
__________________
Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1970 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.
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  #13  
Old 02-02-2020, 04:02 AM
stan2 stan2 is offline
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Are they really that hard to find ?



Threw a few in this old box a few years ago,---and...



They just seem to multiply....



(Or,---maybe if they like you,...they just follow you home )
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  #14  
Old 02-02-2020, 06:36 AM
mkk41 mkk41 is offline
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Originally Posted by dsk View Post
Instead they had that metal box full of rods and tools that were issued to the entire squad.

That never made any sense to me either. Not everyone in a squad carried a sidearm. Who carried the 'kit' and what happened if he got hit?

Ya could use a section of .30cal rod I suppose.
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