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  #1  
Old 01-10-2017, 12:43 AM
AndyF AndyF is offline
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Long term storage for loading dies.

I am moving to the Pacific coast and I need ideas to protect my dies for possibly a year long period of storage. I want to use something to treat the dies that will be easy to remove, and still keep the dies from rusting in the high humidity. I was thinking about maybe using a synthetic bearing grease and wrap each die in saran wrap and put them back in their cases. Does anyone have any other suggestions that might be better than grease? I do worry that grease might be a pain to clean off the dies when it's time to put them back to use. Thank you in advance.
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  #2  
Old 01-10-2017, 01:41 AM
drail drail is offline
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Breakfree Collector. Google it. Prevents corrosion for 5 years with one application. I have been using it on my safe queens for about 15 years now and it does not turn to varnish and has prevented any rusting. My safe does not contain any kind of Goldenrod or heater - just dessicant packs. Grease WOULD be far too much trouble to remove and it's not necessary anyway. I use it on my Lee dies and store them on a shelf in the plastic container they came in. Apply a thin coat with a small paint brush. Just check the dies (or guns) every once in a while. Pull them out and wipe them off with a rag and they're ready to go. If you can't find any Breakfree Collector then use Cosmoline - but will be a pain in the ass to remove. Regular auto bearing grease will turn to a sticky solid over time if exposed to air.

Last edited by drail; 01-10-2017 at 02:16 AM.
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  #3  
Old 01-10-2017, 02:00 AM
K1500 K1500 is offline
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I have dies sitting on the shelf with nothing for more than a year. Heck, they probably sat in inventory longer than that. If I was worried I would either spray them with barricade or Hornady one shot. Probably barricade.
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  #4  
Old 01-10-2017, 02:12 AM
drail drail is offline
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You need to use something formulated for long term storage. Most oils will evaporate away over time and fail to protect or turn to varnish which will require something like lacquer thinner or carburetor cleaner to remove. Placing the metal to be protected in an air tight container is helpful but if you do that you should use a dessicant in case the air you trapped in the container contains much moisture.
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  #5  
Old 01-10-2017, 07:00 AM
TjB101 TjB101 is offline
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Desiccant pack and a vacuum sealer. Create nice tight, storage packs of your dies and other reloading tools.


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  #6  
Old 01-10-2017, 08:08 AM
springer99 springer99 is offline
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For long term protection, I'd suggest you look at VCI (vapor corrosion inhibitor) products. I used them exclusively in the electrical industry for many years when we had to store electrical/electronic equipment in damp/outdoor environments long term, where they were constantly exposed to thermal changes that introduced moisture. Even when moisture did get inside the equipment, there was not corrosion at all.

I'd suggest that you clean the dies well and spray them with a wax-type productive coating like Hornady OneShot, wrap them in some VCI paper and store them in a suitable case.

They won't tarnish or rust at all.
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  #7  
Old 01-10-2017, 09:18 AM
Laudanum Laudanum is offline
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Maybe wipe them down with a little Corrosion X. I noticed a few small spots of surface rust on the outside of a couple of dies that mostly sit on the shelf and dont get used much. I cleaned it off and wiped some Corrosion X on them and haven't noticed any more issues. There probably are better products for long term storage but the Corrosion X worked in my situation.

I like the vacuum seal idea but if I didn't own one (I dont), I dont think I would buy one just for the purpose of storing dies for a move. If you aren't going to vacuum seal them, I know they sell the VCI inhibitor "chips". I wonder if they can be cut up into small enough pieces to fit in the die container. I haven't used any of the VCI stuff but I hear it works great.
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  #8  
Old 01-10-2017, 10:30 AM
K1500 K1500 is offline
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I believe hornady dies come with a vci chip in the box. I left it in the box.
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  #9  
Old 01-10-2017, 10:33 AM
yeti yeti is offline
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I like Boeshield T-9 or BreakFree Collector for storage. Typically neither requires much (if any) removal to put the item back into service.
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  #10  
Old 01-10-2017, 10:45 AM
jglenn jglenn is offline
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pieces of this work well inside the box

http://www.brownells.com/gunsmith-to...-prod1197.aspx

I also use these in all my die boxes.

http://www.brownells.com/gunsmith-to...-prod1207.aspx

then seal the box.. the little squares work very well .. I've used them for years
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  #11  
Old 01-10-2017, 12:26 PM
july19 july19 is offline
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I'd wrap the Gunwrap around the die(s) and seal them in a meal sealer.
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  #12  
Old 01-10-2017, 12:34 PM
Cannibul Cannibul is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jglenn View Post
pieces of this work well inside the box

http://www.brownells.com/gunsmith-to...-prod1197.aspx

I also use these in all my die boxes.

http://www.brownells.com/gunsmith-to...-prod1207.aspx

then seal the box.. the little squares work very well .. I've used them for years

Or go to Amazon and save money.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

When we moved I purchased a whole roll of the paper for about $35.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
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  #13  
Old 01-10-2017, 12:43 PM
Busa Dave Busa Dave is offline
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Very easy---I do this with my custom dies just to be sure. Sometimes go years without using them.

Current process--take apart die, spray lightly with CLP, wipe off excess on outside, then vacuum seal just like a steak. Have to pay attention so the vacuum (shut off early) does not cause the plastic bag to rip in sharp parts of the die assy..
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  #14  
Old 01-10-2017, 01:31 PM
dreadi dreadi is online now
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How about dropping them in a container of new motor oil? When you're done storing them, take them out and immerse them in acetone until the oil is out, then a light coat of lube.
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  #15  
Old 01-10-2017, 09:50 PM
july19 july19 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dreadi View Post
How about dropping them in a container of new motor oil? When you're done storing them, take them out and immerse them in acetone until the oil is out, then a light coat of lube.
The opening in a quart size oil "bottle" may be to small to accept a die. If large enough it may be a good solution; the five qt container may be necessary. Dropping them on top of each other could damage the threads and the oil may remove the white paint on Redding competition bullet seater and / or the micrometer taper crimp die.
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  #16  
Old 01-10-2017, 10:14 PM
AndyF AndyF is offline
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That's why I asked you guys. You're a smart bunch here. I knew someone would have the answer. I even have a vacuum sealer. A Zrust tab vacuum sealed with a die set should work great. Another advantage is that I can visually check them down the road. Thanks to everyone that replied.
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  #17  
Old 01-10-2017, 11:11 PM
Zedbra Zedbra is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yeti View Post
I like Boeshield T-9
This is really good stuff for preventing rust - I spray it twice per year on truck's coil-overs and I have no rust on the bodies. Boeshieldis also used a lot by woodworkers, helping to keep dust out of their tools.
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  #18  
Old 01-10-2017, 11:22 PM
USMM guy USMM guy is online now
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Boeshield is great stuff, I use it for this and that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zedbra View Post
This is really good stuff for preventing rust - I spray it twice per year on truck's coil-overs and I have no rust on the bodies. Boeshieldis also used a lot by woodworkers, helping to keep dust out of their tools.
The OP mentioned the Pacific Northwest. To me this reads cold and wet. I do not know how you will be set up. But if you are going to set up in a heated shop. You should really give some consideration to a wood stove. I have a Jotul in my 1,800 square foot shop where I do everything, reloading included. And it gets fairly moist here in the Blue ridge mountains. The dry heat from that wood stove keeps the relative humidity quite low. I never have issues from corrosion with any of my tools, guns, reloading equipment, whatever in my shop. Something to consider.
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Old 01-10-2017, 11:30 PM
Zedbra Zedbra is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by USMM guy View Post
The OP mentioned the Pacific Northwest. To me this reads cold and wet. I do not know how you will be set up. But if you are going to set up in a heated shop. You should really give some consideration to a wood stove. I have a Jotul in my 1,800 square foot shop where I do everything, reloading included. And it gets fairly moist here in the Blue ridge mountains. The dry heat from that wood stove keeps the relative humidity quite low. I never have issues from corrosion with any of my tools, guns, reloading equipment, whatever in my shop. Something to consider.
My location is the Pacific Northwest - just more north, more rain, more wet. Adding a wood stove is a far stretch from asking what protectent works best.
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  #20  
Old 01-11-2017, 12:04 AM
USMM guy USMM guy is online now
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You are of course correct.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zedbra View Post
My location is the Pacific Northwest - just more north, more rain, more wet. Adding a wood stove is a far stretch from asking what protectent works best.
I guess that I did get a little off topic there. Sorry if I offended anyone.
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  #21  
Old 01-11-2017, 12:20 PM
Cannibul Cannibul is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by USMM guy View Post
The OP mentioned the Pacific Northwest. To me this reads cold and wet. I do not know how you will be set up. But if you are going to set up in a heated shop. You should really give some consideration to a wood stove. I have a Jotul in my 1,800 square foot shop where I do everything, reloading included. And it gets fairly moist here in the Blue ridge mountains. The dry heat from that wood stove keeps the relative humidity quite low. I never have issues from corrosion with any of my tools, guns, reloading equipment, whatever in my shop. Something to consider.
I had my reloading stuff in a garage with my climate control in Portland for years. I had less rust then than I get in a month here in Texas.
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  #22  
Old 01-11-2017, 07:47 PM
july19 july19 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zedbra View Post
This is really good stuff for preventing rust - I spray it twice per year on truck's coil-overs and I have no rust on the bodies. Boeshieldis also used a lot by woodworkers, helping to keep dust out of their tools.
T9 Boeshield is an underappeciated product, safe on melonite too. I use it on dies, threads and bodies, locks, hinges, pistols, etc...
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  #23  
Old 01-11-2017, 09:04 PM
techiede44 techiede44 is offline
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I'm in the PNW and reload in a detached garage w/no heat or ac all year long - ok, a space heater in the winter.

None of my dies have ever showed any rust. Whenever I finish reloading a caliber I clean the dies with hornady one shot dry lube which leaves a protective coating.
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  #24  
Old 01-12-2017, 01:47 AM
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Taroman Taroman is offline
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Here on the wet side, Boeshield T9 is a good answer.
Also have have had good results with Eezox.
My dies are all stored in their turrets in the round Lee boxes, which helps, too.
Just forget WD40!
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