Growth of enthusiasts' interest in the 1911 - 1911Forum
1911Forum
Advertise Here
Forum   Reviews   Rules   Legal   Site Supporters & Donations   Advertise


Go Back   1911Forum > >

Notices


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 03-28-2020, 09:01 PM
peacebutready peacebutready is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Southwest U.S.
Posts: 1,245
Growth of enthusiasts' interest in the 1911

I know starting in the mid 1990s there was the 10 year hi-cap magazine ban. Is that the most prominant reason interest in the 1911 went up?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 03-28-2020, 09:29 PM
Jason D Jason D is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Keller, TX
Posts: 4,116
That's what's always been claimed.

I suspect it had more to do with companies cranking out cheap guns with all the bells and whistles, without the need to sink hundreds more dollars into a gun to get them.

The sale price for a Kimber Custom Classic in 1999 was about 600 bucks. The Springfield Loaded models at the time were 599 and 619 for a parked and stainless respectively.
__________________
1911forum member #7
ACCEPT NOTHING LESS THAN FULL VICTORY!"
General Dwight D. Eisenhower June 6, 1944
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 03-28-2020, 09:44 PM
TucsonRick TucsonRick is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 247
I think also the collective work of people such as Jeff Cooper (and others), and the FBI selection of the 1911 (Springfield Pro) with all the publicity and status of that and similar selections (LAPD selections, etc, etc).
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #4  
Old 03-28-2020, 10:00 PM
dsk's Avatar
dsk dsk is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Posts: 70,105
With the 10-round limit in place interest in high-capacity 9mm pistols waned, except for some models like Glocks for which tons of pre-ban magazines were still available. The 1911 did benefit from it, but so did 10-shot .40 S&W pistols as well as revolvers.

Once the ban was lifted not only did high-cap 9mm pistols make a comeback, but the demand for their ammo coupled with the high production rate of 9mm ammunition to meet the needs of the War on Terror meant that prices dropped like a rock. Today interest in the 1911 is on a steady decline, due in no small part to the fact that everybody wants a modern high-cap pistol or lightweight carry gun instead. If we end up with another magazine limit however I suspect either the .45 1911 will again increase in popularity and/or small 10-shot 9mms like the SIG P365 and Glock 48 will reign supreme.
__________________
Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1970 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 03-28-2020, 10:07 PM
JLS1911 JLS1911 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2019
Posts: 156
I think it might have something to do with feel, ease of fire and looks. To me, a "plastic" gun really doesn't feel like like a gun. Don't get me wrong there are tons of polymer guns that are great tools but I haven't had one in my hands yet that actually felt like a gun. Triggers on a 1911 are just so easy and crisp it makes them much easier to shoot and stay on target. And let's face it, they really are way cooler looking than most any other pistols out there. Of course this is just my opinion but these are just three of the reasons that come to mind. I could go on and on but I won't bore everyone with my old man soap box theory. Be safe and well my friends.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 03-28-2020, 10:42 PM
Old Grey Hare Old Grey Hare is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Location: Some still-quiet little town in So. Fla.
Posts: 500
PFffft no.

A 1911 is a machined bit of barstock. It's a precision instrument, like a spring-driven watch.

Ther's something that can't quite put in to words about how it feels to shoot an old-school gun.

And this one, this one has a trigger that makes rifles blush in envy. The 1911 is a pistolero's pistol. A marksan's pistol. I can't think of a sweeter trigger.

If this thing were a coffeemaker, it'd be a Piccola Europa. 3 foot lever, pressure gauge. You gotta keep the needle in the sweet spot as you pour your shot.

The 1911? You master the trigger press, she *will* hit where you aim. All the stories of jam-o-matics are just ham-fisted people that couldn't drive a stickshift even if you nailed the instruction manual to their forehad, buying fashionista hi-dollar guns. A proper 1911 rattles like a maracca.... but the barrel-to-slide interface? That's rock-solid. That and a good trigger is *all* that matters. The rest... is up to *you*.

The 1911 will always be a thing, because she was the first... and to my brain, *still* the best.

Why shoot twice? Because you can't aim. And you can't aim because you got too much ammo.

Train like a marksman, shoot like a marksman. One shot. One kill. No @[email protected]$ excuses.

This goes for rifle and pistol and bow and arrow and fists, too. Don't. Miss.

Make *every* round count.
__________________
Beware any government intent on disarming its people
-----------------v--------------
[SOAP] [BALLOT] [JURY] [AMMO]
-----------------^--------------
Member NRA, GOA, SAF, VCDL, FL Carry
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 03-28-2020, 10:46 PM
dsk's Avatar
dsk dsk is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Posts: 70,105
Unfortunately the younger shooters don't appreciate the 1911 like we older shooters do. It wasn't the service pistol during their watch, is seldom seen in action films and just doesn't hold enough ammo to satisfy their short attention spans.
__________________
Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1970 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 03-28-2020, 10:49 PM
Archie Archie is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Hastings, Nebraska - The Heartland!
Age: 70
Posts: 425
I carry full time a Government Model variation, a Colt Commander (LW) in .45 ACP. The 10 round limitation didn't affect me much, as I had long prior decided first hit counted more than a fusillade of wild shots into the air.

Old Grey Hare speaks well and I see no reason to repeat it.
__________________
If God had intended autopistols to be double action, or plastic, He would have had John Moses Browning design it that way in the first place.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 03-28-2020, 11:12 PM
JLS1911 JLS1911 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2019
Posts: 156
I have to agree with dsk to a point. The younger ones do tend to gravitate towards the newer lighter Hollywood guns until and if they are fortunate enough to be able to get a 1911 in their hands. I have seen it with my own eyes. The look on their faces and the joy in their eyes are unexplainable. At least the three that I have witnessed. Then they begin to realize that maybe the old farts aren't just a gaggle of blubbering idiots.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 03-29-2020, 12:10 AM
SC shooter SC shooter is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: In the pines
Age: 60
Posts: 1,266
The 1911 is a beautiful and historic American Icon why not be interested in it. If you don't appreciate the 1911 then you are not really a gun guy.
__________________
I am a proud to be a member of the NRA, GOA, FPC and The 2nd Amendment Foundation
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 03-29-2020, 12:41 AM
DArBad DArBad is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: USA.
Age: 63
Posts: 5,699
Personally, I know I was hooked in the 1911s ever since I could remember. Hearing stories from my father and several uncles extolling its virtues in WWII picked my interest. That was around 1960.

Then came the TV series " Combat " starring Vic Morrow and Rick Jason and I knew then that I am a 1911 fan for life. Still, it took many years before I was able to buy own 1911.

It was around 1988/89 when I bought my first 1911, a Springfield Standard its called. From then on, I was not without a 1911.

My son prefers the 1911 over any type of handgun.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 03-29-2020, 01:21 AM
Striker2237 Striker2237 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Central Ohio
Posts: 6,994
I'm 24 and not a single person of my age group who I've had shoot my carry Wilson has ever looked at their plastic guns the same way. Real 1911s are so far above and beyond that all that is needed is to allow a mag to be fired for people to get it.

Quickest way to covert a hardcore Glock or HK guy is to have them use a 9mm 1911 on the timer vs their guns. They sometimes just stare at the "obsolete" gun in their hands in disbelief it just outdid their plastic modern wonder gun.
__________________
Carry gun:Wilson Carry Comp Custom .45S Pocket carry:on loan Other 1911s:WC Supergrade Accucomp .38, WC BW Opticomp, WC CQB Compact, WC CQB Professional, WC Super Sentinel, WC CQB Elite 9mm, WC EDC X9, WC X9S, Ed Brown SR, NHC Predator II Opticomp, NHC T3 Hardchrome, Kimber Ultra, ATI Tactical, RIA Tactical 10mm, Kimber Ultra Diamond 9mm, Detonics Combat Master MKVI, Colt Centennial .460 Roland
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 03-29-2020, 02:33 AM
peacebutready peacebutready is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Southwest U.S.
Posts: 1,245
Quote:
Originally Posted by dsk View Post
...Today interest in the 1911 is on a steady decline, due in no small part to the fact that everybody wants a modern high-cap pistol or lightweight carry gun instead. If we end up with another magazine limit however I suspect either the .45 1911 will again increase in popularity and/or small 10-shot 9mms like the SIG P365 and Glock 48 will reign supreme.
I didn't know interest in the 1911 was on a decline. When did this start? I thought it was strong as ever.


Quote:
Originally Posted by JLS1911 View Post
I think it might have something to do with feel, ease of fire and looks. To me, a "plastic" gun really doesn't feel like like a gun. Don't get me wrong there are tons of polymer guns that are great tools but I haven't had one in my hands yet that actually felt like a gun. Triggers on a 1911 are just so easy and crisp it makes them much easier to shoot and stay on target. And let's face it, they really are way cooler looking than most any other pistols out there. Of course this is just my opinion but these are just three of the reasons that come to mind. I could go on and on but I won't bore everyone with my old man soap box theory. Be safe and well my friends.
I always felt polymer/plastic guns felt like a cross between a gun and a toy.

A part of me is surprised the double stack 1911s are not more popular than they are. Is it the weight all loaded up? If so, maybe the answer is an aluminum frame to cut down on weight.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Grey Hare View Post
PFffft no.

A 1911 is a machined bit of barstock. It's a precision instrument, like a spring-driven watch.

Ther's something that can't quite put in to words about how it feels to shoot an old-school gun.

And this one, this one has a trigger that makes rifles blush in envy. The 1911 is a pistolero's pistol. A marksan's pistol. I can't think of a sweeter trigger.

If this thing were a coffeemaker, it'd be a Piccola Europa. 3 foot lever, pressure gauge. You gotta keep the needle in the sweet spot as you pour your shot.

The 1911? You master the trigger press, she *will* hit where you aim. All the stories of jam-o-matics are just ham-fisted people that couldn't drive a stickshift even if you nailed the instruction manual to their forehad, buying fashionista hi-dollar guns. A proper 1911 rattles like a maracca.... but the barrel-to-slide interface? That's rock-solid. That and a good trigger is *all* that matters. The rest... is up to *you*.

The 1911 will always be a thing, because she was the first... and to my brain, *still* the best.

Why shoot twice? Because you can't aim. And you can't aim because you got too much ammo.

Train like a marksman, shoot like a marksman. One shot. One kill. No @[email protected]$ excuses.

This goes for rifle and pistol and bow and arrow and fists, too. Don't. Miss.

Make *every* round count.
Thanks. Your post hit the spot.

Which 1911s do you recommend that are inclined to rattle, have a solid barrel to slide interface, and are very reliable in your experience?
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 03-29-2020, 04:26 AM
Col. Colt Col. Colt is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Posts: 3,155
Well said, Old Grey Hare!

I also don't see any terrible slackening in interest (in general) - how many 1911 makers are there right now? But the 9MM double stack/plastic pistol craze is in part driven by simple marketing - kids watching all those movies need a starter gun that only costs $500 and "Tacticool" looks by make believe Heros who only shoot blanks make them think "look, the latest thing!" - and only the low end 1911s are within their budget, anyway. Later, as they mature and can afford it, they will, if given a chance, discover "The Real Thing" - with apologies to Coca Cola for having to use their very descriptive (and appropriate) phrase!

Gun stores are VERY happy to "Follow the FBI Fad" - it is keeping some of them in business by selling lots of folks a "whole new wardrobe" - gun, holster, ammo - to people that are already better dressed. And suddenly you are not a cool Dude unless you carry the latest 9MM plastic pistol. Even the old guys that know better (whether about cartridge effectiveness or the superior 1911 triggers, ease of carry, etc.) feel they have to "join in". "I don't want to be left behind!!". (And yes, if you are old and have "shot your wrists out" a lighter recoiling caliber may help that, anyway.)

And record numbers are parroting (in unison) the "All Calibers work the Same" lie that 40 plus years of ballistic and actual shootings show is a lot of hooey that the FBI cooked up to furnish guns so it's current recruits (no height or weight or, heaven forbid, sexual criteria) might - just might - be able to qualify with. The rest of the sheep city and state departments have the exact same problem with their available recruit/PC Pool - the must "qualify" people that have no business in a police uniform - and so they very cheerfully join the chorus. It doesn't hurt that plastic guns and minor league ammo is significantly cheaper to provide - an Administrator's dream, too. So now we all beat the drum for the puny 9MM - which has been well observed to be a mediocre performer for over a century now. My 10MM Colt only drops 3" at 100 yards - and still has more energy than a .45 at the muzzle. Think the 9 can do that?

Colt has, until recently at least, always had the correct idea about fit and avoided the "tight slide silliness" - after all, John Moses Browning finished the 1911's development (after real troop trials in the field) at Colt's old "Onion Dome" factory in Hartford, and they understood then what tolerances worked best in general/field use from real testing. (I would note that their are NO modern plastic pistols with "tight slides" - yet a lot of you reading this have no trouble with THEIR slide/frame fit! A little hypocritical, I think.

I think the 1911 will be around a little while longer - at least until we get lasers or mini rail guns. And what it once did, it can still do, regardless of other technologies - and what it does it does very well and that is proven. CC
__________________
Col. Colt

Certified Law Enforcement Trainer
Certified Glock, Colt and Remington LE Armorer

Last edited by Col. Colt; 03-29-2020 at 04:38 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 03-29-2020, 08:56 AM
GTTom GTTom is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: NH
Posts: 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Striker2237 View Post
I'm 24 and not a single person of my age group who I've had shoot my carry Wilson has ever looked at their plastic guns the same way. Real 1911s are so far above and beyond that all that is needed is to allow a mag to be fired for people to get it.

Quickest way to covert a hardcore Glock or HK guy is to have them use a 9mm 1911 on the timer vs their guns. They sometimes just stare at the "obsolete" gun in their hands in disbelief it just outdid their plastic modern wonder gun.
^^ This ^^
I took a defensive pistol skill class recently. We did a little timed competition. Drawing from the holster, 3 mags of 5 rounds at 40 feet, emergency reloads. I placed first with my WC EDC X9 against 5 other students. (all polymers). The winner got to shoot off against the instructor. He beat me by 2 shots in accuracy. BUT I beat his split times. He asked to try my WC. After a mag his eyes lit up and he smiled and said that is the only pistol he ever shot that he couldn't out run the trigger on follow-up shots.

He was using a SIG 320. He is ex military MP who was on their version of a SWAT team. He can shoot lights out accurate and the fastest draw at the shooting range. Now he always asks what kind of pistol I'm bringing to his next class
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 03-29-2020, 09:31 AM
bradsvette bradsvette is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: South
Posts: 2,808
Holy cow, we found out how old Striker is. The old boy is pretty gun savvy for being such a youngster.

I'm 65, so I loved 1911s before the 10 round ban. And I loved 1911s after the 10 round ban. And I've got one on my hip as I type this.

I have to admit that I've got a slew of plastic guns. And I compete with a G34 in Steel Challenge and USPSA, and a G17 in IDPA. But I carry 1911s. The plastic pistols have no soul.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 03-29-2020, 10:03 AM
gumbee gumbee is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Orange County,California
Posts: 2,930
BTW, happy 109th birthday to the 1911.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 03-29-2020, 10:43 AM
45 Bow 45 Bow is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Posts: 86
I have a fond appreciation of the 1911. I am one of the lucky ones, as my son who is a freshman in college and an ARMY ROTC Cadet, has the same appreciation as I/we here on 1911 Forum share.

He is in the process of saving up for his own first 1911. I love watching him vasalate on brands and models. It is funny to watch and I still get the same way, when considering another one for myself. Some traits are passed down it seems.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 03-29-2020, 10:46 AM
Old Grey Hare Old Grey Hare is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Location: Some still-quiet little town in So. Fla.
Posts: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by peacebutready View Post

Which 1911s do you recommend that are inclined to rattle, have a solid barrel to slide interface, and are very reliable in your experience?
Being an old purist curmudgeon, I'll say Colt.

Slackening my standards a bit, RIA, SA. I refuse to say their full names, because our Government saw fit to shut down the real Springfield Armory and Rock Island Armory, and the names were bought by people who have bits of their guns made overseas. Keeps the price down, but ask yourself... is the $200 price cut worth it? I refuse to even say their name. But, I understand they're popular due to price, and I"ve shot a friend's RIA plain-jane GI model, and it ran like a watch. SHot nice, too.

But here is the most important thing: When you get a new gun, I don't care who made it or what you paid for it -- any gun that's new *to you*, strip it. Clean it. And I mean *CLEAN* the snot out of it.

My Colt had shipping grease in the firing pin channel. It had grease everywhere. That red, sticky shipping grease. Even after giving it what I throught was a proper cleaning, the first range was an embarrassment. Lots of failure to feeds, and the hotter she got the worse it got, so I stopped, went home, and cleaned her all over again. I had missed some grease in the frame rails.

2nd range trip to today, she's shot 1600 rounds of ball and jhp mixed with absolutely no hangups. I trust my Series 70 with my life.

Ask yourself how much of the stories of jam-o-matics are the result of owners not cleaning properly a new gun. Or limp-wristing. Can't shoot these like a revolver. OR, in the quest for "ultimate" precision, they make the slide-to-frame fit extremely tight. Can't do that. She was designed to be sloppy there.

If you have one with bad barrel-to-slide lockup, she simply won't print worth a ****. It won't shoot straight. I've yet to meet one that bad.

Don't fret about it, don' fall for marketing.

Always remember, it isn't the arrow, it's the indian.
__________________
Beware any government intent on disarming its people
-----------------v--------------
[SOAP] [BALLOT] [JURY] [AMMO]
-----------------^--------------
Member NRA, GOA, SAF, VCDL, FL Carry
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 03-29-2020, 11:35 AM
dsk's Avatar
dsk dsk is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Posts: 70,105
Quote:
Originally Posted by peacebutready View Post
I didn't know interest in the 1911 was on a decline. When did this start? I thought it was strong as ever.
Maybe it's a regional thing? There are three well-stocked gun shops close to me. Ten years ago each one had a glass case dedicated to 1911-type pistols. Over the years their inventory shrank, to where now what few 1911s they still stock are grouped with the revolvers, while the glass cases are predominantly filled with plastic fantastics of every shape and size. And the 1911s are usually cheap ones from RIA, Auto Ordnance and Springfield. Amazingly I don't see Kimbers for sale anywhere, which is odd because ten years ago they were the most common brand out there. I've also noticed that most of the 1911s dealers stock are 9mm versions, not .45ACP. It used to be the only 1911s I couldn't easily find locally were Colts, but now if I want nearly anything else I have to special order it or buy it off Gunbroker.

By contrast there isn't a single shop in my area that doesn't have nearly every Glock model made, or SIG, or FN, S&W or Taurus. Those are the predominant firearms being sold where I live.
__________________
Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1970 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 03-29-2020, 12:05 PM
Kevin Rohrer's Avatar
Kevin Rohrer Kevin Rohrer is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Medina, Ohio USA
Posts: 2,127
Quote:
Originally Posted by TucsonRick View Post
I think also the collective work of people such as Jeff Cooper (and others), and the FBI selection of the 1911 (Springfield Pro) with all the publicity and status of that and similar selections (LAPD selections, etc, etc).
^^This^^

is what I was just about to write. Great minds think alike.

In addition to these two reasons,

*there are lots of former GIs who carried them and wanted one (which includes me)

*Lots of SWAT teams carried them, and word got out that 1911s are the guns for professional use

*The great trigger made them desirable for competition

*Lots of gunsmiths began making their own and/or customizing stock guns because of demand, which created a synergy effect
__________________
Member: Orange Gunsite Family, NRA-Life, and the American Legion.

Don't trust Cavery Grips/American Gripz. He WILL rip you off.
All my 1911s are in .45acp. Why? Because no one makes one in .46cal.--Me
The 9mm is a SD cartridge fit only for women and Europeans--Me
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 03-29-2020, 02:39 PM
Col. Colt Col. Colt is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Posts: 3,155
The 1911 was the first truly effective large bore semi auto pistol - and it's popularity started with WWI and it has always had a following - which really took off in the 1970's due to Jeff Cooper and IPSC shooting. Until recently, all the SWAT teams, most Special Operations units, etc., preferred the 1911. And it remains popular, although the general public's tastes (and Police Administrators needs) have certainly reduced it's appeal to those who don't know any better.

The real reason gun shops fill their cases with plastic pistols (having worked eight years at an American Pistolsmith Guild shop) is based VERY largely on economic realities of trying to maximize profit. How good or bad the gun is is irrelevant to whether it will sell and make money. And, for young people, the 1911 is expensive - they can afford a $550.00 Glock - but an even $800 1911 that shoots the same size bullets and holds less of them? They need to know the reason they should spend 50% more for the steel gun - and most will never hear it from a gun seller that wants an easier sale and to make more money selling higher volume, cheaper goods. Gun shops LOVE the 9MM Fad.

When bringing in a product or a line of products the first thing the gun shop owner has to look at is his Profit Margin on each dollar he invests in Inventory. If I can make more percentage wise on Kimber over Colt, guess what - I will promote Kimber, even if it jams due to overtight and the MIM parts break - as Kimbers actually did, originally. (Colt also had a poor distribution system to dealers - which did not help.) And, because of how cheap it is to mold plastic vs. milling steel, I will bet the profit margins (at all levels) have to be greater per dollar spent in inventory on plastic pistols. You cannot ignore that margin and stay in business against those who use it to their advantage.

I will bet that both bulk and premium 9MM, simply due to high volume production - is more profitable to stock and sell than the more expensive (and more effective) Super .38, 10MM and .45ACP ammo. Even the very few people who do understand ballistics seem to forget when buying that a short barreled 9MM is in effect a .38 Special, - seldom actually reaching much more than 1100 fps out of actual owners sub 4" barreled guns.

The second reason was already alluded to: The kids see the movie heros shooting blanks out of a new model Glock, SIG, etc., and go buy the same model their fake Hollywood Hero is carrying - Human Nature 101.

All my heros I grew up with were not "fake pretty boys" - instead they really killed Nazis, Chicoms and Imperial Japanese soldiers with great success with their M1911's. And then Jeff Cooper showed everyone how effective a 1911 can be and from the 1970's on it was the standard. Fast forward to today - The young folks have never seen a 1911 or a revolver in a cop's holster, and know nothing of history or ballistics - so they don't respect them. Now all they see cops carrying are Glocks - so it must be the best, Right?

Gun shops have to make a profit to keep the doors open and the owner comfortable - so they go with the flow - the Cash Flow. How good or bad the product is, it's actual effectiveness as a weapon, after the new owner pays them and walks out the door is NOT their concern. CC
__________________
Col. Colt

Certified Law Enforcement Trainer
Certified Glock, Colt and Remington LE Armorer

Last edited by Col. Colt; 03-30-2020 at 04:28 AM. Reason: spelling
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 03-29-2020, 03:40 PM
Starship Enterpris Starship Enterpris is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 1,288
Back in 1990 I was a Sergeant in the 60 Pct. of the NYPD. An older, vastly more experienced Sergeant transferred in. We worked the same shifts and developed a friendship. Turns out we were both "gun guys". My answer to the question was a Beretta 92. His was the iconic 1911.

We started shooting together and I quickly came around to the 1911 religion. So much so that we wound up going to the high desert cathedral of Gunsite. He was taking a different class, and I the 250. Listening to Jeff Cooper give the Wednesday morning lecture was awe inspiring. Receiving an E-ticket from him was a pinnacle in my firearms experience.

Thanks, Pat. I miss you every day.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 03-29-2020, 04:26 PM
jtq jtq is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: NW Florida
Age: 61
Posts: 11,292
Quote:
Originally Posted by dsk View Post
Ten years ago each one had a glass case dedicated to 1911-type pistols. Over the years their inventory shrank, to where now what few 1911s they still stock are grouped with the revolvers, while the glass cases are predominantly filled with plastic fantastics of every shape and size.
In 2008, President Obama was elected and all guns were popular, including 1911's.

Between 2010 - 2012 were the 100th Anniversary years of the 1911. They were very popular then, as were holsters for them. I recall folks being unable to get on the Sparks waiting list, and I think Tucker was running about year plus for carved holsters. It was a pretty crazy time.

I think the slow down began around 2015 as most folks had maxed out their need for a 1911 a couple of years earlier. Then, in 2016, when President Trump was elected, there wasn't the feeling we were going to lose our gun rights and the perceived need to get a gun right now, waned.

A few years ago, SIG came out with their Legion Series, next Wilson came out with their Beretta Brigadier Tactical, and that was followed by Langdon Beretta's that gave folks a higher end metal framed option without going into the $2,000 + 1911 range.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 03-29-2020, 04:50 PM
dsk's Avatar
dsk dsk is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Posts: 70,105
If we look further back into history, the 1911's popularity didn't really start taking off until the late 1960s. Throughout the early and mid 20th Century Colt's production and sales of Government Models and Super .38s was very low, in fact it was just a trickle compared to all the revolvers, .22s and pocket automatics they sold during the same time period. The government was pretty much the only large buyer throughout much of its history. But by the time of the Series 70 models Colt was finally selling every one they could make. The rise of combat-style competition shooting was a major factor, along with pubic interest in semi-automatic pistols which at long last were starting to catching up to revolvers in terms of sales. That and the fact that a lot of Vietnam vets wanted to buy a copy of the service sidearm they carried, and the 1911 at last began to take center stage.

The popularity of double-action, double-stack 9mms put a serious dent in 1911 sales beginning in the mid 1980s, especially after the Beretta was adopted as the new service pistol. But the 1911's dominance in competitive shooting, along with the interest in fancy custom 1911s assured its continued popularity. I agree with jtq that the slowdown is fairly recent, with the end of the AWB and mag capacity limits at the federal level being the main catalyst.
__________________
Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1970 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:04 AM.


NOTICE TO USERS OF THIS SITE: By continuing to use this site, you certify that you have read and agree to abide by the Legal Terms of Use. All information, data, text or other materials ("Content") posted to this site by any users are the sole responsibility of those users. 1911Forum does not guarantee the accuracy, integrity, or quality of such Content.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 2015 1911Forum.com, LLC. All Rights Reserved