Breaking-In EDC Holster - 1911Forum
1911Forum
Advertise Here
Forum   Reviews   Rules   Legal   Site Supporters & Donations   Advertise


Go Back   1911Forum > >

Notices


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 12-28-2018, 07:20 AM
DrPartagas DrPartagas is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Bethlehem, PA
Posts: 159
Breaking-In EDC Holster

What tips do you have for breaking in a new EDC holster? I have my EDC X9 holster from Palmetto. The gun sits very tight as it is a new holster. But, the draw its tight.

I need a few ideas to break it in for an easier draw.

Thanks
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 12-28-2018, 07:45 AM
DouglasS's Avatar
DouglasS DouglasS is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Orange County California
Posts: 694
From The Milt Sparks website:
https://www.miltsparks.com/questions.php

"Tightness in a new holster is not uncommon and is much preferable to the alternative. If the draw is a little stiff at first, it is recommended that you work with it to see if it doesn't loosen up with a bit of use. About 25 to 50 presentations should be a good indicator of whether the holster will break in sufficiently on its own or if maybe a little blocking out of the leather is in order. There are many variables as to why a holster would be excessively tight ranging from the texture of your guns finish, to slight changes in climate or humidity from where the holster is made. Regardless of the reason, a too tight holster can easily be remedied by the end user with a method we have been recommending to customers for over 30 years.

To block out (stretch) your new holster first UNLOAD your pistol or revolver and place the gun into the 4 mil plastic bag that your new holster was packaged in. Then carefully insert the bagged gun all the way into the holster (do not! I repeat, do not!! wet or spray the holster with any solution to aid in the stretching process). The blocking out process as described above will in no way harm the crisp detailed molding of your new holster, nor will it ruin its retention qualities. It serves simply to stretch the leather a few thousands of an inch larger than the gun. The amount of stretching time needed for satisfactory results range from a just a few minutes to overnight."
__________________
There are 10 types of people,
those who understand binary...and those who don't.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 12-28-2018, 07:45 AM
Stealth01 Stealth01 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: MidWest
Posts: 425
Wrap the gun in a plastic bag and insert it in the holster for 24 to 48 hours. Then, still wrapped in plastic, draw and holster the weapon 20 to 30 times. The holster should begin to adapt to your gun. DO NOT use any lotions or lubricants on the leather!!
__________________
Ken
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #4  
Old 12-28-2018, 07:47 AM
Signman150 Signman150 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 351
Wrap your X9 in the bag the holster came in and insert the gun in the holster. Let it sit overnight and you should be fine. I believe the term is blocking out your holster.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 12-28-2018, 08:34 AM
apipeguy's Avatar
apipeguy apipeguy is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Michigan
Age: 64
Posts: 5,083
Just got a new VMII for of all things a P238. It was extremely tight and I had to work it quite a bit just to be able to draw it. I did not block it with a plastic bag (might have been easier) just worked it a bunch. It is still just a touch tight but very, very nice.

Sometimes new quality leather holsters take a little work. They are far better than a loose new leather holster.
__________________
David

NRA Benefactor Life Member
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 12-28-2018, 10:05 AM
Ricky T's Avatar
Ricky T Ricky T is offline
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Atlanta, GA, USA
Age: 57
Posts: 13,194
Breaking in a holster is the same whether one has a Wilson or a Glock. So I'm moving this to the holster section for more exposure. But the few replies above should be adequate.
__________________
Liking a Glock is a Version of Stockholm Syndrome. Nobody likes it but they get used to it in time.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 12-29-2018, 11:43 PM
L84CABO L84CABO is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Orcas Island, WA & San Diego
Posts: 3,650
First and foremost, do some presentations. Like 500 or so. Then see where it's at. If it's still tight, grab a plastic bag like Sparks suggests. You could also try a holster lubricant like Mitch Rosen Leather Lightning or KG-9. Be VERY careful with treating the leather with anything that will actually soften the leather. You absolutely do not want that. The two products that I've listed are fine for leather.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 12-30-2018, 02:55 AM
PBag PBag is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 260
You could try wrapping the weapon in a layer of wax paper and leaving it in the holster for several hours,
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 12-30-2018, 09:17 AM
flphotog flphotog is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 732
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stealth01 View Post
Wrap the gun in a plastic bag and insert it in the holster for 24 to 48 hours. Then, still wrapped in plastic, draw and holster the weapon 20 to 30 times. The holster should begin to adapt to your gun. DO NOT use any lotions or lubricants on the leather!!
I prefer to use wax paper. For me I wrap the gun in wax paper, insert in the holster and leave it there for a couple hours, that is usually enough. Non and then it takes a couple of times.
__________________
Member COTEP CBOB0772, NRA, GOA
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 12-30-2018, 06:11 PM
JamieC JamieC is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Florida
Posts: 899
Using a plastic bag along with actually wearing the holster for a bit works for me. I have used wax paper for a couple of draws, the wax transfers to the REALLY tight spots, 'speeds' up the break in process.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 12-30-2018, 06:41 PM
apipeguy's Avatar
apipeguy apipeguy is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Michigan
Age: 64
Posts: 5,083
I have used some of the new kind of kitchen cling wrap. Molds very nicely to the gun and can be wrapped as lightly or heavily as you want.
__________________
David

NRA Benefactor Life Member
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 12-30-2018, 07:03 PM
frogfurr frogfurr is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Preble County, Ohio
Posts: 2,500
There may be better options than wax paper but wax paper certainly does help.

In my experience the best way is just to wear the holster as much as I possibly can. That seems to work out with ease of draw and still maintain the good retention of the holster.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 12-30-2018, 11:39 PM
LoboGunLeather LoboGunLeather is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Colorado
Posts: 729
Some understanding of the nature of leather holsters and manufacturing processes may help in understanding this subject.

Leather is a fibrous material consisting of animal hide that has been processed to preserve it as a usable material. Leather fibers are naturally flexible and (with proper tanning techniques) can be molded into shapes that can be retained over long use. A well-fitted holster is made from vegetable-tanned leather that is closely formed to the intended handgun by the wet-molding process, during which the leather is intentionally stretched and molded to final shape. While damp the leather can be stretched, but as it dries it tends to contract somewhat.

A newly made holster that is very closely fitted to the handgun will almost certainly require a break-in period. During the early stages of use the leather can be expected to stretch under force as the handgun is inserted and withdrawn. During long-term use the leather can be expected to react to the forces applied, and some stretching will become permanent. If the holster was initially fitted so that no break-in use was required the stretching common to use will result in a loose fit over a relatively brief time. If the holster was initially fitted very closely the break-in use will result in a fit that remains as close as possible over long-term use.

The best method of break-in is simply wearing the new holster with the handgun inserted for several hours at a time over the course of several days. This allows the leather holster to accommodate itself to the handgun, the user's belt, and the user's body profile. Repeatedly inserting and drawing the handgun can be expected to produce the desired effects over the break-in period.

What some others have described as "blocking" the holster by placing the (unloaded) handgun in a plastic bag, then forcing it into the holster, can be useful for accelerating the usual break-in period. This method should not be overdone, as the "blocking" induces stretching of the leather fibers that cannot be undone once it has occurred. A single thickness of 2-4 mil plastic bag material is fine, while multiple thicknesses may cause excessive stretching.

Another helpful method that I can recommend, but only AFTER the initial break-in period, is wrapping the handgun in kitchen plastic wrap (very thin), then applying wax (Johnsons Paste Wax or neutral shoe polish) to the plastic wrap, then inserting and withdrawing repeatedly in the holster. The wax will be transferred to the leather fibers at friction points, remaining there to serve as a lubricant during the draw. PLEASE NOTE: This is another technique that can be overdone, and cannot be undone afterward. What you are doing is exchanging retention (security) for accessibility (ease of draw), so a little bit may be good but too much could be bad.

Overall, the best technique is simply wearing the holstered handgun for extended periods over several days, allowing your body heat and belt tensioning to allow the holster to achieve its final (and best) fit naturally. Forcing things can have negative consequences.
__________________
Retired.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 01-10-2019, 07:38 PM
Lsingh Lsingh is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 109
I have used wax papers wrap em around leave em on over night till ur desired retention .. i also many times with a new tight holster I wear em around while in the house wrapped up with the wax paper !!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:17 PM.


NOTICE TO USERS OF THIS SITE: By continuing to use this site, you certify that you have read and agree to abide by the Legal Terms of Use. All information, data, text or other materials ("Content") posted to this site by any users are the sole responsibility of those users. 1911Forum does not guarantee the accuracy, integrity, or quality of such Content.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 2015 1911Forum.com, LLC. All Rights Reserved