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  #1  
Old 04-07-2018, 08:13 PM
WaterDR WaterDR is offline
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NRA Instructor Certification and Rates for Instruction

Hey guys, I am looking to get certified this month.

For 1:1 training what have you guys seen as a typical rate a new instructor could charge?
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  #2  
Old 04-07-2018, 09:51 PM
jjfitch jjfitch is online now
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The answer will vary depending on demographics, a Google search in you area will reveal what NRA instructors charge. (For NRA Basic Pistol in your area)

I can tell you what I charge but it is irrelevant since I don't use NRA material or hand out NRA certificates.

I use course material I've developed over 25 years to prepare students for CCW. My students shoot 250 rounds over 5, 2 hour lessons and can pass any CCW class shooting requirement!

Shoot often, shoot safe.....
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  #3  
Old 04-08-2018, 09:11 AM
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Grandpas50AE Grandpas50AE is offline
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As jjfitch said above, a lot will depend on the demographics of your area. Figure the cost of the materials and range fees, plus cost of office space rental (if any), and training aids cost over time. Add what your time is worth, and you have a base to go with. My own approach is that I make a small profit (not enough to make a living on) since I have a regular job to pay bills, and look to do this more when I retire from my regular job as a source of secondary income. It may depend some on whether you want to do this as a primary income or secondary income, but either way it will still depend on the demographics in your area.
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  #4  
Old 04-08-2018, 09:43 AM
Cappi Cappi is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WaterDR View Post
Hey guys, I am looking to get certified this month.
which cert?
there's like a kabillion of 'em.....

Quote:
For 1:1 training what have you guys seen as a typical rate a new instructor could charge?
how much are you worth?
and how good of an instructor are you?

It's no different than any other service biz part time or full
Be it a painter or wallpaper hanger, driving or shooting instructor ..all aren't created equal and all don't provide same level of service or accommodation

I personally have a minimum charge for one on one.
That gives up to 3 hours including range time if applicable

$35 per hour after

..L.T.A.
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  #5  
Old 04-08-2018, 04:04 PM
wccountryboy wccountryboy is online now
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Originally Posted by Cappi View Post
which cert?
there's like a kabillion of 'em.....



how much are you worth?
and how good of an instructor are you?

It's no different than any other service biz part time or full
Be it a painter or wallpaper hanger, driving or shooting instructor ..all aren't created equal and all don't provide same level of service or accommodation

..L.T.A.
Lots of good points here, as well as in all the other replies...

What is your local market like?
How capable or experianced is the "competition"?
How good of an instructor are YOU? This bears serious, ego free, unbiased consideration. The NRA doesn't teach you how to teach, at least to any level of competence. You will either need to have this skill already, have an innate, natural ability, or be willing to learn as you go- and charge students accordingly.
If you lack teaching experience or education, can you play 2nd chair for an established, reputable instructor...?

Personally, I think that if your only "credential" is an NRA instructor card thay you got a week ago Tuesday, your time in a one on one environment has very little value. As with any profession, you have to gain both skill and experience (both of which take TIME) to develop competency as an instructor. My perspective is that of a professional instructor and training developer at the world's premier special warfare facility. When I first got this assignment, I had 25 years of experiance in my field. Before I ever took the platform, I went though 100 hours of instruction in the Special Operations Instructors Course- add in daily homework, product development, preperation and studying, probalbly closer to 150 hours... AFTER that, I spend countless hours learning POIs, and presenting them to my more experienced peers... THEN i was allowed to serve as an AI... THEN, under supervision, I was allowed to PI...

While I recognize that that degree of focused education and training, just to teach (never mind mastery of the subject matter), isn't readily available to most, I think the novice instructor needs to recognize that his "professional" time has limited value without a resume to back it up... he owes ot to himself and his students to develop himself as an instructor before hanging up a shingle...
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  #6  
Old 04-08-2018, 07:32 PM
WaterDR WaterDR is offline
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Looks like a new instructor around here get about $40/hr plus ammo and space rental.

I have a member ship at a range and thinking I can charge $50/hr including range fees or $65/hr including a gun rental.

I think I am veey good with new shooters and want to focus on handgun operations not necessarily self defensive or teaching carry classes. I get a lot of great compliments from people who I have helped. I think I am good at explaining things and putting things in a way that relate to people.

Light bulb went off a few days ago when a scared to death friend of mine wanted some help. He’s been putting it off for months. Buy the end of the hour he was honestly shooting better than about anyone else at the range (which may not be saying much 🙂 ). Good, solid form and technique. Now he wants me to work with his wife and three daughters and stuffed $60 in my bag which I tried to give back.

I want to teach new shooters. Help them chose a firearm, and teach proper safety, form etc.... Maybe put together a three course curriculum that includes drills and video.

I guess I can start there. If I can’t find any students then I am pointing in the wrong direction.
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  #7  
Old 04-08-2018, 08:11 PM
wccountryboy wccountryboy is online now
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Originally Posted by WaterDR View Post
I think I am veey good with new shooters and want to focus on handgun operations not necessarily self defensive or teaching carry classes. I get a lot of great compliments from people who I have helped. I think I am good at explaining things and putting things in a way that relate to people.

What YOU think matters not, nor does the opinion of beginners who've no idea what right looks like... find a reputable, known, experianced trainer... present a block of instruction... see what he has to say about it. Now you have a baseline to work with.

Light bulb went off a few days ago when a scared to death friend of mine wanted some help. Heís been putting it off for months. Buy the end of the hour he was honestly shooting better than about anyone else at the range (which may not be saying much 🙂 ). Good, solid form and technique. Now he wants me to work with his wife and three daughters and stuffed $60 in my bag which I tried to give back.

By all means, help your friend and his family- but do it out of friendship, not for profit. If he wants to (and should) cover costs, ammo and range time, great.

I want to teach new shooters. Help them chose a firearm, and teach proper safety, form etc.... Maybe put together a three course curriculum that includes drills and video.

Such an endeavor shouldn't be about what YOU want, but about what your honest, no BS , real abilities and talent support.... don't even consider "putting together" a curriculum, let alone a 3 segment acending POI without real, quantifiable, training and experience... youtube is full of videos by "experts"; 99% are morons who've klno idea of what they're doing.

I guess I can start there. If I canít find any students then I am pointing in the wrong direction.

You'll find "students"; there's no shortage... what they get for theirntime and $ is another matter...
First, to be clear, I'm NOT trying to be a condescending ass... but I take training seriously, and I've little respect for those trying to turn their hobby into beer money, with no real qualifications, education, or experiance... sadly, the current market is flush with cottage industry, fly by night, hobbyists who get an ego trip out of wearing an "instructor" hat- and essentially rob their students. The novice student has no idea if they're getting their hard earned dollar's worth; its easy to convince the ignorant that they're "trained"....

I've trained thousands over the years. If my signature is on a training record, document, certification, or 1059, its solid gold. The student met or exceeded the requerments for the specific course or event, at that time, guaranteed. I would vouch for what ANY student was taught, and how, under oath, in court, any day.

I'd give serious consideration to not only your motivations, but abilities as well. Get an outside, experianced, reputable opinion on your capabilities... what you "thinkl" is irrelevant, as is the opinion of a novice... then decide how to proceed.
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  #8  
Old 04-08-2018, 09:23 PM
Cappi Cappi is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WaterDR View Post
Looks like a new instructor around here get about $40/hr plus ammo and space rental.

I have a member ship at a range and thinking I can charge $50/hr including range fees or $65/hr including a gun rental.

I think I am veey good with new shooters and want to focus on handgun operations not necessarily self defensive or teaching carry classes. I get a lot of great compliments from people who I have helped. I think I am good at explaining things and putting things in a way that relate to people.

Light bulb went off a few days ago when a scared to death friend of mine wanted some help. Heís been putting it off for months. Buy the end of the hour he was honestly shooting better than about anyone else at the range (which may not be saying much 🙂 ). Good, solid form and technique. Now he wants me to work with his wife and three daughters and stuffed $60 in my bag which I tried to give back.

I want to teach new shooters. Help them chose a firearm, and teach proper safety, form etc.... Maybe put together a three course curriculum that includes drills and video.

I guess I can start there. If I canít find any students then I am pointing in the wrong direction.
you really don't need any certs for that.

You just need to know what the hell you're talking about/teaching
and the ability to clearly communicate it in a way the lowest common denominator student can understand.

Having been in instructor/trainer positions in many different fields over my working life, what I found helped me most (besides good observation skills, solid working knowledge/experience and common sense) were the classes and training/instruction I've taken/had over the years

Take enough technical classes, be they for lead certs or fly tying..
You get to learn what makes a good instructor from a mediocre one to the most monotone drone blathering on and on with little meat to their soup sandwich presentation

you learn as much from the BAD ones of what NOT to do as you do from the good ones


..L.T.A.
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  #9  
Old 04-08-2018, 09:45 PM
wccountryboy wccountryboy is online now
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Originally Posted by Cappi View Post
You just need to know what the hell you're talking about/teaching
and the ability to clearly communicate it in a way the lowest common denominator student can understand.

True... but thats not worth $50/hr... the rates for Gunsight or a nationally known, high end, reputable instructor are less...

Having been in instructor/trainer positions in many different fields over my working life, what I found helped me most (besides good observation skills, solid working knowledge/experience and common sense) were the classes and training/instruction I've taken/had over the years

A very valid point. You learn not only subject matter, but some technique, from being a student.

Take enough technical classes, be they for lead certs or fly tying..
You get to learn what makes a good instructor from a mediocre one to the most monotone drone blathering on and on with little meat to their soup sandwich presentation

you learn as much from the BAD ones of what NOT to do as you do from the good ones

Also true... sort of. To learn from BAD instructors, you have to be able to recognize that the instruction is poor, and, most importantly, WHY it was poor- and how to correct it. This goes beyond just learning preferences and style, and requires an honest, objective look at the presentation of material, and its effectiveness...
..L.T.A.
Lots of good points; some observations...
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Old 04-08-2018, 10:35 PM
M Yaworski M Yaworski is offline
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Depends on the hotness level of the student. Thirty-five or younger, single, and shapely I don't charge a penny. Over thirty-five and milfish, they have to pay for ammo, range time and lunch.

Seriously, I haven't charged anyone in decades.
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  #11  
Old 04-09-2018, 07:52 AM
Cappi Cappi is offline
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Originally Posted by wccountryboy View Post
Lots of good points; some observations...
and the ability to clearly communicate it in a way the lowest common denominator student can understand.

True... but thats not worth $50/hr... the rates for Gunsight or a nationally known, high end, reputable instructor are less


sorta-kinda, Pard

Time, logistics and associated cost becomes a factor for the average Everyman
Convenience becomes a factor many will pay a premium for.
Whether or not the "value" is there, we can't rightly judge with no knowledge of presentation

and honestly, we don't know whether or not WD's instruction and facility is worth fiddy an hour to some folks or not.
I sure can't anyway

we can generalize only


Quote:
To learn from BAD instructors, you have to be able to recognize that the instruction is poor, and, most importantly, WHY it was poor- and how to correct it.


This goes beyond just learning preferences and style, and requires an honest, objective look at the presentation of material, and its effectiveness
Yep and Yep


Here's my thoughts on that, and hope it doesn't come off arrogant or condescending to anyone .....

from my observations over the years, regardless of the field or endeavor .
Some folks "get it", most don't and never will

specific to your above points

anyone that doesn't start with those attributes intuitively, will never be a "best" instructor .
They can be an adequate one, even more than adequate with a scripted professional program coupled with good communication skills

but they'll never be a "better/best" one if they can't intuitively recognize/do the things you mentioned.
Because they'll always need spoon fed to improve by those that "get it"






Lastly, can one get one on one private instruction/training/coaching from a top tier bona fide instructor for $50 an hour?

can I pay them in room 'n board and guided steelhead fishing trips to some of best Steelhead waters south of Alaska?


..L.T.A.
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  #12  
Old 04-09-2018, 08:12 AM
Cappi Cappi is offline
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WaterDoc


what certs are you getting?
Basic Pistol?

and I'm sure you're smart enough to know to get insurance too, right....




Quote:
Seriously, I haven't charged anyone in decades.
I give a lot of free ones away
even to the fugly ones

young single moms working in low wage jobs get priority.
and if they're kids are old enough to comprehend, they're encouraged to come to class too

coffee/pop/water, student materials and range time included ...no charge


even ugly girls need love.......


..L.T.A.
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Old 04-09-2018, 09:18 AM
wccountryboy wccountryboy is online now
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Originally Posted by Cappi View Post
Time, logistics and associated cost becomes a factor for the average Everyman
Convenience becomes a factor many will pay a premium for.
Whether or not the "value" is there, we can't rightly judge with no knowledge of presentation
and honestly, we don't know whether or not WD's instruction and facility is worth fiddy an hour to some folks or not.
I sure can't anyway

I'd suggest that nobody with the ink still wet on their NRA cert is worth $50/hr- regardless of the student's perception of quality and value. Just because the student doesn't know enough to know that they're getting hosed doesn't make it a good value- or ethicsl.

Lastly, can one get one on one private instruction/training/coaching from a top tier bona fide instructor for $50 an hour?

No, most actual professional instructors use a small group training model, not 1:1; the latter isn't worth their time or as efficient, nor the aquisition and use of first rate facilities and materials. What they offer is instructors that actually know how to teach, have been doing it for years, have a lifetime of professional experiance behind them, a proven POI... I'll bet the farm that one will learn a TON more in a day with a bonified professional in a small group setting than in a week of 1:1 with a raw amateur or hack trying to make his hobby profitable...

..L.T.A.
Quote:
I give a lot of free ones away*
even to the fugly ones*

young single moms working in low wage jobs get priority.
and if they're kids are old enough to comprehend, they're encouraged to come to class too
Quote:
Seriously, I haven't charged anyone in decades.
I haven't charged an individual for instruction... ever. I have provided additional, off the clout instruction to my professional students who are either struggling or want additional or more advanced guidance. They foot the bill for ammunition, and a range if applicable- oftentimes I can find a location at no cost.

I also get people referred to me semi regularly (mostly through my church) for basic, introdutory instruction, assesiing their needs, and offering solutions that best fit their circumstances... material and facilities costs are sorted out on an individual basis- sometimes it COSTS me $ to teach for a day...
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Old 04-09-2018, 09:48 AM
chances R chances R is offline
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Seriously, what other pertinent experience or qualifications do you have? The Basic NRA handgun instructor is just that, basic. Over-nite wonders with a basic Instructor certification are a dime a dozen. Not that it isn't important, but certainly not a stand alone qualification. If that is all you have, do the shooting instruction world a favor and get yourself some real training, if indeed you want to instruct. Train with as many 'known' instructors as you can. Get 'RangeMaster' certified, then you have a start on your credentials.
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  #15  
Old 04-09-2018, 12:50 PM
WaterDR WaterDR is offline
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I started off asking about rates and got a lot of diatribes and assumptions 🙂

Anyway, military background, IDPA shooter ans Bullseye pistol shooter. Am I Jerry Miculek? Nope. Had classes in pistol operations, advanced and tactical.

Some people are great trainers. Some people are great doers....some people can’t do either. My brother played for Lou Holts. Holts can’t throw a football.

I am going to check with my personal instructor and get her opinion and talk about next steps.....and yes....she’s a she.

She ans others know me ans my abilities ans I think can provide direction.
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Old 04-09-2018, 01:16 PM
wccountryboy wccountryboy is online now
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Originally Posted by WaterDR View Post
I started off asking about rates and got a lot of diatribes and assumptions 🙂

Nobody's ranting or making assumtions... we're dissecting your question, trying to get more information so that we can offer more informed opinions...

Anyway, military background, IDPA shooter ans Bullseye pistol shooter. Am I Jerry Miculek? Nope. Had classes in pistol operations, advanced and tactical.

This may or may not be of benifit... One can presume you have recently competent gun handling abilities... yet it doesn't address teaching abilities...
Since asking questions about your expeirances and abilities is apparently offensive to you, "diatribes and assumptions ", I'll go bact to your OP:

Quote:
Hey guys, I am looking to get certified this month.

For 1:1 training what have you guys seen as a typical rate a new instructor could charge?
A new instructor- with no other information on his abilities, with an NRA basic cert, working under his own shingle, is worth about $8 an hour...

Any more than that, and the student should be entitled to an instructor with some experiance and skill...
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Old 04-09-2018, 04:34 PM
WaterDR WaterDR is offline
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You must be a thrill at a party.

Hey, I have another question.....what would be the typical rate a a new auto mechanic?

“Well let’s see, if the mechanic didn’t have any experience as an actual mechanic, had never really driven a car much at all, didn’t know how to use a tool, I am thinking about $5/hr.”

This really should not be a tough question.

As I stated earlier, I’ll ask my instructor what she thinks.

But hey guys, thanks for the advice and the laughs.
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Old 04-10-2018, 11:44 AM
M Yaworski M Yaworski is offline
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Being a newly minted "NRA Instructor" does not imply that the person is a bad instructor or an unqualified instructor. Being a Marine or Ranger or cop or a police/military shooting instructor does not mean that you'll be good at teaching civilians.

To toot my own horn, I've always been considered a good teacher. Just something about the way that I communicate. I've been the go-to trainer at more jobs than I care to think about. I taught college. Boy Scout leader training staff. I enjoy teaching which would probably be ruined by doing it for a living.

I'd been teaching people to shoot for years when I decided to get my NRA ticket. Why? I wasn't charging people. It was just friends and people who asked, "Can you teach xxxx about guns?" Two reasons: firstly I wanted to be sure that I wasn't omitting anything that was important and, secondly, having a credential gives people a warm and fuzzy feeling about you. "This is my buddy Yaworski, he's gonna teach you about guns, n'at." vs "This is Yaworski, an NRA certified instructor, he can teach you about gun safety and how to shoot." Which sounds better to the prospective student?

Having an NRA credential allowed me to help out at the shooting range at Boy Scout summer camp.

The few people whom I've charged for my time, I've charged $20 an hour. That fee hasn't changed since 1993.

Do I teach CCW? Nope. Do I teach gunfighting? Nope. Do I teach IDPA or IPSC stuff? Nope. I teach the basics. As Harry Callahan said, "A man's got to know his limitations."

If you haven't done a lot of teaching in your life, I'd recommend that you get hooked up with a club that runs some classes and offer to help. That way you can get some experience teaching but not be in a situation where you're the only guy.
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Old 04-14-2018, 10:36 PM
mangeek mangeek is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wccountryboy View Post
Since asking questions about your expeirances and abilities is apparently offensive to you, "diatribes and assumptions ", I'll go bact to your OP:
Good move!

Quote:
Originally Posted by wccountryboy View Post
A new instructor- with no other information on his abilities, with an NRA basic cert, working under his own shingle, is worth about $8 an hour...

Any more than that, and the student should be entitled to an instructor with some experiance and skill...


Quote:
Originally Posted by WaterDR View Post
You must be a thrill at a party.
That had me spitting out my tea. Sorry, but it was very funny. Thanks for the laugh WaterDR. All the respect in the world for wccontryboy though for service and knowledge and experience. And I agree with wccontryboy's last approach to this discussion.




Quote:
Originally Posted by WaterDR View Post
Hey, I have another question.....what would be the typical rate a a new auto mechanic?

ďWell letís see, if the mechanic didnít have any experience as an actual mechanic, had never really driven a car much at all, didnít know how to use a tool, I am thinking about $5/hr.Ē
I think you missed wccountryboy's point about why he was forced to go back to your original question and answer it in a vanilla form.

This is out of my experience level, so can't add anymore to the discussion, but wanted to say thanks for the laugh and make the one point. Best of luck with your cert WaterDR.
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Old 04-14-2018, 11:21 PM
1911_Kid 1911_Kid is offline
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To teach NRA basic pistol one only needs to understand the NRA materials and be able to communicate that to students. Students will have questions that fall outside the courseware, so hopefully you can answer, but save that for break time or after class, etc. And of course, one must know semi single & dbl action, dbl-action revolver, single-action revolver.

There's also dbl-action-only pistols, but that's not covered in NRA basic.

Fees are based on market prices mixed with instructor. I have been in classes where teacher is ex-military (so you might get a lot of military style explaining of things were many times that is just not applicable in civilian world), and where teacher is just a long time gun person (but doesnt have the hands-on with special military weapons, which doesnt really matter).

I myself know a lot about guns, but that is the truth, a lot is not everything, and I never claim to know everything.

Can you right this very second explain the diff between series-70 and series-80 1911 to the person next to you? Or can you explain what the Springfield ILS is and can it be removed?

Why skip the 2nd chamber when loading an 'old' single action cowboy that has no safety?

So many things to know, too much for my gray matter to memorize it all.
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  #21  
Old 05-10-2018, 08:43 AM
jeffbird jeffbird is offline
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fwiw - the NRA Instructor Course was not particularly helpful or meaningful to me. Tom Givens' Instructor Course was much more challenging and receiving his certification felt like an accomplishment. I walked away a better shooter and unquestionably a better teacher. Please consider taking some instructor course beyond the NRA course.
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Old 05-10-2018, 08:58 AM
1911_Kid 1911_Kid is offline
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Originally Posted by jeffbird View Post
fwiw - the NRA Instructor Course was not particularly helpful or meaningful to me. Tom Givens' Instructor Course was much more challenging and receiving his certification felt like an accomplishment. I walked away a better shooter and unquestionably a better teacher. Please consider taking some instructor course beyond the NRA course.
For what NRA courseware are you referring to?

The NRA instructor course is for NRA materials. If you are comparing the two instructor courses for say a plumber who has rarely fired his 1022 or 38special, then perhaps the diff is noticeable?

For folks who know firearms to start with, the NRA instructor cert is a formality to be able to teach the NRA materials.
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Old 05-10-2018, 09:20 AM
7.62Kolectr 7.62Kolectr is offline
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I've been shooting most of my life. I have a deep knowledge set of the workings of just about all firearm platforms. I was an 'RSO' at several indoor ranges many years ago as well as rangemaster and retail sales when the line was cold. They were all around stores. But I was never officially certified as it just wasn't a requirement back then.
I have no police or military experience. But I am great with people, have a magnetic personality and can explain things in ways most can understand.
I too have been thinking about making things official, getting some certs and seeing where it takes me.
I have taken many classes myself on Threat Focused shooting and working on the basic skills people need to actually draw and shoot their guns.
My best friend gives the CCW classes here locally at shows and other places. He does about 20-40 people a week. These people show up, listen, get the required material needed to get their ability to carry and then holster up and think they are good to go. I can tell you from having worked on tne range that the majority of them still basically have no clue and are unsafe in many ways.
He and I have been talking about trying to help take them a step further and showing simple things like different, proper and safe modes of carry, drawing safely, point shooting, sighted shooting, weak handed shooting and very simple shooting with movement like draw and shift left to shoot or draw and shift right. Basically getting off the X and still putting rounds on targets from various distances. This would be a 1 or 2 day course.

I'm confident I could help many learn a lot. Am I a top tier former Seal team trainer? No.
But as many here are I do have as well a natural ability to shoot and teach.

I think a fair price for some fair training other than 'here's your carry permit, enjoy yourself' is in order for MANY. I'd start small and see where it takes me. Simple safe muzzle discipline and actual gun handling would be the main core.

It could turn into something that pays the bills and give me more satisfaction than my current job does.
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Old 05-10-2018, 09:28 AM
1911_Kid 1911_Kid is offline
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Location: AZ
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@7.62

CCW is not a NRA course. CCW is usually State course materials.

Most of what you mention is in the NRA Basic Pistol materials.

The key to teaching these classes, is being a teacher. Since I know arms pretty good, I think my only want would be to take a "teacher" class, focused solely on how to deliver messages, etc.
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  #25  
Old 05-10-2018, 09:34 AM
jeffbird jeffbird is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1911_Kid View Post
For what NRA courseware are you referring to?

The NRA instructor course is for NRA materials. If you are comparing the two instructor courses for say a plumber who has rarely fired his 1022 or 38special, then perhaps the diff is noticeable?

For folks who know firearms to start with, the NRA instructor cert is a formality to be able to teach the NRA materials.
The NRA instructor for pistol course. There is a lot more to providing quality instruction to the student especially at entry level than "for folks who know firearms to start with,..."

The NRA written materials are very good quality. But, for learning how to teach how to shoot, the NRA pistol instructor course does not provide that information. Knowing how to shoot is a beginning point, but learning how to teach also is important for the instructor and the future students. Taking Tom Givens' instructor development course was eye-opening in many respects, and I definitely recommend it. fwiw - about 1/4 of my class did not pass his final shooting tests including some who appeared to be very good shooters, not just plumbers with a 10/22.

The goal should be to teach them real skills to begin to have a clue how to use a pistol if they need to, not just take their money and give them a pretty piece of paper.

Last edited by jeffbird; 05-10-2018 at 10:03 AM.
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