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  #1  
Old 09-15-2020, 04:49 PM
mr.tickle mr.tickle is offline
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Renaissance Wax

Recently bought some Renaissance Wax and seeing people recommending it for the metal and stocks of their guns. I have been applying a thin layer of grease on metal surfaces in the barrel channel and below the wood line on my guns. However I am coming across more posts about oil rot, so I am looking for a replacement for my grease.

I plan on using renaissance wax on blued guns but I write all this to ask, can I use it on parkerized finishes? Or will it work on them?
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  #2  
Old 09-15-2020, 06:24 PM
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AZ Husker AZ Husker is offline
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Don't forget your leather. Milt Sparks recommend ir for their fine holsters and equipment.
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Old 09-15-2020, 06:50 PM
sevenL4 sevenL4 is offline
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Ren wax is used by museums on many objects to protect them. Wood and metal are treated. Oil rather than grease on friction surfaces is generally better than grease. Blued and parkerized steel can be protected from rust with Ren wax. I used a paste car wax on my guns for years before finding out about the superior qualities of Ren wax. Clean everything thoroughly before you apply it.
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  #4  
Old 09-15-2020, 07:31 PM
dfariswheel dfariswheel is offline
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Wax works well under wood to prevent rust.
I use it under pistol grips to prevent rusting. Even stainless will rust especially under rubber grips.

I apply a medium-heavy coat and DON'T wipe it off.
Just let it dry 20 or 30 minutes and reassemble.

Wax also works well on parkerized metal.
Years ago some military personnel issued the 1911 pistol would coat it with Cosmoline, which is a waxy-like material and bake the gun in an oven.
The Cosmoline would melt into the parkerized finish and protect the metal from harsh conditions.

I don't think I'd do that with an actual wax, but wax will protect metal under wood, including parkerized steel.
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  #5  
Old 09-16-2020, 03:54 AM
FDM1 FDM1 is offline
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Works great on my blued revolver. Won’t disappoint.
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  #6  
Old 09-16-2020, 12:05 PM
f1racefan f1racefan is offline
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If you're trying to prohibit rust, why not use a regular rust prohibitor designed for metal? I suggest reading this article. It's probably much more scientific than forum opinions.

http://www.dayattherange.com/?page_id=3667
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  #7  
Old 09-17-2020, 06:03 AM
Jolly Rogers Jolly Rogers is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by f1racefan View Post
If you're trying to prohibit rust, why not use a regular rust prohibitor designed for metal? I suggest reading this article. It's probably much more scientific than forum opinions.

http://www.dayattherange.com/?page_id=3667
Why use Rig#2 oil when Rig stands for Rust Inhibiting Grease?
Joe
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  #8  
Old 09-17-2020, 07:38 AM
f1racefan f1racefan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jolly Rogers View Post
Why use Rig#2 oil when Rig stands for Rust Inhibiting Grease?
Joe
If I had to venture a guess, I'd say that the original acronym for the product (RIG) turned into the brand name, which lead to their oil product being named "RIG oil".

BTW...I've used RIG grease for years on all my pistol slide rails. Even after storing pistols for months, when I get them back out and take them apart, the grease is still there. Can't say the same for oils I've used.
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