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  #1  
Old 09-11-2020, 12:49 AM
diesel3 diesel3 is offline
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colt classic ss finish

I have a new colt O1911c in stainless
the question I have is this normal for colt?
at first I thought they copper brazed the front sight post on but I seen another one like it with a front dove tailed sight so I figured I would ask the group about it.
thanks
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  #2  
Old 09-11-2020, 12:53 AM
diesel3 diesel3 is offline
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more pictures
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  #3  
Old 09-11-2020, 08:12 AM
Mark Robinson Mark Robinson is offline
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The 1911 Classic model is manufactured with a staked-on front sight. The part that extends down through the top of the slide is called the "tenon".

If you saw one with a dovetailed front sight it was done aftermarket or it was a mix up at Colt.
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  #4  
Old 09-11-2020, 11:12 AM
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dsk dsk is offline
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I think he's asking about the copper color inside the slide. Unfortunately I don't have a clue as I haven't seen that before. Since stainless steel is naked (no finish on it) I can only assume it's reside or old oil from machining. See if it comes off with solvent, and if it doesn't contact Colt and ask them (good luck finding a CS rep with more than one active brain cell).
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Old 09-11-2020, 11:23 AM
fnfalman fnfalman is online now
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I’ve seen this weird copper color in some of my stainless steel Colts. My most recent one: Gold Cup Trophy, has it. Doesn’t seem to affect shooting or cause rust, so I just left it as-is and chalk it up to Colt’s idiosyncratic fit and finish. Or lack of quality control.



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Old 09-11-2020, 12:24 PM
diesel3 diesel3 is offline
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I just got off the phone with colt about that copper color.
they said that they stake and brazed the front sight it's only really noticeable on the stainless guns because of the naked finish.
mine is a June 2020 mfg date.
thanks for all the help and I hope this thread helps others with this question
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  #7  
Old 09-11-2020, 12:33 PM
diesel3 diesel3 is offline
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Mark Robinson
correct sir on the front sight but the other stainless gun was a colt competition I believe it had Novak cuts front and rear with fiber optic out front, wich is why I didn't understand that guns front sight is dove tailed so no reason for staking or brazing
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Old 09-11-2020, 12:38 PM
diesel3 diesel3 is offline
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fnfal man
my slide is just like yours thanks for the pics.
my gun shoots great but that brazing had me wondering
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  #9  
Old 09-11-2020, 01:38 PM
fnfalman fnfalman is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by diesel3 View Post
fnfal man
my slide is just like yours thanks for the pics.
my gun shoots great but that brazing had me wondering
Since that my gun has dovetail front sight, there should be no brazing involved, but who the heck knows what Colt does behind closed doors.
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  #10  
Old 09-11-2020, 02:22 PM
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So they stake AND braze them, and they still manage to come loose or fall off???

Latest example: https://forums.1911forum.com/showthread.php?t=1024876

BTW that copper color couldn't possibly have come from brazing. It's everywhere EXCEPT under where the front sight goes! Just more proof that Colt's CS people are completely clueless.
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Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1970 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.

Last edited by dsk; 09-11-2020 at 02:25 PM.
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  #11  
Old 09-11-2020, 02:26 PM
fnfalman fnfalman is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dsk View Post
So they stake AND braze them, and they still manage to come loose or fall off???

Latest example: https://forums.1911forum.com/showthread.php?t=1024876

BTW that copper color couldn't possibly have come from brazing. It's everywhere EXCEPT under where the front sight goes! Just more proof that Colt's CS people are completely clueless.
I donít think Colt brazes the tenons.
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  #12  
Old 09-11-2020, 02:31 PM
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I didn't think so either. But according to the OP that's what the CS nimrod said...
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Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1970 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.
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  #13  
Old 09-11-2020, 02:47 PM
Mark Robinson Mark Robinson is offline
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Originally Posted by diesel3 View Post
Mark Robinson
correct sir on the front sight but the other stainless gun was a colt competition I believe it had Novak cuts front and rear with fiber optic out front, wich is why I didn't understand that guns front sight is dove tailed so no reason for staking or brazing
Yep, I misunderstood your initial question -- my apologies.
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  #14  
Old 09-11-2020, 06:57 PM
Col. Colt Col. Colt is offline
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A tenon sight looks like it grew there. A dovetail looks, well, ugly by comparison. Probably Colt wanted the original look on that Model.

A properly staked Tenon has absolutely No Need of Brazing - you have in fact a Riveted Assembly that will NEVER come loose. The operative word is "Properly".
The slide and sight are put into a fixture, and the sight held firmly in it's proper position. A swaging tool is driven through the fixture, making the rivet out of the "tenon" tail.

Ideally, you should take a Dremel or Foredom Tool and make a small hemispherical cut inside the slide directly under the Tenon - making a larger "Rivet head" that will not ever come loose. I do not know if Colt does that. Watched it done regularly with a Miniature Machine 1911 Staking tool - Trijicon made one, too - (on night sights, too) at an American Gunsmith Guild gunsmithy - and he never had a come back. CC
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  #15  
Old 09-11-2020, 10:36 PM
diesel3 diesel3 is offline
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thanks for all the feed back, what colt customer service told me doesn't make any sense that's why I come here a lot of knowledgeable people on here. glad to be a member
thanks! and shoot safe
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  #16  
Old 09-15-2020, 02:08 PM
papa1 papa1 is offline
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I'm fairly certain the bronze color you are seeing is from the machining or broaching process in which heat and machine oils are discoloring the surface of the steel. You will notice that every area that has the bead blast finish will be back to looking like stainless steel or any surface that has had a fine finish cut which is low heat will look like shinny stainless steel.

Last edited by papa1; 09-15-2020 at 02:09 PM. Reason: addition
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  #17  
Old 09-15-2020, 05:51 PM
straightcut straightcut is offline
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I wasn't aware that one could braze stainless steel? I've heard of silver soldering stainless, but not traditional brass rod brazing. At any rate, I think you guys are correct in that there was no brazing involved with this sight.
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  #18  
Old 09-15-2020, 06:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by papa1 View Post
I'm fairly certain the bronze color you are seeing is from the machining or broaching process in which heat and machine oils are discoloring the surface of the steel. You will notice that every area that has the bead blast finish will be back to looking like stainless steel or any surface that has had a fine finish cut which is low heat will look like shinny stainless steel.
Unfortunately this is further proof of how Colt does a half-ass job of building and finishing their pistols. The inside of the slide should have the deep tooling marks polished out and bead-blasted, just like EVERY. SINGLE. OTHER. GUN. MANUFACTURER does. Leaving it like this, with deep gouges visible and apparent machining oil stains all over the inside is something we used to see back in the early 1980s from the junk 1911 manufacturers. Yet Colt is doing it, and they still expect people to pay $1000 for one of their guns.
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Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1970 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.
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  #19  
Old 09-15-2020, 06:57 PM
fnfalman fnfalman is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by papa1 View Post
I'm fairly certain the bronze color you are seeing is from the machining or broaching process in which heat and machine oils are discoloring the surface of the steel. You will notice that every area that has the bead blast finish will be back to looking like stainless steel or any surface that has had a fine finish cut which is low heat will look like shinny stainless steel.
That could be true. Except that I just disassembled my Competition Series 70 abd itís white.



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  #20  
Old 09-15-2020, 07:57 PM
dfariswheel dfariswheel is offline
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I suspect the brassy color is from the slide being heat treated and not given any final surface finish.
The color is from the color change during the process, which is usually cleaned up by the final machining and finishing.

I also have a really odd Colt color situation.
The bore of my stainless steel Colt Series 80 MK IV I bought in the mid-80's has an OD GREEN colored bore.

No it's not copper fouling or anything on the bore, that's the color of the stainless steel.
All I can guess is it's an artifact of heat treating and passivating.
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