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  #1  
Old 01-02-2020, 05:18 PM
1911crazy 1911crazy is offline
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Iím old school, set in my ways

I was taught to,,,,
With a rockchucker press.
1. Clean and decal the brass, then a coarse media tumble.
2. Size the brass, case length.
3. Chamfer the edge inside and out.
3. flare the case mouth
4. Clean the primer pocket.
5. Then a fine media polish.
6. Prime the brass
7. Charge the brass powder.
8. Seat the bullet
9. Crimp or taper crimp.

I still do 1 through 6 by hand then use a progressive press to finish them.

I guess I canít break free from what I was taught.
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  #2  
Old 01-02-2020, 05:27 PM
GunBugBit GunBugBit is offline
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I suppose I'm "new old school". I learned to reload on a Dillon 550, following the advice of my competition buddies, a Brian Enos video on competition reloading, the video that came with the 550, the 550 printed User Manual, and information from forums like this.

I've made most of the mistakes that can be made and that's where the real learning happened.
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  #3  
Old 01-02-2020, 06:15 PM
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You may be set in your ways, but at some point you did move to a progressive, so you have learned at least a few "new tricks".

Are you happy with your procedure? Looking for some tips?

Or are you saying that "This is the way I do it, by Thunder, it's right, it's the best and there's nothing you can do to make me change"

Because I'm good with either answer

If you're happy then rock on!!!! We must each walk according to our own lights, so proceed as you think best. If we can't enjoy what we are doing then why bother?

But if you are open to suggestions, then there are redundancies and steps in your process that are costing you time and effort without providing a demonstrable gain. You do have a progressive, but you are not using it to its potential.

Which is fine, if that's what you want to do. Just throwing it out there...

Old Dogs like me can learn new tricks, but sometimes it takes a shock collar
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  #4  
Old 01-02-2020, 07:06 PM
bob finger bob finger is offline
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Take heart my friend you are not alone.

I load 9mm and .45 ACP on a Dillon SDB without a deprime punch and without primer feed. I am anal and cannot abide not seeing the primer during the loading process. Like you I de-prime on a single stage press then wet tumble and when dry I use a bench priming tool to prime my brass. Then it is on to the SDB and making good ammo.

Sure it takes more time, but I'm retired so it matters not for time I have. I have yet to experience my first bad cartridge using the above method. I'm happy with how I do it. bob
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  #5  
Old 01-02-2020, 07:07 PM
jmorris jmorris is online now
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If you’re happy, so am I. Doesn’t matter how old you are.
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  #6  
Old 01-02-2020, 07:36 PM
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Grandpas50AE Grandpas50AE is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snow View Post
You may be set in your ways, but at some point you did move to a progressive, so you have learned at least a few "new tricks".

Are you happy with your procedure? Looking for some tips?

Or are you saying that "This is the way I do it, by Thunder, it's right, it's the best and there's nothing you can do to make me change"

Because I'm good with either answer

If you're happy then rock on!!!! We must each walk according to our own lights, so proceed as you think best. If we can't enjoy what we are doing then why bother?

But if you are open to suggestions, then there are redundancies and steps in your process that are costing you time and effort without providing a demonstrable gain. You do have a progressive, but you are not using it to its potential.

Which is fine, if that's what you want to do. Just throwing it out there...

Old Dogs like me can learn new tricks, but sometimes it takes a shock collar
As expected from esteemed member snow, there is a lot of wisdom in this post. As long as you are happy with the results, and wish to keep what you are comfortable with, rock on!
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  #7  
Old 01-02-2020, 08:40 PM
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Tom Freeman Tom Freeman is offline
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I prefer to shoot, not spend time at the bench. But I am new school I guess.
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  #8  
Old 01-02-2020, 09:16 PM
jjfitch jjfitch is online now
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To the OP:

For precision pistol, revolver and rifle I follow a similar procedure except I only tumble clean once.

For general range use and pistol games I load on a 550 or SDB following the manufacturer's guidance.

Until recently I was shooting upwards of 10K rounds a year.

It was nice some years ago being sponsored, shooting Winchester ammo for practice and matches. The department paid match fees and some travel expenses too!

Smiles, all the best in 2020!
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  #9  
Old 01-03-2020, 07:17 AM
Nitro.45 Nitro.45 is offline
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Itís all about time, the volume you shoot and the love of the process. I personally like the loading process, but just donít have the time to go nuts with such a granular approach. To each his own, unless of course one professes (not the OP) that a Loadmaster is as good as a Dillon or LnL. There is a limit to how much time one should be allowed to use for completed rounds!
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  #10  
Old 01-03-2020, 08:40 AM
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apipeguy apipeguy is online now
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1911crazy, I’m in the same boat as you and I load around 10,000 a year give or take.

1. Dry tumble in corn cob.
2. Size/deprime.
3. Wet tumble and sort by headstamp.
4. Flare and then prime by hand with an RCBS Universal, typically in batches of 1,000.
5. Dump powder in tray of 50 cases.
6. Seat bullet on single stage press.
7. Crimp and check each round with gauge and place in 100 round MTM case.

Did just a small batch of 200 .45’s yesterday and need to crimp and box those up today. I’ve been using a single stage press since the 70’s and doubt I’ll ever change. I do enjoy my time in the reloading room unless I’m less than a month away from a shooting trip and need to load a few thousand for the wife and I to take, then it does become work.

Just finishing up steps 1 thru 3 on 6,500 9mm cases that my daughter dropped of to me in the fall and that I did not get to right away.

Being retired does help with time management.
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  #11  
Old 01-03-2020, 09:05 AM
glider glider is offline
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I understand completely, I load with a rock chuker myself, RCBS powder drop and weigh every 10th charge. RCBS hand prime and seat and crimp in different steps. And of course tumble before we do anything. I do like to lube my cases, it's just smoother. I have been thinking about a Dillon square deal press set up for 9mm and leave it just for 9.
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  #12  
Old 01-03-2020, 09:12 AM
joepilot joepilot is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by apipeguy View Post
1. Dry tumble in corn cob.
2. Size/deprime.
3. Wet tumble and sort by headstamp.
4. Flare and then prime by hand with an RCBS Universal, typically in batches of 1,000.
5. Dump powder in tray of 50 cases.
6. Seat bullet on single stage press.
7. Crimp and check each round with gauge and place in 100 round MTM case.

Iíve been using a single stage press since the 70ís and doubt Iíll ever change.
This describes my process almost exactly. I enjoy the reloading process, and always do small batches, so it works well for me. I like having direct round-by-round contact with each step in the process. Some would call that anal. Get over it!
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  #13  
Old 01-03-2020, 10:04 AM
Jim Watson Jim Watson is online now
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I am an old guy, too; my Rockchucker is date stamped '71.
But reloading is just something I do to get ready to go shooting, not a prime activity of its own, and I minimize the workload.

For bulk pistol ammo suitable for USPSA and IDPA:
1. Tumble in nuthull.
2. LIGHT spritz of spray lube.
3. Feed Dillon.
4. 100% cartridge gauge.

I single stage target rifle ammo with a good deal more attention, and BPCR can get very tedious. I don't load plinking rifle ammo, the rare plink is done with a .22.
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  #14  
Old 01-03-2020, 10:16 AM
markwell markwell is offline
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When we started "combat shooting" back in 1977 we loaded all our ammo on a Rockchucker. Eventually, we graduated to a C&H inline progressive which was better but had many quirks. Then we discovered Dillon and we currently run three; 2 550s and a 650 and, we still hate too load ammo.

Having always been more into shooting than loading ammo, we've often wondered about those who say they "enjoy" loading ammo. We've always used the analogy of cutting wood to heat your home (which we still do). From our perspective, we feel that if you enjoy wood cutting or loading ammo after 50 years you've maybe not done enough of either. That's my story and I'm sticking to it.
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  #15  
Old 01-03-2020, 10:24 AM
Jim Watson Jim Watson is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markwell View Post
Eventually, we graduated to a C&H inline progressive which was better but had many quirks.
You can say that again.
I have one rusting in the garage, its dies transplanted to a Dillon head.
I sure wish I had paid the extra for a Star.
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  #16  
Old 01-03-2020, 10:59 AM
GunBugBit GunBugBit is offline
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There's something to be said for each component of each round passing through your hands, with careful inspection, making sure everything is just right.
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  #17  
Old 01-03-2020, 11:12 AM
flechero flechero is offline
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A phrase I remember from pre-marital counseling comes to mind:

"Not wrong, just different"

Some view loading as a means to an end to feed the shooting habit, while and others view loading as a 2nd hobby all together that happens to compliment their shooting. For the record, you can be the latter type and still load volume calibers on a progressive.
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  #18  
Old 01-03-2020, 12:20 PM
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apipeguy apipeguy is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flechero View Post
A phrase I remember from pre-marital counseling comes to mind:

"Not wrong, just different"

Some view loading as a means to an end to feed the shooting habit, while and others view loading as a 2nd hobby all together that happens to compliment their shooting. For the record, you can be the latter type and still load volume calibers on a progressive.
Agree.
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  #19  
Old 01-03-2020, 01:04 PM
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Rifter Rifter is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snow View Post
You may be set in your ways, but at some point you did move to a progressive, so you have learned at least a few "new tricks".

Are you happy with your procedure? Looking for some tips?

Or are you saying that "This is the way I do it, by Thunder, it's right, it's the best and there's nothing you can do to make me change"

Because I'm good with either answer

If you're happy then rock on!!!! We must each walk according to our own lights, so proceed as you think best. If we can't enjoy what we are doing then why bother?

But if you are open to suggestions, then there are redundancies and steps in your process that are costing you time and effort without providing a demonstrable gain. You do have a progressive, but you are not using it to its potential.

Which is fine, if that's what you want to do. Just throwing it out there...

Old Dogs like me can learn new tricks, but sometimes it takes a shock collar

Hell, yes, us old dogs can learn new tricks! We just don't like it when a bunch of young pups tell us we HAVE to do it that way. But we also frequently know how to do things those young pups have never heard of.
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  #20  
Old 01-03-2020, 02:03 PM
Oldfut808 Oldfut808 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1911crazy View Post
I was taught to,,,,
With a rockchucker press.
1. Clean and decal the brass, then a coarse media tumble.
2. Size the brass, case length.
3. Chamfer the edge inside and out.
3. flare the case mouth
4. Clean the primer pocket.
5. Then a fine media polish.
6. Prime the brass
7. Charge the brass powder.
8. Seat the bullet
9. Crimp or taper crimp.

I still do 1 through 6 by hand then use a progressive press to finish them.

I guess I canít break free from what I was taught.
==============
Well, that is an admirable workflow, but you did not specify what caliber you are doing, nor the purpose of whatever that ammo is.
I think a more reasonable approach is to adapt the workflow to the intended purpose.
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  #21  
Old 01-03-2020, 03:56 PM
Andyk Andyk is offline
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Do you chamber pistol rounds? I shoot as much as 1000 rounds a month, not sure it would be worth it. I've tried it in the past and never noticed much difference. I do with rifle rounds but that's only a couple hundred a month and not every month.
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  #22  
Old 01-03-2020, 08:17 PM
scubadad scubadad is offline
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I stepped up to a turret press a year ago. Do whatever works for you and be happy
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  #23  
Old 01-04-2020, 09:30 AM
Nitro.45 Nitro.45 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markwell View Post
When we started "combat shooting" back in 1977 we loaded all our ammo on a Rockchucker. Eventually, we graduated to a C&H inline progressive which was better but had many quirks. Then we discovered Dillon and we currently run three; 2 550s and a 650 and, we still hate too load ammo.

Having always been more into shooting than loading ammo, we've often wondered about those who say they "enjoy" loading ammo. We've always used the analogy of cutting wood to heat your home (which we still do). From our perspective, we feel that if you enjoy wood cutting or loading ammo after 50 years you've maybe not done enough of either. That's my story and I'm sticking to it.
I guess itís all in ones perspective. I too heat primarily with wood. Going out in the woods with the guys, the smell of running chainsaws and fresh cut wood........there is a sense of accomplishment and a bit of pride about not giving in to the BS runaround in the world today. I wouldnít trade deer camp either. As far as loading goes, if itís your business, itís work. I like it because I can control what I make and the same satisfaction comes out of it and I do not look at it as work. It takes me back in time remembering loading with dad.
The byproduct?? $30 a month gas bill in the winter and $5 a box ammo. Now who wouldnít want that??
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  #24  
Old 01-04-2020, 01:36 PM
Alland Alland is offline
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My process is a lot simpler for handgun ammo.
1. Tumble in walnut with nufinish.
2. If 9mm cull out crimped primer brass.
3. Load in a Dillon 550.
4. Store in ammo cans.
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  #25  
Old 01-05-2020, 09:45 AM
Nitro.45 Nitro.45 is offline
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Hey! You just tripped on something......thatís what the progressive was invented for! Thatís pretty much my caveman approach as well, but I wet tumble. Supergrade accuracy ammo is done on the turret, but I go through far less of that.
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