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  #1  
Old 12-08-2019, 08:31 PM
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AndyC AndyC is offline
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Hot-glue bullets

You old-timers will remember these.

A younger friend of mine does security-work and is always wanting to improve his shooting, but he doesn't make a lot of money to pay for range-fees and ammo. I've decided to assist by introducing him to hot-glue bullets - that way he can shoot inside his apartment and incur very little expense (basically just primers).



Now, I used to cast wax bullets when I worked for an armed response company in Cape Town so we could easily, cheaply and safely practice room-clearance and the like inside our company HQ - and they were pretty accurate and fed well when cycled by hand from the magazine of our CZ75s. Problem was, they took a long time to cool and they bent after a few firings, so I decided this would likely be more efficient. I've never made the hot-glue version, so I had some fun experimenting yesterday with a new glue-gun and a 2nd-hand 9mm Lee mold.



The simplest way I found is to spray Pam inside the mold-block faces and cavities as well as on top of the sprue-plate - you can cast 10-12 glue bullets before they start to stick a little and it needs more Pam. It also makes removing the glue-sprue easier if you drag glue between the cavity-holes on top of the sprue-plate too (as in the photo below) - that way the sprue just peels off in one go.



It takes a minute or two for the glue to solidify enough to remove the bullets, so it's kinda slow going - I found it best to do some chores and throw bullets in between.

With that said, these are not people-safe - they WILL welt severely (don't ask how I know this), so don't shoot them at anyone. They're reusable and are easily-stopped by a few layers of towel etc behind a cardboard target - I don't know how long these glue versions will last, but they seem to be pretty solid yet slightly rubbery.
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Last edited by AndyC; 12-08-2019 at 08:39 PM.
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Old 12-08-2019, 09:49 PM
CowboyShooter CowboyShooter is offline
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powered by just a primer ? or do u adda very few grains of powder ?
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Old 12-08-2019, 10:01 PM
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Pretty neat, it's a lot like the plastic and rubber bullets CCI used to sell along the same lines. Personally however I prefer to use realistic Airsoft guns instead for indoor or backyard training. That way I get a semi-auto weapon instead of having to hand-cycle for each shot. Back when revolvers were king however training bullets like these were very popular.

BTW when shooting stuff like this indoors like in a small apartment, be aware that the primers are throwing small amounts of lead into the atmosphere (unless you use lead-free). It's probably a good idea to have a fan running or windows open (assuming it's not loud enough for other tenants to hear it). Also wipe down the kitchen counters before handling food.
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Old 12-08-2019, 10:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CowboyShooter View Post
powered by just a primer ? or do u adda very few grains of powder ?
Primer only.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dsk View Post
BTW when shooting stuff like this indoors like in a small apartment, be aware that the primers are throwing small amounts of lead into the atmosphere (unless you use lead-free). It's probably a good idea to have a fan running or windows open (assuming it's not loud enough for other tenants to hear it). Also wipe down the kitchen counters before handling food.
Ah, yes - good reminder, thanks.
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Old 12-08-2019, 11:01 PM
markm markm is online now
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Sounds like fun. I use to use the Speer plastic bullets and cowboy wax bullets in my wheel guns. I found that drilling and countersinking cases to use shotgun primers worked a lot better. But I couldn't believe how dirty you guns got after shooting those. I don't think I'd use them indoors though for the contamination mentioned.
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Old 12-09-2019, 06:57 AM
Nitro.45 Nitro.45 is offline
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What type of buildup do you get in the barrel, if any?
How many times can they be used? Do the grooves tear them up?
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Old 12-09-2019, 11:26 AM
AlaskaMike AlaskaMike is offline
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I've done that for some .38 revolvers. I think about the only thing I did differently is that I smeared some case lube around the glue bullets before I hand pressed them into the .38 cases.

I don't recall any residue left in the revolver barrels at all. The rifling didn't seem to harm them at all, but the bases were very sooty and got tore up after a couple firings.

Penetration is surprisingly good with these considering how light they are. With my .38 loads they'd penetrate about 3 layers of cardboard from about 5 ft.
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Old 12-09-2019, 03:10 PM
brickeyee brickeyee is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CowboyShooter View Post
powered by just a primer ? or do u adda very few grains of powder ?
I used to press open case mouths through a block of paraffin and use ONLY a primer.

With full riot gear (body padding and full face shield and even some neck protection) on the intended 'victim' it was safe even at close range.

For about 6 years I was the first guy that got to train the local police 'cadets' in initial 'close quarters.'
Like a few feet.
Mostly about how you would NOT be able to stop an arbitrary person with a drawn and cocked revolver pointed at you without getting shot.

The range instructors taught the 'distance' rule back then.
Back away.
You had better be a better shot than a likely opponent, so back away.
Make him shoot further.

It usually only took one or two guys for everyone to be convinced.
Though one guy (who later didn't pass anyway) had to be shot three times.
I got him in the bottom of the face shield once (would have bee a middle of neck hit), and twice in the chest (right over upper left chest) before he was convinced it might not be a good move.

The guys used to joke I was the local 'cop killer' and they would hate to meet me under real circumstances.
I was also a Paramedic and helped provide their basic first aid classes.

I would be worried the hot glue is harder than paraffin.
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Old 12-09-2019, 09:32 PM
Oldfut808 Oldfut808 is offline
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For revolvers, you may have to enlarge the flash hole or the primers might back out and jam the cylinder
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  #10  
Old 12-10-2019, 07:37 AM
Nitro.45 Nitro.45 is offline
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Thatís a good point!
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Old 12-11-2019, 09:55 PM
brickeyee brickeyee is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nitro.45 View Post
Thatís a good point!
Anyone that has used very reduced loads in a revolver knows that.
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Old 12-12-2019, 07:58 AM
Nitro.45 Nitro.45 is offline
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Yup, thatís why itís a good point even though I have never run into such a problem even with my lightest bunny farts and wadcutters. Plastic bullets and three grains of powder perhaps. Never with lead having a trajectory other than a curve to the target stand.
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Old 12-20-2019, 08:24 PM
Capt. Methane Capt. Methane is offline
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Somewhere I might still have some plastic bullets for .38/.357. Got them a long time ago to practice with a revolver. They were only powered by a primer and worked very well and were quite accurate out to about 25 feet or so and as far as I remember I never wore any of them out...
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Old 12-23-2019, 12:25 AM
Maj Dad Maj Dad is offline
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I used (still do occassionally) primer-only driven paraffin wax bullets in my 44 (spl or mag, same-same), and they would dent hard old shed wood at 25-30 feet. Definitely not safe to use on someone without full protective gear, but kick-butt on stray growling dogs in your yard. Also a lot of fun, but I don't think inside is the place to use them. I also would melt some in a cake pan so that the wax bullets weren't quite as thick as the paraffin block (Gulf wax for canning was what I used in rural Georgia). Very accurate, I would add, all things considered.
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