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  #1  
Old 03-25-2020, 10:48 AM
covid-1911 covid-1911 is offline
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New to gun ownership

Hi! I hope you're all doing OK in this time of crisis. I'm planning on buying my first gun and will be needing everybody's help/advice for that.

I have loved the looks of the 1911 pistol since I was a kid. I'm now a grown up, middle-aged skinny guy (5' 7" height, weighing 140 lbs). I guess it's not to late to get into this sports/hobby? Will I be able to handle a .45 just fine or should I start with a 9mm?

Thank you all in advance and y'all stay safe.
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  #2  
Old 03-25-2020, 10:54 AM
bullet45acp bullet45acp is offline
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the recoil on a .45acp is not really that harsh.
You will be fine.
That being said, I always say your first gun should be a good .22.
Like a Ruger Mk IV. A much better training tool, much less expensive to feed.
Learn how to shoot that well - then move up.
Just my $0.02

Josh
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  #3  
Old 03-25-2020, 11:03 AM
bradsvette bradsvette is offline
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First off, I chuckled when I saw your username. If you've never shot a handgun before, any reasonable caliber is going to be a bit challenging at first. I'd borrow or rent a 22 and shoot it first to learn the mechanics of handgun shooting. Having a certified shooting instructor there with you to help teach you would be ideal. Once you're comfortable with the mechanics, the gunshot noise, and the recoil, then you can go to a gun store, pick up various pistols and see which ones appeal to you. 1911s are great guns and have their own attributes and unique qualities. A full sized, all-steel 9mm 1911 would be a great, first gun due to it's very low recoil.

Last edited by bradsvette; 03-25-2020 at 11:08 AM.
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  #4  
Old 03-25-2020, 11:41 AM
covid-1911 covid-1911 is offline
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Thanks for the replies. I really want the looks of a 1911 type pistol. Is a Browning 1911-22 A1 good?

I forgot to mention I used to shoot BB pistols powered by springs (in my early 20's). I didn't have to go to a gun range shooting those. Is that enough of an experience to skip .22 caliber and head straight to 9mm?
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  #5  
Old 03-25-2020, 01:04 PM
Steven1127 Steven1127 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bullet45acp View Post
the recoil on a .45acp is not really that harsh.
You will be fine.
That being said, I always say your first gun should be a good .22.
Like a Ruger Mk IV. A much better training tool, much less expensive to feed.
Learn how to shoot that well - then move up.
Just my $0.02

Josh
What he says about the 22 is on the money.
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  #6  
Old 03-25-2020, 03:07 PM
mdellis49 mdellis49 is offline
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I understand your desire to go directly to a centerfire, that said you sought the advice of seasoned shooters and it is unlikely that anyone here will deviate from advising you to start with a .22. You will never regret purchasing a .22 and it will likely be one of your favorites. A personal favorite of mine is the Browning Buck Mark. Excellent ergonomics, thumb safety, mag release, and slide release are all similar in location to that of a 1911. Excellent sights and trigger. Good Luck and welcome
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  #7  
Old 03-25-2020, 03:16 PM
tightloops tightloops is online now
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If a 1911 is what you are aiming for then I would say starting off with most any of the 1911's
offered in 22 would be the way to go. That way you will be able to become proficient with the controls, and feel of the 45 you move into at a later date.
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  #8  
Old 03-25-2020, 04:11 PM
VIS35 VIS35 is offline
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Hi from North Dakota The felt recoil from my models 1911 with GI ball ammo is no more than my Hi-Powers with NATO ball.
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  #9  
Old 03-25-2020, 04:52 PM
vortec vortec is offline
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Quote:
I have loved the looks of the 1911 pistol since I was a kid. I'm now a grown up,
My first 1911 was a Delta Elite. Rather than shoot it a bunch without knowing what I was doing, I signed up for Gunsite 250. That was a few years ago, the adventure has never stopped.

https://www.gunsite.com/classes/250-...-pistol-class/
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  #10  
Old 03-25-2020, 05:11 PM
motorsporting motorsporting is offline
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If you want both, get a 1911 in a "carry" round, and then look at some of the slide options in a .22 to add. It depends on how much $$ you want to spend. I shot .22 rifles growing up, but my first pistol was a 9mm. Then I spent a LONG time loving the 1911 in nothing but .45. I have since "returned" to 9mm, mostly in "striker-fired" designs. If you know someone with several to try, or have a nearby range that offers the same, it is worth your time and money to do so. However, if you are in need of something RIGHT now, since they are flying off of the shelf, a Springfield Range Officer is a good starting point (IMHO), in 9mm or .45ACP. If you want to save some money, 9mm ammo is about half as much as .45... Please seek training, once you decide on your choice.
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  #11  
Old 03-25-2020, 05:52 PM
lhawkins lhawkins is offline
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I know this is a 1911 forum and this may be taboo, but you would be better off with a striker fired plastic wonder in 9mm than a 1911 in 45 for your first gun IMHO.

Ammo is going to be way cheaper. The gun will be cheaper. Dry firing is easier. You can put a WML on it. They do make and sell railed 1911. Easier to tear down and run.

My first centerfire pistol was a BHP in 40. My second was a Colt 1911 in 45. I now shoot almost exclusively 9mm in M&Ps if I shoot a bottom feeder.

The M&P has a grip angle close to a 1911. It feels more 1911ish than a Glock.

The 45 in a 1911 is really not that bad as the heavy metal frame and slide soaks up a lot of the energy.

As others have also stated, a 22 is also a good option for a starter pistol.
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  #12  
Old 03-25-2020, 06:01 PM
chrysanthemum chrysanthemum is online now
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I'll not disagree with the sound recommendations to start with a .22 chambering. That is indisputably sound advice. I'll also not disagree with suggestions that a different gun might possibly suit you better.

But I personally started, as an adult, with a .45acp 1911. And I'm not remotely close to resembling an NFL linebacker.

Like you, I'd always admired the 1911, especially its historical lineage. I figured that if it worked fine as a first handgun for probably thousands of young men entering the services in WWI, WWII, Korean War, and Vietnam, it cannot be a "too-difficult" first gun.

While respecting the sound .22 caliber advice, starting out with a .45acp 1911 worked out just fine for me. I have absolutely zero regrets about starting with a 1911.

If you're middle aged, you might not have the same time horizon as a teenager or 20-something.

If you should happen to choose the 1911, go with full size, all steel. If concerned about the recoil, try 160gr bullets rather than the traditional 230gr bullets. Also if concerned about recoil, you could limit your first range sessions to no more than 50 rounds...for most people, it is the cumulative effects of firing many rounds that bring out adverse effects of recoil. When you're no longer looking forward to the next shot, it's time to stop.

A 9mm 1911 would also be a rational alternative IMHO. I'll not tout it as a better selection for you, as it's hard to predict such thing in advance for a given individual. Recoil/muzzle flip would be a less.

I'd suggest going with your intuition (after considering everything in this thread), make a decision, whatever it is, and don't look back.
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Last edited by chrysanthemum; 03-25-2020 at 06:30 PM.
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  #13  
Old 03-26-2020, 09:18 AM
Capt. Methane Capt. Methane is online now
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Welcome!

Stay well and choose wisely.

The little Browning 1911-22 is cool, economical and smaller and lighter but you may be better served by one of the full sized variants like the GSG.

https://www.budsgunshop.com/search.p...sg%201911%2022

I don't have one and don't know how they feel but they are the same physical size and the safety and magazine release are in the same places...

I'm not sure about the striker-fired polymer solution recommended. Yes, they almost always have larger magazines but many of them lack an external safety and my view is that no semi-automatic pistol should be with out one (just look at how many cops have "Glocked" themselves or someone else-most famously on video in front of a classroom!).

Further, since your interest is really in 1911's and they have an external safety you wouldn't have to learn to use it-the habit will be established from day one and it will something you won't have to learn.
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Last edited by Capt. Methane; 03-26-2020 at 09:24 AM.
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  #14  
Old 03-26-2020, 10:16 AM
chrysanthemum chrysanthemum is online now
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^^^

Capt. Methane's last point is very good. +1911

As a person who started with the 1911 and never looked back, I'd have to say that that last point has some definitive merit, and perhaps even more so for someone who is already way past his 20's.
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  #15  
Old 03-26-2020, 10:33 AM
bullet45acp bullet45acp is offline
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I could further suggest that the OP buy a real .45acp 1911 and get a .22 conversion kit for it. I have a SIG 1911 and the SIG 1911 22 top end. It is a great way to practice with your carry gun.

Plenty of companies make 22 top ends, Marvel comes to mind first.

Just a thought.

Josh

(I just looked on Sig's website and I no longer see a 1911 22 cal conversion kit, but as stated there are plenty of others https://www.marvelprecision.com/)
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  #16  
Old 03-26-2020, 02:18 PM
covid-1911 covid-1911 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VIS35 View Post
Hi from North Dakota The felt recoil from my models 1911 with GI ball ammo is no more than my Hi-Powers with NATO ball.
I'm not sure if I understand you. Is there a "glossary section" here I could read through? If not, any external sources I could go to?
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  #17  
Old 03-26-2020, 02:42 PM
covid-1911 covid-1911 is offline
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Originally Posted by chrysanthemum View Post
...But I personally started, as an adult, with a .45acp 1911...
...I figured that if it worked fine as a first handgun for probably thousands of young men entering the services in WWI, WWII, Korean War, and Vietnam, it cannot be a "too-difficult" first gun...
... starting out with a .45acp 1911 worked out just fine for me....
That is what I've been thinking. But I may go with 9mm for the inexpensive ammo.


Quote:
Originally Posted by chrysanthemum View Post
...If you should happen to choose the 1911, go with full size, all steel....
How do I know it's all steel? Can you recommend particular models?


Quote:
Originally Posted by chrysanthemum View Post
...If concerned about the recoil, try 160gr bullets rather than the traditional 230gr bullets...
Awesome tip! Thanks again!
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  #18  
Old 03-26-2020, 02:48 PM
covid-1911 covid-1911 is offline
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Originally Posted by Capt. Methane View Post
The little Browning 1911-22 is cool, economical and smaller and lighter but you may be better served by one of the full sized variants like the GSG.

https://www.budsgunshop.com/search.p...sg%201911%2022
Thanks! That's another option to consider.
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  #19  
Old 03-26-2020, 02:51 PM
covid-1911 covid-1911 is offline
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Originally Posted by bullet45acp View Post
I could further suggest that the OP buy a real .45acp 1911 and get a .22 conversion kit for it. I have a SIG 1911 and the SIG 1911 22 top end. It is a great way to practice with your carry gun.

Plenty of companies make 22 top ends, Marvel comes to mind first.

Just a thought.

Josh

(I just looked on Sig's website and I no longer see a 1911 22 cal conversion kit, but as stated there are plenty of others https://www.marvelprecision.com/)
Whoa! Can the same be done on 9mm versions? Are these model specific?
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  #20  
Old 03-26-2020, 03:10 PM
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9mm 1911s appear to be overtaking .45s in popularity, mostly due to the lower cost of ammo (at least, when there isn't a panic going on). Most .22 conversion units will fit either a 9mm or .45 frame, but always check with the manufacturer before buying.
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Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1970 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.
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  #21  
Old 03-26-2020, 03:58 PM
chrysanthemum chrysanthemum is online now
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Originally Posted by covid-1911 View Post
That is what I've been thinking. But I may go with 9mm for the inexpensive ammo.



How do I know it's all steel? Can you recommend particular models?



Awesome tip! Thanks again!
Manufacturers are pretty honest as to which of their models have lightweight alloy (mostly aluminium) frames and which models have steel frames. (And there's no reason for them not be be forthright about this, as all-steel and lightweight alloy both have a place with their respective customer niches).

One would hope that salespersons in a gun store would be equally forthright. Most would, but I'd hesitate to say "all".

A small magnet will quickly attach itself firmly to a steel frame. But the magnet's attachment to an aluminum frame will be very weak. You shouldn't really need to rely on a magnet, but is a quick telltale indicator if none other is available. An experienced 1911 user can tell merely by picking up a 1911 and sensing its weight.

Without knowing anything about your finances, I'd generally suggest buying the best you can comfortably afford. I'd never begrudge those who choose perfectly functional 1911s at lower cost ranges (e.g., RIA) but I also wouldn't recommend that if you can easily afford something better. Personally, I started with S&W (mid-price) then soon "graduated" to Wilson Combat (high cost). All have been good guns and worth their cost to me; I've kept them all (nearly 10 at last count). Dan Wesson is regularly mentioned in general suggestions, and I think for good reason. I'd (just me) not choose "something" with a plastic mainspring housing unless you know that upfront and are o.k. with it... otherwise it might come as an unwanted surprise later. But all manufacturers represented on this Forum have a place and serve their niche of customers well. I'd choose your manufacturer first, then the specific model (this with respect and understanding of those who view it the other way around).
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Last edited by chrysanthemum; 03-26-2020 at 05:07 PM.
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  #22  
Old 03-27-2020, 09:55 AM
OldA1Guy OldA1Guy is offline
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How about find your dream 1911 and put a .22 conversion on it? Get used to it while plinking at the same time.
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  #23  
Old 03-27-2020, 07:50 PM
covid-1911 covid-1911 is offline
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Well, I "pulled the trigger" and ordered my very first gun. It's a Browning 1911-22 A1 (.22LR). I was going to match it with a 9mm version, but those types (government style) are out of stock. I also ordered 2 extra magazines as I found out the Browning comes with only one.

The relatively small size of the Browning seems a good compromise to help me get my wife and my little boy involved as well.

I feel like I'm getting near my "end", because my bucket list is getting filled faster lately. Like I started doing archery just 8 months ago (got my wife and my son involved as well).

Anyway, thank you guys for those valuable tips. I am sure I'll frequently throw lots of questions here as I try to learn this new hobby.

Last edited by covid-1911; 03-27-2020 at 07:52 PM.
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  #24  
Old 03-27-2020, 09:47 PM
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The .22LR is a great choice for starting out. Low cost and non-existent recoil makes it easy for anyone to shoot. Be advised however that the reliability of the cartridge isn't like centerfire rounds... you'll have the occasional dud or weak round, which is normal. Once the buying panic subsides and ammo is easier to find again you'll have to experiment to find which ammo works the best in your new Browning. Most likely CCI brand, but others may work good as well. Just try to stay away from the cheap "bulk pack" ammo until you've gotten good at clearing malfunctions.
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Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1970 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.
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  #25  
Old 03-28-2020, 07:20 AM
squirrelsnest squirrelsnest is offline
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Welcome to the forums from Virginia
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