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  #1  
Old 04-27-2017, 01:53 AM
wormraper wormraper is offline
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3/4 vs. 1 inch grip screws

I've noticed that half the kits I've bought, or pre-built rifles I've owned or swapped grips on for a friend have 1 inch screws up the pistol grip, and others come with 3/4.... I always thought the "standard" was 1 inch, but even my colt came with a 3/4 inch grip screw in it. Is it a big deal either way?? (I usually get some 1 inch zinc 1/4-28 screws from Ace just out of OCD) just don't know if it REALLY makes a difference, or if those extra 1/4 inch of length will get better grip


also out of curiosity, how many times can you screw and unscrew that screw into the aluminum receiver before theads on the receiver are compromised. I did one gun about 6 or 7 times total since it was my first build and was trying out a handful of grips to see how I liked them. Just don't want to screw up the receiver of all things (it's not like I cross thread, or over torque, nothing is every not hand tightened except for one time I cranked a bit harder than I usually do)

this is more out of bored curiosity than anything

Last edited by wormraper; 04-27-2017 at 02:04 AM.
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  #2  
Old 04-27-2017, 02:10 AM
Texas Guy Texas Guy is offline
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I would think a 3/4 screw would have less chance of bottoming out and stripping threads across many different manufacturers of receivers.


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  #3  
Old 04-27-2017, 05:11 AM
IL308Shooter IL308Shooter is offline
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You could always measure how deep the threaded hole is, then measure how much screw sticks out of the grip with it off the rifle.

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  #4  
Old 04-27-2017, 04:52 PM
BHP BHP is offline
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This is my favorite grip screw for ARs. It is 1/4-28X1 and stainless steel. The head is large diameter which is much more supportive than the small heads on most socket head cap screws(Allens), and doesn't require a long Allen key to reach the screw inside the grip. Straight slot screws are a pain because the driver usually slips out of the slot when you're trying to tighten. With these Phillips heads, you put the screw on the driver and slide it into the grip without it falling off. Much easier to insert. I realize this is probably a picayune problem for most of you, but the use of these screws worked out a minor frustration for me.

https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B000FN7X...buying_options
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  #5  
Old 04-27-2017, 05:24 PM
shovelstrokeed shovelstrokeed is offline
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Good, now throw away the Philips heads and get Torx. They are designed for assembly.
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  #6  
Old 04-27-2017, 05:46 PM
wormraper wormraper is offline
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Originally Posted by BHP View Post
This is my favorite grip screw for ARs. It is 1/4-28X1 and stainless steel. The head is large diameter which is much more supportive than the small heads on most socket head cap screws(Allens), and doesn't require a long Allen key to reach the screw inside the grip. Straight slot screws are a pain because the driver usually slips out of the slot when you're trying to tighten. With these Phillips heads, you put the screw on the driver and slide it into the grip without it falling off. Much easier to insert. I realize this is probably a picayune problem for most of you, but the use of these screws worked out a minor frustration for me.

https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B000FN7X...buying_options
I use a similar one. except it's one that has a phillips head AND a flat head style with a large head like that, meaning i can use either or.
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  #7  
Old 04-27-2017, 06:00 PM
BHP BHP is offline
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Originally Posted by shovelstrokeed View Post
Good, now throw away the Philips heads and get Torx. They are designed for assembly.
Nope, then I'd need a special Torx key. Phillips head screwdrivers are in everyone's tool box, Torx tools not so much. They are getting that way, though. Torx screws with SAE threads are not as commonly available, either. Too, the ones I could find had heads that were too small in diameter, just like most Allen head screws. With plastic grips, I like to spread the clamping force of the screw head over a relatively large area.

Last edited by BHP; 04-27-2017 at 06:08 PM.
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  #8  
Old 04-28-2017, 12:58 AM
dieseltech dieseltech is offline
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Mil spec is a 1/4X28-1" flat head screw.

Some manufactures such as Anderson which comes to mind do not fully drill and tap the receiver 1" hence the 3/4" screw.

The grip does not require much to keep it there so 3/4 is plenty and a allen head won't fall off as easy on the driver.

I build a lot of ARs for my own use because I like them and because I prefer original spec as it was originally designed, I will tap lowers out to the 1" if they are not and I use a flat head screw.
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  #9  
Old 04-28-2017, 01:53 AM
wormraper wormraper is offline
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Originally Posted by dieseltech View Post
Mil spec is a 1/4X28-1" flat head screw.

Some manufactures such as Anderson which comes to mind do not fully drill and tap the receiver 1" hence the 3/4" screw.

The grip does not require much to keep it there so 3/4 is plenty and a allen head won't fall off as easy on the driver.

I build a lot of ARs for my own use because I like them and because I prefer original spec as it was originally designed, I will tap lowers out to the 1" if they are not and I use a flat head screw.
I had heard that about Anderson receivers, but all 4 builds I did with them this year all had the hole tapped out fully and a 1 inch fit in with room to spare... from what I gathered it looks like SOME of Anderson's slipped out that way a few years back, but they're usually able to fit a 1 inch

Last edited by wormraper; 04-28-2017 at 02:12 AM.
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  #10  
Old 04-28-2017, 12:52 PM
dieseltech dieseltech is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wormraper View Post
I had heard that about Anderson receivers, but all 4 builds I did with them this year all had the hole tapped out fully and a 1 inch fit in with room to spare... from what I gathered it looks like SOME of Anderson's slipped out that way a few years back, but they're usually able to fit a 1 inch
I got one last month from them had a 3/4"
I think it's a matter of quality control catching it or like cars was it built on Monday morning or Friday afternoon. I did buy a blemished lower though maybe that was the blemish.
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  #11  
Old 04-28-2017, 01:03 PM
BHP BHP is offline
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Heck, if you get a receiver with a short tapped hole, just run a tap through it from the bottom and finish it off so you can use a 1" screw. No big deal. A 1/4-28 tap is a standard size, so they're easy to get and dirt cheap.

Last edited by BHP; 04-28-2017 at 01:28 PM.
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  #12  
Old 04-28-2017, 01:10 PM
LastRites LastRites is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BHP View Post
Heck, if you get a receiver with a short tapped hole, just run a tap through it from the bottom and finish it off so you can use a 1" screw. No big deal. A 1/4-28 tap is a standard size, so they're easy to get an dirt cheap.
I've run a tap through a couple of Andersons and PSA's, as quoted not really a big deal at all.
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  #13  
Old 04-28-2017, 02:19 PM
Sgt. Y Sgt. Y is offline
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Anderson lowers do not tap their grip threads all the way and reqire the 3/4" long screw.
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  #14  
Old 04-28-2017, 05:18 PM
wormraper wormraper is offline
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Originally Posted by Sgt. Y View Post
Anderson lowers do not tap their grip threads all the way and reqire the 3/4" long screw.
true, but not always. all 5 I bought were tapped for 1 inch and room to spare (actually could have fit 1 and 1/4)
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  #15  
Old 04-29-2017, 07:22 AM
LastRites LastRites is offline
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Whether they are tapped partial or all the way likely depends from which company they receive their lowers from as I've noticed the same with other low priced offering from different retailers.
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  #16  
Old 04-29-2017, 06:36 PM
wormraper wormraper is offline
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Originally Posted by LastRites View Post
Whether they are tapped partial or all the way likely depends from which company they receive their lowers from as I've noticed the same with other low priced offering from different retailers.
makes sense if they're sourcing from a couple different places. I probably just got lucky with the ones I bought. I have a handful of 3/4 inch screws and 1 inch screws since they're only $0.30 at Ace so I'm covered if I get an un fully tapped one next time
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  #17  
Old 05-02-2017, 12:17 PM
madcratebuilder madcratebuilder is offline
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I recall taping 1 or 2 Anderson lowers but most are GTG. I use a 1" screw that is drilled and tapped for a set screw to control trigger travel.
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  #18  
Old 05-02-2017, 01:33 PM
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dsk dsk is offline
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Originally Posted by wormraper View Post
also out of curiosity, how many times can you screw and unscrew that screw into the aluminum receiver before theads on the receiver are compromised. I did one gun about 6 or 7 times total since it was my first build and was trying out a handful of grips to see how I liked them. Just don't want to screw up the receiver of all things (it's not like I cross thread, or over torque, nothing is every not hand tightened except for one time I cranked a bit harder than I usually do)
As long as you aren't over-tightening them you should be able to do it over and over. Make sure to use a star-shaped lock washer always so you don't have to worry about it coming loose. Also use a drop of blue LocTite on the threads.
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Old 05-02-2017, 05:19 PM
BHP BHP is offline
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Originally Posted by dsk View Post
As long as you aren't over-tightening them you should be able to do it over and over. Make sure to use a star-shaped lock washer always so you don't have to worry about it coming loose. Also use a drop of blue LocTite on the threads.
The pink/purple small screw LocTite might be better if you don't want to have a fight on your hands to get the screw out. I've never seen the need for any thread locker with this particular screw, especially if you're using a good star washer. Any grip screw other than Allen/Torx head versions could be a real bear to remove with blue LocTite holding them.
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  #20  
Old 05-02-2017, 06:02 PM
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dsk dsk is offline
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You're probably right, but I never seem to find the purple LocTite for sale anywhere. All the auto parts stores seem to carry only the blue, red or green LocTite. That's why I said just "one drop" of the blue. If you lather the threads yeah you might have fun trying to remove the screw later.
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Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1970 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.
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  #21  
Old 05-02-2017, 06:12 PM
BHP BHP is offline
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You're probably right, but I never seem to find the purple LocTite for sale anywhere.
Amazon or most any bearing supply company.
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  #22  
Old 05-02-2017, 09:26 PM
wormraper wormraper is offline
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Originally Posted by dsk View Post
As long as you aren't over-tightening them you should be able to do it over and over. Make sure to use a star-shaped lock washer always so you don't have to worry about it coming loose. Also use a drop of blue LocTite on the threads.
yup, lock washers are a must. the star ones are ok, but I tend to prefer the split ones as I've NEVER had those bad boys come loose, although honestly I'll grab whichever 1/4 lock washer style first meets the hand in my big bag of washers and bolts lol

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Last edited by wormraper; 05-02-2017 at 09:32 PM.
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  #23  
Old 05-02-2017, 09:27 PM
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Amazon or most any bearing supply company.
Yeah, but I'm one of those old duffs who has a hard time going online to buy things I should be able to find a couple miles down the street, especially little purchases.
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  #24  
Old 05-02-2017, 11:00 PM
BHP BHP is offline
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Yeah, but I'm one of those old duffs who has a hard time going online to buy things I should be able to find a couple miles down the street, especially little purchases.
Sometimes old dogs gotta learn new tricks to get what they want.
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