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  #1  
Old 02-20-2020, 09:59 PM
flechero flechero is online now
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how much force required to cycle a 550?

I was having a conversation with my PT today and mentioned I was able to start reloading again (had shoulder surgery a few months ago) and he was quizzing me on motions and how many lbs of fore were required to cycle the press and at what points in the range.

I wasn't able to quantify it in lbs at least on the spot. (I have an idea but wanted to see what others thought or if any had measured it before)

What do you think the downstroke with resizing requires in lbs of force... and again at the top of the upstroke to seat primers? Sounded like a jmorris question to me!

I realize there are variables and lube /no lube, 9mm v 45acp, etc.

What do you guys think?
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  #2  
Old 02-20-2020, 10:30 PM
july19 july19 is online now
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Using lube on the cases I would suspect that the upstroke to prime would require the most effort, maybe 10 - 12 lbs - just a WAG. I don’t know what you’re being treated for but you can’t cycle a press without flexing your wrist, elbow and shoulder so there will be stress on your entire arm.
You could make a contraption with a fish scale(yes, I see the pun)attached to the handle and the bench for upstrokes and the handle and the ceiling for downstrokes; or something else.
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  #3  
Old 02-20-2020, 11:40 PM
megafiddle megafiddle is online now
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You would need to use a fish scale very much like a trigger pull gauge, one end attached to the handle, and pulling on the other end.

But the fish scale would be the simplest and most accurate way to measure it.

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  #4  
Old 02-21-2020, 05:24 AM
Rwehavinfunyet Rwehavinfunyet is offline
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How many lbs. of force on a D550?

I don't have the answer, but if pulling the handle to resize a case is the main issue, I would think about making a longer D550 handle to get better leverage….

I recently had the lower crank crack on my D550 press, which I have been using for over 30+ years! Dillon sent me the necessary parts and the two control arms are longer than my original D550.....once I took the press apart and fitted the new parts, I also had to adjust my dies for each tool head….and I have 8 tool heads with dies..... I believe the longer control arms makes a smoother and lighter pull for resizing....or maybe I am hoping it does...? However, I mainly use my D550 for experimenting with making new loads, and my high volume reloading is done on my D1050.....
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Old 02-21-2020, 07:23 AM
flechero flechero is online now
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I had a sub scap tear, a torn labrum (slap tear) and tore biceps out of shoulder, so that got relocated to the humerus from the shoulder and repaired the others. It's been a slow road back. The surgeon cleared me (he's a shooter with a little reloading exp) but this is the first time the PT and I discussed it in the context of rehab or exercise. He wanted some data to be sure I stayed in range of the rehab schedule/plan.

good idea on fish scales- I am going to check this weekend- I have a good set handhelds from past tournament fishing to use. I was thinking 15lbs pressure at the heaviest part of the downstroke and 10ish at primer seating. But I always give a little extra push at the end of the stroke to be sure it bottoms out... so maybe 5lbs more than that. Guessing though, which is why I asked.

Thanks guys
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Old 02-21-2020, 07:28 AM
DubfromGa DubfromGa is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flechero View Post
I had a sub scap tear, a torn labrum (slap tear) and tore biceps out of shoulder, so that got relocated to the humerus from the shoulder and repaired the others. It's been a slow road back. The surgeon cleared me (he's a shooter with a little reloading exp) but this is the first time the PT and I discussed it in the context of rehab or exercise. He wanted some data to be sure I stayed in range of the rehab schedule/plan.

good idea on fish scales- I am going to check this weekend- I have a good set handhelds from past tournament fishing to use. I was thinking 15lbs pressure at the heaviest part of the downstroke and 10ish at primer seating. But I always give a little extra push at the end of the stroke to be sure it bottoms out... so maybe 5lbs more than that. Guessing though, which is why I asked.

Thanks guys

I wouldn't be able to offer an educated guess.....just wanted to say congrats on getting the repairs done and best wishes on mending fully. Pretty awesome that you are wanting to get rolling on the Dillon.
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  #7  
Old 02-21-2020, 07:45 AM
jmorris jmorris is offline
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As you noted, it depends on the brass, dies and lube.

On he 550 a 458 socom case, using imperial with a steel die, 27 lbs of force is required to size, 23 lbs to remove the case from the die.
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Old 02-21-2020, 08:10 AM
jjfitch jjfitch is online now
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Why not start by just cycling the 550 without cases? See how this feels and do this for awhile, then graduate to straight wall cases like 38 special, 45 ACP, 9mm before bottle neck rifle. If you don't have 38 SPL dies or cases I could send you some for the cause!

I've gone through several shoulder issues. The key is to start slow, don't over do it and be patient. It could replace going to PT!

All the best,
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Last edited by jjfitch; 02-21-2020 at 08:13 AM.
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  #9  
Old 02-21-2020, 08:46 AM
flechero flechero is online now
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Thanks for the advice and concerns!

Surgery was 4ish months ago, so I'm almost 2 months into rehab and doing pretty well. I actually did some mobility exercise on the press when I first come out of the sling.

I'm to the point that I can load safely- it's just a matter of endurance. I initially had to load by levering with my left hand which was very slow and cumbersome on the 550. But I'm right handing it now! Just trying to establish reasonable limits/expectations for myself through the help of my PT.
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Old 02-21-2020, 08:46 AM
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Rifter Rifter is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flechero View Post
I was having a conversation with my PT today and mentioned I was able to start reloading again (had shoulder surgery a few months ago) and he was quizzing me on motions and how many lbs of fore were required to cycle the press and at what points in the range.

I wasn't able to quantify it in lbs at least on the spot. (I have an idea but wanted to see what others thought or if any had measured it before)

What do you think the downstroke with resizing requires in lbs of force... and again at the top of the upstroke to seat primers? Sounded like a jmorris question to me!

I realize there are variables and lube /no lube, 9mm v 45acp, etc.

What do you guys think?
It isn't the actual force as much as it is the repetitive nature of how it is applied. Carpal tunnel, tennis elbow, and other similar type injuries are caused by repetitive motion. Genetically, the body still thinks its living on the African steppes 20 million years ago when we didn't have to worry about such things.

So, stuff like ergonomic handles, lubed cases, proper mounting height, etc., are all your friends when it comes to removing stress on the joints. Proceed accordingly.
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  #11  
Old 02-21-2020, 09:32 AM
1911-9mm 1911-9mm is online now
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Call Dillon !!!

Call Dillon. They should have that data on file and can give you a better answer than what anyone could....
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  #12  
Old 02-21-2020, 07:09 PM
kp321 kp321 is offline
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I had a complete shoulder joint replacement 10 years ago, recovery is not fun! I blame the original problem partly to reloading. I loaded commercially for a number of years, highest volume was shot shells. My shoulder had in excess of 100,000 cycles during that time.
Since the surgery, I have paced myself at the loader. No shot shells at all and only 100 metallic shells in a session. I will load out 100 primers then do something else for an hour or so before coming back to the press.
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  #13  
Old 02-22-2020, 04:01 AM
VF-1 VF-1 is offline
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Everyone tells you, no need to lube your cases with carbid dies. I always squint my brass with a little Hornady One Shot lube. It makes my Dillon 550 run butter smooth. Any mechanical item that has less friction and requires less force, is bound to be a good thing! Best of luck on your recovery!
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  #14  
Old 02-23-2020, 05:08 AM
Rwehavinfunyet Rwehavinfunyet is offline
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Resizing cases on a progressive press....

I use carbide resizing dies and case lube on fired cases for every caliber I own, including rifle reloading, and this makes the amount of force required much easier and helps to mitigate case stretching of the case neck on most rifle brass when using a carbide die with a tight neck sizer.....
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  #15  
Old 02-23-2020, 08:13 AM
JJM7288 JJM7288 is offline
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I highly recommend the Inline Fabrication roller lever. It will save you a lot of shoulder pain and fatigue.
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