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  #1  
Old 01-21-2020, 03:49 PM
Hank in Arkansa Hank in Arkansa is offline
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My Hornady Projector Progressive Press

Back in the 1980s (yeah, I'm old school!) I bought a new Hornady Projector Progressive press. I also bought shell plates for several pistol calibers and a couple rifle cals. After many thousands of rounds, it recently broke. A small roll pin at the bottom of the rotating axle broke. Hornady sent me replacements, and in short order I fixed the press. Just finished loading 100 rounds of 9mm: all is well. Hornady did mention that the press is now obsolete and they no longer stock many replacement parts. Sad but time marches on.

If you're shopping for a progressive, you probably know they're not cheap. If you happen to find an original used Projector on Ebay, pawnshop, estate sale, etc., for a bargain price, give it a serious look. After all, mine is about 35 years old and still going strong. What's a decent price? Anything under $200 is worth considering, particularly with shell plates and in good shape. Just make sure the progressive mechanism is working.

I've altered mine a bit, and I recommend doing the same to a new owner. First, ditch the old style priming system. I never prime anything on a full size press. I have dedicated priming tools and use them. Next, ditch the shell "kicker" that kicks out a completed round. On the old model, it's flimsy sheet metal and will hang up, get bent and mess up your work; fingers work better. I'm still using the original Hornady powder measure system, but had to beef up the return spring to be more positive. So now I place a cleaned, primed empty case in station 1, carbide size without a decapping pin, flair on station 2, charge w powder on 3, seat on 4, taper crimp on 5, and remove the completed round from 1, then repeat. A case activated powder drop would be good, but my dispenser is working just fine. For each round, I must place an empty case, a bullet and remove a completed round by hand. Pulling the press handle does the rest. Easy.

I'm an NRA reloading instructor, and have been rolling my own since the late 1960s. I also have two single stage presses, and wouldn't be without at least one. But a progressive for 9mm, 45 ACP, .38/.357, etc is hard to beat. For most rifle rounds, I favor the single stage for more precision but less speed. If you're in the market for a progressive, but have a thin wallet, check out a clean, less expensive old style Hornady Projector. And Hornady has the complete user manual on their website for download.
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  #2  
Old 01-21-2020, 09:46 PM
jjfitch jjfitch is online now
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Me too!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hank in Arkansa View Post
Back in the 1980s (yeah, I'm old school!) I bought a new Hornady Projector Progressive press. I also bought shell plates for several pistol calibers and a couple rifle cals. After many thousands of rounds, it recently broke. A small roll pin at the bottom of the rotating axle broke. Hornady sent me replacements, and in short order I fixed the press. Just finished loading 100 rounds of 9mm: all is well. Hornady did mention that the press is now obsolete and they no longer stock many replacement parts. Sad but time marches on.

If you're shopping for a progressive, you probably know they're not cheap. If you happen to find an original used Projector on Ebay, pawnshop, estate sale, etc., for a bargain price, give it a serious look. After all, mine is about 35 years old and still going strong. What's a decent price? Anything under $200 is worth considering, particularly with shell plates and in good shape. Just make sure the progressive mechanism is working.

I've altered mine a bit, and I recommend doing the same to a new owner. First, ditch the old style priming system. I never prime anything on a full size press. I have dedicated priming tools and use them. Next, ditch the shell "kicker" that kicks out a completed round. On the old model, it's flimsy sheet metal and will hang up, get bent and mess up your work; fingers work better. I'm still using the original Hornady powder measure system, but had to beef up the return spring to be more positive. So now I place a cleaned, primed empty case in station 1, carbide size without a decapping pin, flair on station 2, charge w powder on 3, seat on 4, taper crimp on 5, and remove the completed round from 1, then repeat. A case activated powder drop would be good, but my dispenser is working just fine. For each round, I must place an empty case, a bullet and remove a completed round by hand. Pulling the press handle does the rest. Easy.

I'm an NRA reloading instructor, and have been rolling my own since the late 1960s. I also have two single stage presses, and wouldn't be without at least one. But a progressive for 9mm, 45 ACP, .38/.357, etc is hard to beat. For most rifle rounds, I favor the single stage for more precision but less speed. If you're in the market for a progressive, but have a thin wallet, check out a clean, less expensive old style Hornady Projector. And Hornady has the complete user manual on their website for download.
I'm also in the Hornady Progressive camp but I didn't know they no longer support it! Mine is virtually as received in the 80's too, however I've also added an extra spring to the powder measure lever. Mine is a dedicated 38Super.

Full disclosure: I started reloading around 1965 too and I'm also an NRA Certified Reloading Instructor along with 5 other Certs.

For rifle I also use 2 RCBS Rock Chuckers, for 45ACP, 9mm and 38Spl I have dedicated Dillon Progressives. I like to keep thing simple that way and not have to change things!

All the best in 2020,
__________________
John, Retired LEO, CA POST Certified Firearms Instructor, NRA Endmt., NRA Instructor, NRA RSO, Blue Lives Matter
Gun Control: Acquire target, align sights, press trigger, only after you have identified your target and what is beyond it and made the decision to shoot!
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  #3  
Old 01-22-2020, 03:43 AM
Rwehavinfunyet Rwehavinfunyet is online now
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Progressive presses.....

A progressive reloading press is designed to help a reloader save time.....from the OP's post:

Quote:
First, ditch the old style priming system. I never prime anything on a full size press. I have dedicated priming tools and use them. Next, ditch the shell "kicker" that kicks out a completed round. On the old model, it's flimsy sheet metal and will hang up, get bent and mess up your work; fingers work better.
IMHO, a progressive press is not worthwhile if you have to prime the cases as an extra step using dedicated priming tools....

I shoot about 12K-15K rounds of handgun ammo per year, so I don't want to spend time reloading....I would rather spend time shooting. I purchased a Dillon RL-1050 sometime in the early 1990's, and sold several guns to be able to get their progressive machine. It was worth it! Although it is not the newer Dillon Super 1050, it has still been working flawlessly for over 25+ years, and still makes excellent ammo! I have an old Dillon Blue press dated Jan. 1995, and the RL-1050 retailed back then for $1,079.95, while the D650 with the case feeder sold for $398.95! I'm glad I purchased my RL-1050 when I did, and once my press is set with primers, brass in the case feeder, and bullets in the tray, I can make 100 rounds in roughly 8 minutes!

When I began competing in USPSA, I was spending a great deal more time shooting, and for several years shot roughly 20K rounds of hot .38 super ammo.....this took a toll on my arms, and I developed tendonitis in both elbows, and had to curtail my shooting for about 6-7 months until they healed.... I started shooting less rounds, and switched to making ammo with heavier bullets and softer recoil.....and it helped....I had been shooting hot .38 super loads with 115 gr. bullets at roughly 1,500 fps from the muzzle, which helped make he compensator very effective in reducing muzzle jump.....but it did produce sharp recoil. Fortunately, USPSA eventually lowered the Power Factor to 165, I started using 125 gr jacketed bullets, and the muzzle velocity of my reloads was around 1340fps, which made major power factor, and had less sharp recoil..... I have never had a problem with my elbows since......

Last edited by Rwehavinfunyet; 01-22-2020 at 03:55 AM.
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  #4  
Old 01-22-2020, 08:28 AM
jmorris jmorris is offline
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You can trade them in +$200 and they will send you an LNL AP. $10 ea and they will modify Pro-jector shell plates to work on the AP as well.
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  #5  
Old 01-22-2020, 10:43 AM
Hank in Arkansa Hank in Arkansa is offline
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When I ordered some roll pins from Hornady, they did mention a trade in program to upgrade to their newer progressive, but didn't have specifics at hand. For my purposes, I still wanted to see if I could get my old press back on line, and succeeded. I like fixing things anyway.

Reloaders now have basically 3 price ranges to select from when shopping for a press. At the top end, and most expensive, are the latest progressives. Next step down are the latest crop of turret presses. Finally, the old tried and true single stage press is the most economical. New reloaders are always wise to start with a single stage press, in my opinion. Then you're only limited by the dollars you're willing to spend and the labor you want to avoid. Frankly, my old Projector fills a niche between a turret and a newer true progressive, like a Dillon. A little more labor for a considerable cost saving. As for priming, I will continue to deprime, clean and reprime large batches of cases (in all 25+ cartridges I load for) with one of my dedicated priming tools. For pistols, I use the Frankfort Arsenal hand tool. For most rifles, I use an RCBS bench mounted "mini" priming press. Different strokes for different folks. By the way, when I first got into handloading, I used a $10 Lee Loader set, where you primed with a mallet! Man, was that exciting. Three primer detonations with my first box of cases in our apartment! My new bride said find another way, or go outside. Respect the primer!

These threads can go on forever, but I'm out now. Happy handloading to all.
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  #6  
Old 01-22-2020, 10:59 AM
TRSOtto TRSOtto is offline
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Count me in the "prime on the upstroke" camp. There's absolutely no benefit in priming offline. A guaranteed time waster for me.
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  #7  
Old 01-22-2020, 12:39 PM
jjfitch jjfitch is online now
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Check trade in price increase...

Quote:
Originally Posted by jmorris View Post
You can trade them in +$200 and they will send you an LNL AP. $10 ea and they will modify Pro-jector shell plates to work on the AP as well.
I didn't know about the trade in program and called today to confirm the details.

The current trade in with your Hornady powder measure is $300. You receive a new LNL and new powder measure. If you keep your Powder measure add $50!The cost to modify the shell plates is still $10 each.

When you call they will ask for the serial number and what you will be sending in ie. P/M and shell plates. You then send payment and that starts the turn around!

I'll report back as to how it goes as soon as my "finance chairman" approves the expense!

All the best in 2020,
__________________
John, Retired LEO, CA POST Certified Firearms Instructor, NRA Endmt., NRA Instructor, NRA RSO, Blue Lives Matter
Gun Control: Acquire target, align sights, press trigger, only after you have identified your target and what is beyond it and made the decision to shoot!
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  #8  
Old 01-22-2020, 02:11 PM
TRSOtto TRSOtto is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jjfitch View Post
I didn't know about the trade in program and called today to confirm the details.

The current trade in with your Hornady powder measure is $300. You receive a new LNL and new powder measure. If you keep your Powder measure add $50!The cost to modify the shell plates is still $10 each.

When you call they will ask for the serial number and what you will be sending in ie. P/M and shell plates. You then send payment and that starts the turn around!

I'll report back as to how it goes as soon as my "finance chairman" approves the expense!

All the best in 2020,
That is one hell of a trade in offer!!!
Imagine a car dealership giving you 60% of the cost of a new car as your trade in !!!!
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  #9  
Old 01-22-2020, 09:12 PM
Gman45acp Gman45acp is offline
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If you have to prime cases off the press then you do not have a progressive press, it is semi progressive, or almost progressive, or progressiveish ( made that word up)
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  #10  
Old 01-23-2020, 08:06 AM
jmorris jmorris is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jjfitch View Post
The current trade in with your Hornady powder measure is $300. You receive a new LNL and new powder measure. If you keep your Powder measure add $50!The cost to modify the shell plates is still $10 each.
Well, I guess that’s like them cutting back on their giveaways.

Not such a great deal these days.

I bet you could just buy a new LNL AP

https://www.midsouthshooterssupply.c...gressive-press

And sell the projector and make out better. Surly it’s worth more than $100 as a functional progressive, today. $50 if you want to keep the measure.

Last edited by jmorris; 01-23-2020 at 08:09 AM.
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  #11  
Old 01-25-2020, 10:05 AM
Capt. Methane Capt. Methane is offline
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Hornady has made some fine equipment and while I don't have one of their presses if I didn't have a Dillon 550 and a Bonaza single stage, Hornady would be a top contender and what I have from them is very good.

If you dig out your calipers you can likely replace many small parts (like roll pins) from local parts/hardware stores by taking a few quick measurements and keep the older presses up and running...
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  #12  
Old 01-28-2020, 03:32 PM
blindshooter blindshooter is online now
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I had two, sent one in to Hornady + 250.00 (kept the measure) for a LNL. Almost wish I'd kept the Projector. The particular LnL I got was a mess at first, kept fooling with it and finally got it to work pretty good. The shim mod was the real fix. The rest was just tweeking here and there.
The remaining Projector works like a champ including priming. I take care of the priming parts as I know I'll not get anymore replacements. You can make another primer cam, longer with a steeper angle that will slow down the movement of the primer arm. That mod made priming much more reliable. The old primer feed design seems to be much more tolerant of errant tumbler media and spent primer residue than the LnL slide system. If I ever bugger up the priming parts I'll just keep the press and prep brass on it.
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  #13  
Old 01-28-2020, 03:46 PM
Hairtrigger Hairtrigger is offline
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I bought my Hornady Projector press about the same time as you
I have no issues using the stock priming on the press
I just trashed my case ejector and have not found a replacement, like you I pull loaded shells out by hand
I like the factory drum powder measuring style much better than the sliding bar
Glad to hear I am not the only old school progressive reloader
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  #14  
Old 01-28-2020, 09:45 PM
jmorris jmorris is offline
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https://forums.sassnet.com/index.php...t-up-for-sale/
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  #15  
Old 01-29-2020, 07:08 AM
Rwehavinfunyet Rwehavinfunyet is online now
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Progressive press and priming "on the upstroke?"

Quote:
Count me in the "prime on the upstroke" camp.
I have a much older designed Star progressive press with a Hulme case feeder dedicated for only reloading .45acp ammo, , and a Dillon RL-1050, and both seat the primer on the down stroke..... I also have a D-550 but once the ram handle is moved upward to resize, drop the powder, seat the bullet, and taper crimp the cartridge, then when the ram moves all the way down, the handle needs to be bumped forward to seat the primer....then the shell plate is moved manually (I use my left hand thumb) to be able to insert the next empty cartridge into the shell plate.....

What progressive press primes on the upstroke??

Last edited by Rwehavinfunyet; 01-29-2020 at 07:15 AM.
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  #16  
Old 01-29-2020, 07:55 AM
jmorris jmorris is offline
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The confusion comes from how they operate, what press you are talking about and if you are referring to the ram or the handle as they don’t always move in the same direction nor do they always move in the opposite direction.

Quote:
. I also have a D-550 but once the ram handle is moved upward to resize, drop the powder, seat the bullet...
To raise the ram to perform the operations in the tool head the handle has to go down, on the 550.

On the 1050’s the shell plate platform doesn’t move at all the tool head moves up as the handle goes up and down when the handle goes down, everything except indexing happens when both go down.

Most other presses, have the handle going down as the shell plate moves up and priming occurs at the top of the handle upstroke, that would be ram down stroke.

With the exception of the Lee load master that primes on the handle down stroke, that is ram upstroke as well.

Last edited by jmorris; 01-29-2020 at 08:02 AM.
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  #17  
Old 01-31-2020, 01:53 PM
shootz shootz is offline
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I have my buddy's Pro7 progressive. Sound like it's the same as the Projector.
It also has case kicker problems and and indexing problems. My buddy used it for many years loading 38 wadcutters. He moved all his stuff to my place and we used the press for a few more years. I remember he said he bought it because he never heard of Dillon .

It got to the point that it was not worth the time to adjust and fix the problems.
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  #18  
Old 02-02-2020, 07:24 PM
jjfitch jjfitch is online now
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Arghh!

Quote:
Originally Posted by jmorris View Post
Well, I guess that’s like them cutting back on their giveaways.

Not such a great deal these days.

I bet you could just buy a new LNL AP

https://www.midsouthshooterssupply.c...gressive-press

And sell the projector and make out better. Surly it’s worth more than $100 as a functional progressive, today. $50 if you want to keep the measure.
I did a little comparison $$ math! For me it made sense to just order a new one. Not that I needed another press but it will become a dedicated .223 press. The 500 bullet offer works too!

The "AP" will remain in service dedicated to 38 super!

What modification has to be done to the old style shell plates to work on the new LnL? Thanks....

So much for downsizing!

All the best,
__________________
John, Retired LEO, CA POST Certified Firearms Instructor, NRA Endmt., NRA Instructor, NRA RSO, Blue Lives Matter
Gun Control: Acquire target, align sights, press trigger, only after you have identified your target and what is beyond it and made the decision to shoot!
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  #19  
Old 02-08-2020, 09:06 AM
Jayhawkhuntclub Jayhawkhuntclub is offline
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Changing priming tubes, loading priming tubes and fixing problems if something goes wrong. I find it easier and hassle free to prime separately. It might take a bit more time, but I'm okay with that. And I can get better control over seating depth. There are definitely advantages to priming separately. But to each his own.
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  #20  
Old 02-15-2020, 07:24 PM
liggett liggett is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rwehavinfunyet View Post
A progressive reloading press is designed to help a reloader save time.....from the OP's post:



IMHO, a progressive press is not worthwhile if you have to prime the cases as an extra step using dedicated priming tools....

I shoot about 12K-15K rounds of handgun ammo per year, so I don't want to spend time reloading....I would rather spend time shooting. I purchased a Dillon RL-1050 sometime in the early 1990's, and sold several guns to be able to get their progressive machine. It was worth it! Although it is not the newer Dillon Super 1050, it has still been working flawlessly for over 25+ years, and still makes excellent ammo! I have an old Dillon Blue press dated Jan. 1995, and the RL-1050 retailed back then for $1,079.95, while the D650 with the case feeder sold for $398.95! I'm glad I purchased my RL-1050 when I did, and once my press is set with primers, brass in the case feeder, and bullets in the tray, I can make 100 rounds in roughly 8 minutes!

When I began competing in USPSA, I was spending a great deal more time shooting, and for several years shot roughly 20K rounds of hot .38 super ammo.....this took a toll on my arms, and I developed tendonitis in both elbows, and had to curtail my shooting for about 6-7 months until they healed.... I started shooting less rounds, and switched to making ammo with heavier bullets and softer recoil.....and it helped....I had been shooting hot .38 super loads with 115 gr. bullets at roughly 1,500 fps from the muzzle, which helped make he compensator very effective in reducing muzzle jump.....but it did produce sharp recoil. Fortunately, USPSA eventually lowered the Power Factor to 165, I started using 125 gr jacketed bullets, and the muzzle velocity of my reloads was around 1340fps, which made major power factor, and had less sharp recoil..... I have never had a problem with my elbows since......
priming off the press is not needed at all on my L&L AP. I don't have a bullet feeder but I DO have a nifty case feeder 3-D printed by a friend for me.
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