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  #1  
Old 01-09-2020, 09:45 AM
TNIC TNIC is offline
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Series 80 Govt firing pin safety

I've been watching a lot of 1911/Govt model videos lately and I've seen a couple of Series 80 DCAs.

I'm curious as to whether one can simply remove the pin safety plunger and linkages and still run the gun. Remove the part that prevents the pin from moving?

Or maybe its been tried and worked or failed and I was too lazy to search for it.
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  #2  
Old 01-09-2020, 09:57 AM
havanajim havanajim is online now
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Yes, those parts can indeed be removed. However, you will need the conversion 'shim' (slot filler) to make sure nothing shifts out of place once the original parts (levers) are removed.

https://www.brownells.com/handgun-pa...prod13121.aspx
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  #3  
Old 01-09-2020, 10:03 AM
TNIC TNIC is offline
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Ah ok, I see. I don't have an 80 or plan to get one, was just curious about it.

Thanks for the quick come back!
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  #4  
Old 01-09-2020, 02:51 PM
Pale Face Pale Face is offline
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If you're looking at older Series 80 pistols (c. Eighties and Nineties vintage) it might be worth doing to clean up the trigger pull but with late production guns -- certainly anything after 2010 -- the slide machining and safety components no longer interfere with good trigger action. The reason I bought my last series 80 (2012 production) was that the trigger was better than any other 1911 in the store, including the Series 70s. It has some other minor deficiencies, but the trigger quality is not one of them.
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  #5  
Old 01-09-2020, 04:14 PM
dakota1911 dakota1911 is online now
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Also worth a note is besides Colt, Remington, Para, Taurus, SIG, and probably others have used the Series 80 mechanical firing pin safety based off the trigger.

As close as I can come to apples to apples is with two of my Gold Cups, both made in 2015. One is a GCNM MkIV Series 70 with no mechanical firing pin safety and the other a GCT with the Series 80 mechanical firing pin safety. Now if I take out my Lyman digital trigger pull gauge the Series 80 breaks a little heavier but when I shoot them on the same day next to each other with the same ammo and the same way then I get the same size groups with both of them.

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  #6  
Old 01-09-2020, 08:05 PM
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The last Series 80 I purchased has a really light trigger on it... around 3.5# according to my Lyman trigger pull gauge. That's with the FPS parts still installed. Don't let anybody ever tell you that a S80 safety system ruins the trigger pull. Yes there are S80s out there with bad triggers, but it's because they have bad triggers.... not because they have FPS parts in them.
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  #7  
Old 01-09-2020, 11:17 PM
TNIC TNIC is offline
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Its true what they say, You never know until you ask.

Thanks to all for the great info! This old pooch can still learn a thing or three.

If a S80 ever crosses my path I won't be so hesitant. The standard GI A1 configuration is still my first love tho, being what I carried as a young (and clueless) PFC & Spec 4 Army MP.
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  #8  
Old 01-10-2020, 08:00 AM
JBnTX JBnTX is offline
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I'd leave the series 80 parts in the gun.

If you blindfolded someone and put a (stock out of the box) series 80 Colt in one hand and a series 70 Colt in the other, there's no way they could even tell the difference.

Just ignore the series 80 parts and keep shooting.
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  #9  
Old 01-10-2020, 08:04 AM
Pale Face Pale Face is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TNIC View Post
Its true what they say, You never know until you ask.

Thanks to all for the great info! This old pooch can still learn a thing or three.

If a S80 ever crosses my path I won't be so hesitant. The standard GI A1 configuration is still my first love tho, being what I carried as a young (and clueless) PFC & Spec 4 Army MP.

I wasn't in the Army but a WWI-issue Colt was the first pistol I ever fired. I preferred the feel of it to my first Series 80, so I replaced the arched, polymer mainspring housing with a straight mainspring housing with a lanyard loop and had the whole pistol, including barrel and hammer, refinished from the original Indifferent Blue to a satin nitrocarburized finish. The photo does not do the gunsmith's work justice, but it looks both more business-like and more attractive than it originally did.
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  #10  
Old 01-10-2020, 08:07 AM
Pale Face Pale Face is offline
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Originally Posted by JBnTX View Post
I'd leave the series 80 parts in the gun.

If you blindfolded someone and put a (stock out of the box) series 80 Colt in one hand and a series 70 Colt in the other, there's no way they could even tell the difference.

Just ignore the series 80 parts and keep shooting.
What JB said...
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  #11  
Old 01-10-2020, 08:17 AM
TNIC TNIC is offline
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That's a sweet piece of shootin arn PF!

Have no plans to get a S 80. I was only curious if it could be done.

I do want to find a '57 Govt and when the purse isn't quite so stressed (building a cash n carry house) I want to find a decent genuine 1911A1 to bring out on Memorial Days and July 4th clang n bangs.
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  #12  
Old 01-10-2020, 10:38 AM
Frank Vaccaro Frank Vaccaro is offline
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Wow Pale Face, thats beautiful.
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  #13  
Old 01-10-2020, 12:40 PM
mickeyd mickeyd is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JBnTX View Post
I'd leave the series 80 parts in the gun.

If you blindfolded someone and put a (stock out of the box) series 80 Colt in one hand and a series 70 Colt in the other, there's no way they could even tell the difference.

Just ignore the series 80 parts and keep shooting.

This ^^^^
The Series 80 configuration has been around now for 30+ years.
It works and works well. All the talk about an inferior trigger is BS.
Most would never know the difference.
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  #14  
Old 01-10-2020, 05:05 PM
fnfalman fnfalman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mickeyd View Post
This ^^^^
The Series 80 configuration has been around now for 30+ years.
It works and works well. All the talk about an inferior trigger is BS.
Most would never know the difference.
Different, yes. Inferior, no.

If I were to milk the takeup, I can feel the deactivation of the Series 80 firing pin safety but in actual shooting act itself? Nope. Can't feel the difference.
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  #15  
Old 01-10-2020, 05:12 PM
JBnTX JBnTX is offline
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Originally Posted by fnfalman View Post
Different, yes. Inferior, no.

If I were to milk the takeup, I can feel the deactivation of the Series 80 firing pin safety but in actual shooting act itself? Nope. Can't feel the difference.
Seriously. I'd like to see you tell the difference.
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  #16  
Old 01-10-2020, 05:32 PM
Sandhills Write Sandhills Write is offline
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I have been working on 1911s since the mid to late 1960s, before and after doing a trigger job, I do not think anyone can tell the difference, I have done trigger jobs as light as 2-1/2 lbs for a competitive shooter, and on a series 80. He could not tell that the firing pin safety was there. On my 3-1/2 to 4 lb trigger pulls, you cannot feel it at all. The only thing is there are four more parts to contend with. I have taken the system out and used the parts from Brownells to replace it, and they work fine too.
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  #17  
Old 01-10-2020, 06:25 PM
fallenangelhim fallenangelhim is offline
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I’m an average shooter. I have owned Series 70 and Series 80. From Colt to Les Baer. I cannot tell a difference. If you are an expert shooter maybe you can but I am a defensive shooter and cannot.
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  #18  
Old 01-10-2020, 09:20 PM
dsf dsf is offline
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I remove the 80's FP blocks on my 1911s and use the spacer to fill the void. What I don't care for is that darned hole in the slide left by the vacated plunger. To remedy that I use a 70s series firing pin, remove the plunger spring and drop the plunger back in. The plunger simply rides the FP and doesn't interfere with function.
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  #19  
Old 01-11-2020, 09:32 AM
fnfalman fnfalman is offline
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Originally Posted by JBnTX View Post
Seriously. I'd like to see you tell the difference.
Seriously, I can tell the difference in the take up. But like I said before, it doesn’t affect shooting any. Nor does it make the Series 80 trigger pull inferior. Different means different. Not better or worse.
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  #20  
Old 01-11-2020, 10:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dsf View Post
I remove the 80's FP blocks on my 1911s and use the spacer to fill the void. What I don't care for is that darned hole in the slide left by the vacated plunger. To remedy that I use a 70s series firing pin, remove the plunger spring and drop the plunger back in. The plunger simply rides the FP and doesn't interfere with function.
For a range gun maybe, but I would be very leery of such a setup in a defense gun because you never know when that plunger is somehow going to end up getting jammed with the firing pin.

Honestly folks, if for some reason you really can't stand the Series 80 system Colt makes nearly every model in a "Series 70" format as well.
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Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1970 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.
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  #21  
Old 01-11-2020, 02:57 PM
hub1home hub1home is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JBnTX View Post
I'd leave the series 80 parts in the gun.

If you blindfolded someone and put a (stock out of the box) series 80 Colt in one hand and a series 70 Colt in the other, there's no way they could even tell the difference.

Just ignore the series 80 parts and keep shooting.
I totally agree with this! In fact, Gun Tests magazine did a test on the series 70 and the series 80 and the testers opinions were split 50/50. Also, I have a series 70 and a series 80 Gold Cup and I can't tell the difference.
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  #22  
Old 01-11-2020, 04:14 PM
1911Sooner 1911Sooner is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dsk View Post
For a range gun maybe, but I would be very leery of such a setup in a defense gun because you never know when that plunger is somehow going to end up getting jammed with the firing pin.

Honestly folks, if for some reason you really can't stand the Series 80 system Colt makes nearly every model in a "Series 70" format as well.
Link to Colt Defender 70 series please.
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  #23  
Old 01-11-2020, 04:27 PM
gc45 gc45 is offline
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Excellent thread! I learned something today.
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  #24  
Old 01-12-2020, 09:20 AM
imjb1911 imjb1911 is offline
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I have 1911s of both series. If I were blindfolded I couldn't tell the difference between them. I bought one of those shims and converted my R1 to series 70 and to me, there was no difference at all. I put it back to 80.
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  #25  
Old 01-12-2020, 10:51 AM
Texagun Texagun is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dsk View Post
The last Series 80 I purchased has a really light trigger on it... around 3.5# according to my Lyman trigger pull gauge. That's with the FPS parts still installed. Don't let anybody ever tell you that a S80 safety system ruins the trigger pull. Yes there are S80s out there with bad triggers, but it's because they have bad triggers.... not because they have FPS parts in them.
As usual, dsk hits the nail on the head. I have picked up several series 70 and series 80 guns over the years. Years ago I bought a package of 4 or 5 spacers from the guy who made them. I even talked to him over the phone about them. I had intended to install them in my series 80 guns but as it turned out, all of the series 80 guns I had already had decent triggers in them so I never got around to installing the shims in them. That package of FPS shims in shrink wrap still resides in my parts box somewhere.
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