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  #26  
Old 09-21-2019, 06:41 PM
John Joseph John Joseph is offline
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I've had three Huskys---all very good saws with the last being a 372 XP with a 28" bar (it found a home on a ranch in the mountains with plenty of Ponderosa pines) but I'm really happy with the Stihl 250---a lot easier on the ol' back for me.

Last edited by John Joseph; 09-21-2019 at 07:03 PM.
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  #27  
Old 09-22-2019, 01:10 PM
BBBBill BBBBill is offline
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Last year's Hurricane Michael dropped trees across our road in 4 places. Some of the tree falls covered 150 feet or more of the road. We were blocked in for over a week and without power for 11 days. Fortunately I had a generator, plenty of fuel, a 4 wheel drive to go overland/across fields/through the woods to get out to buy more fuel when/if needed, …. and a chain saw. It came in very handy. We had plenty of food and the generator kept the refrigerator and freezer running so we only lost a couple gallons of ice cream. I have steadily been revising/rebuilding my disaster plan and kit to fit our needs. An additional chain saw, tune up items, and spare parts are on the list.
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  #28  
Old 09-22-2019, 05:52 PM
STORM2 STORM2 is offline
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My Stihl failed to start today. First time in 15 years. It will be at the dealer/hospital tomorrow. I knew when it did not start ..... it was no going to start. It’ll be back on line by weeks end. I figure it deserves a spa day at the dealer, it has bailed out myself and many neighbors for a long time.
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  #29  
Old 09-22-2019, 10:39 PM
BBBBill BBBBill is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by STORM2 View Post
My Stihl failed to start today. First time in 15 years. It will be at the dealer/hospital tomorrow. I knew when it did not start ..... it was no going to start Ö
Yep. An often overlooked part of preparedness is doing regular maintenance on your tools that will be critical to your recovery effort. I have been negligent in the past. All part of my personal disaster plan checklist now. At my age I live by checklists. Part of that stems from my military background, the rest from my inability to concentrate (attraction to whatevershiny object that is currently within my view).
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  #30  
Old 09-23-2019, 11:30 AM
USMM guy USMM guy is offline
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Stay away from gas with Ethanol in it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by STORM2 View Post
My Stihl failed to start today. First time in 15 years. It will be at the dealer/hospital tomorrow. I knew when it did not start ..... it was no going to start. Itíll be back on line by weeks end. I figure it deserves a spa day at the dealer, it has bailed out myself and many neighbors for a long time.
More and more I have been going to using Tru Fuel synthetic fuel. It is expensive but worth it. And run your saw dry before putting it up for any length of time.
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  #31  
Old 09-23-2019, 04:36 PM
STORM2 STORM2 is offline
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Fortunately (or unfortunately) my saw is used more than monthly year round. The fuel is less than a week old and running in other Stihl tools. Running it dry is a good policy if you know it is going dormant for awhile. I have the luxury of a burn pile to dump mine if a project is finished....that just doesn’t seem to occur lately. I am trying something new. If you use a chainsaw case, you know it accumulates oil in the bottom. Instead of using old towels I am giving disposable diapers a try to line the case bottom when my saw comes back on line. Tune in later.
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  #32  
Old 09-23-2019, 06:23 PM
kwo51 kwo51 is offline
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Any of you guys use a chain breaking tool? If so what kind.
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  #33  
Old 09-23-2019, 07:00 PM
STORM2 STORM2 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kwo51 View Post
Any of you guys use a chain breaking tool? If so what kind.
My Stihl is a quick no tool chain swap model. I take the easy way out and carry spare chains. I’ll leave the chain maintenance to the shop. I’ll work on my guns but not my chainsaws. You gotta save something for the other guy.

Last edited by STORM2; 09-23-2019 at 07:06 PM.
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  #34  
Old 09-23-2019, 08:07 PM
USMM guy USMM guy is offline
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This gets my vote.

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Originally Posted by STORM2 View Post
My Stihl is a quick no tool chain swap model. I take the easy way out and carry spare chains. Iíll leave the chain maintenance to the shop. Iíll work on my guns but not my chainsaws. You gotta save something for the other guy.
I can and have sharpened my own chains. And I will continue to be set up to do so. But as time and age progress, I find myself more and more less inclined to do so. If I can pay the kid down at the store to do a good job sharpening a chain for me for five bucks. This is more often than not the way that I go.
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  #35  
Old 09-23-2019, 09:59 PM
John Joseph John Joseph is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by STORM2 View Post
My Stihl is a quick no tool chain swap model. I take the easy way out and carry spare chains. Iíll leave the chain maintenance to the shop. Iíll work on my guns but not my chainsaws. You gotta save something for the other guy.
The thing is, chains aren't cheap. How many spare chains can you budget for and what happens when they get dull and the shop is closed because of, you know, some disaster?
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  #36  
Old 09-24-2019, 01:02 AM
STORM2 STORM2 is offline
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I’ll run out of many more things before I run out of saws or chains.

Last edited by STORM2; 09-24-2019 at 01:07 AM.
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  #37  
Old 09-24-2019, 01:41 PM
USMM guy USMM guy is offline
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Me two

Quote:
Originally Posted by STORM2 View Post
Iíll run out of many more things before I run out of saws or chains.
The last time that I checked I had ten sharpened chains for the 362 on hand including several that are brand new. Six chains for the 310, And three for the pole saw. Plenty of fuel is always on hand as well as bar and chain oil.
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  #38  
Old 09-24-2019, 02:22 PM
PolymerMan PolymerMan is online now
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I have always had bad luck with chainsaws. Here in the subtropic part of the country we have tons of soft wood trees and shrubs like Brazilian peppers and ficus trees. The problem is they almost always clog the chain works. The pulp mixes with the bar oil and just makes it a mess. I often have to carry Allen keys, nut drivers and screw drivers with me when I am out clearing brush just to keep the saw going.

Anyone else have this problem? Solution?
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  #39  
Old 09-24-2019, 02:32 PM
BBBBill BBBBill is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Joseph View Post
The thing is, chains aren't cheap. How many spare chains can you budget for and what happens when they get dull and the shop is closed because of, you know, some disaster?
Well, if you are preparing for a disaster, especially one that may last for a while, you had better have some spares. A broken chain will leave you helpless regardless of the ability to sharpen. Nothing wrong with letting a shop do your sharpening if your time is better spent on other things. You can still have files (and guides if needed) to do it yourself when the disaster keeps you from getting to the shop.
Same goes for plugs ,filters, etc.
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  #40  
Old 09-24-2019, 02:32 PM
kwo51 kwo51 is offline
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Add a little kerosene to the oil. Chain stretch is my problem and shop will not re move a link.
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  #41  
Old 09-24-2019, 03:08 PM
USMM guy USMM guy is offline
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What benefit does the added Kerosene give you?

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Originally Posted by kwo51 View Post
Add a little kerosene to the oil. Chain stretch is my problem and shop will not re move a link.
The Stihl saws are adjustable for tension so chain stretch is not an issue for me.
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  #42  
Old 09-24-2019, 06:45 PM
1911_Kid 1911_Kid is offline
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Always good to have this accessory mounted and ready for use.

only $365 (https://doublestarusa.com/killsaw-chainsaw-bayonet.html)
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  #43  
Old 09-24-2019, 08:37 PM
L.E. L.E. is offline
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Sharpening a saw is no different than sharpening a knife. Learn how to do it by hand without the non-essential doodads, and you'll always have that skill. It's far from hard. A high-quality proper size round file, file handle, and a pair of gloves (or can of Band-Aids), and you are set. Pay attention to maintain the factory angle, count your strokes, same number on each tooth. Don't drag the file backwards, lift it and make the next forward pass. Tap the end of it on the bench briskly every so often. Replace it when it's worn out. After you've sharpened a chain multiple times, look at it closely. Are the teeth on the right longer than the ones on the left (or vice-versa)? Pretty easy to let happen, it's easier to bear down on one side, and the teeth get shorter. Pay more attention in the future, maintain the same pressure on each side. The saw won't cut straight if the teeth aren't the same length on the right and left side.
A smaller saw, like my MS260, can be sharpened in 5-10 minutes, longer bar, 15 minutes.
It's worth taking the time to learn how to do this yourself, it's not difficult at all. One thing I left out, if you have a bench vise handy, by all means, clamp the bar in it, makes everything twice as easy. If not, still not difficult at all.
L.
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  #44  
Old 09-24-2019, 09:18 PM
kwo51 kwo51 is offline
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Kerosene will cut the gum from some trees and the pitch from pines . Been feeding my family for years with a tree company I owned . I use cheap oil in oiler and used to use used oil when a lot was being used . Chains stretch and I only use non kick back chains . Not cheap .
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  #45  
Old 09-24-2019, 09:28 PM
John Joseph John Joseph is offline
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If you use a chain saw often enough, lots of spare chains go with the territory. This OP is geared for the suburbanite Griswold---one or two spares maybe all they have with other things having priority on the ol' the prepping budget.
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  #46  
Old 09-24-2019, 10:05 PM
Pedro 1 Pedro 1 is offline
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The only thing I would add to L.E.'s excellent post would be to file the rakers when needed.
Pedro.
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  #47  
Old 09-24-2019, 10:12 PM
L.E. L.E. is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pedro 1 View Post
The only thing I would add to L.E.'s excellent post would be to file the rakers when needed.
Pedro.
I glossed over that, Pedro, thanks.
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  #48  
Old 09-24-2019, 10:17 PM
L.E. L.E. is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kwo51 View Post
Kerosene will cut the gum from some trees and the pitch from pines . Been feeding my family for years with a tree company I owned . I use cheap oil in oiler and used to use used oil when a lot was being used . Chains stretch and I only use non kick back chains . Not cheap .
Bar oil is far better than regular oil or used oil. It has additives that are sticky, and resists being flung off the speeding chain.
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  #49  
Old 09-24-2019, 11:46 PM
USMM guy USMM guy is offline
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I do not cut a lot of pine trees.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kwo51 View Post
Kerosene will cut the gum from some trees and the pitch from pines . Been feeding my family for years with a tree company I owned . I use cheap oil in oiler and used to use used oil when a lot was being used . Chains stretch and I only use non kick back chains . Not cheap .
And gum is not an issue when I do. And if chain stretch is an issue for you. Then I would suggest that you upgrade to a saw that has adjustable tensioning.
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  #50  
Old 09-25-2019, 07:15 AM
L.E. L.E. is offline
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Originally Posted by USMM guy View Post
And gum is not an issue when I do. And if chain stretch is an issue for you. Then I would suggest that you upgrade to a saw that has adjustable tensioning.
I think they all have adjustable tensioning. And, all chains stretch. First, when they're new, and after that if the continue to stretch a lot they're worn out. This is exacerbated by running them hard, on tough tasks, usually when the oiling isn't doing it's job. Plugged up, or not working correctly. Heat builds up, hard on bar & chains both. Of course, there's also always the chance that your chain was just too long to begin with, in which case you'll just run out of adjustment as it stretches.
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