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  #1  
Old 12-18-2001, 11:05 PM
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Uncle Ethan Uncle Ethan is offline
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green/gray parkerizing in WWII 1911's




Howdy- I just signed up, I collect 1911's, and have read different ideas people have for how the WWII parkerizing achieved the gray/green color on some of them. I have parkerized several 1911's using iron filings as well as manganese powder. The result has always been dark gray. A friend of mine is building sniper rifles and would like to achieve the gray/green finish on the barrels and actions. Any information on processes would be greatly appreciated.
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  #2  
Old 12-19-2001, 07:39 AM
SAChamp SAChamp is offline
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Welcome to the forum!

Off the top of my head I recalled this thread:

[http://www.1911forum.com/forums/show...&threadid=1304

If you haven't already, you may also want to give the search feature a shot...
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  #3  
Old 12-19-2001, 09:37 AM
Jim V Jim V is offline
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Wasn't the color of the WWII arms the results of them being oiled, greased or coated with Cosmoline while in storage?
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Old 12-19-2001, 09:46 AM
Jim Watson Jim Watson is online now
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I have heard of the Cosmoline tint theory, too.

Just off the top of my head I recall that somewhere there is a spec for a zinc chromate dip after the phosphate treatment. Many chromium compounds are green, and might well be the source of the color.
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  #5  
Old 12-19-2001, 11:26 AM
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dsk dsk is offline
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The parkerizing color varied by manufactuer and production date. Early 1941-'42 parkerized Colts were a medium grey in color. By 1943 the hue had changed to the familiar grey-green. Late 1945 production was a Parko-Lubrite finish, similar to parkerizing but much smoother to the touch.

Early Remington Rands, ithaca, and all Union Switch & Signals were actually a Du-Lite blue. Later they were a dark charcoal grey, then near the end of their contract in 1945 Remington Rands were a light grey.

There are two basic types of parkerizing, manganeze and phospate. The WW2 guns were phosphate and the color could vary as described above.
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Try not to fall into the common trap of wanting to replace everything on your new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out, and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot it for at least 500 rounds, then decide what you don't like and want improved. Vintage 1911's should NEVER be refinished or modified because it ruins any value they had as a collectible firearm.
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  #6  
Old 12-19-2001, 02:43 PM
ChrisS ChrisS is offline
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Check these guys out. They sell parkerizing kits and have a "WW II Grey" type.

http://www.adventec.com
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  #7  
Old 12-21-2001, 11:33 PM
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dsk dsk is offline
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Alright alright, manganeze and ZINC phosphate. Funny, but I don't remember having a science teacher named Mr. Gahimer in school.
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Try not to fall into the common trap of wanting to replace everything on your new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out, and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot it for at least 500 rounds, then decide what you don't like and want improved. Vintage 1911's should NEVER be refinished or modified because it ruins any value they had as a collectible firearm.
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  #8  
Old 12-27-2001, 07:56 PM
STRIKEHOLDTROOPER STRIKEHOLDTROOPER is offline
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Check out shootersolutions.com. They have a green conversion kit for their parkerizing kits. Haven't tried it yet and they're all out for now but looks intresting. Anyone else heard of this or tried it?
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