1911Forum
Forum   Reviews   Rules   Legal   Site Supporters & Donations   Advertise


Go Back   1911Forum > General > General Gun Discussion


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 07-25-2004, 05:59 PM
kilr95ss kilr95ss is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Clanton, Alabama
Age: 43
Posts: 156
Proper Trigger Finger Placement




Since I bought my Dillon 550 I have been shooting alot more. Now I have the pistol dialed in with a load I have been trying different things. I learned quickly wrapping the trigger finger arouind the trigger is not good. My groups were all over the place. Went back to just using the pad of my finger and group went back to normal.

Just wanted to share.
__________________
Charles Spradley
When in doubt, gas it!
It will either fix the problem
or end the suspense!
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 07-25-2004, 07:32 PM
mmike87 mmike87 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Virginia
Posts: 491
I shoot better with the trigger 1 1/2 knuckles back from my finger tip. I have been told 'move it out towards the tip more and you'll shoot better."

I shot worse and went back to where it was. We're all different, I guess.
__________________
SIG P228, SIG P220 ST, SIG P239, SIG P232SL, SIG P226ST, SIG P229DAK
HK USP Tactical 45, Kimber Team Match II
Les Baer Super-Tac .45, CZ 75B Tactical, Wilson Professional, Various Evil Black Rifles
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 07-26-2004, 02:24 PM
Bob Brown Bob Brown is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Lakeside, CA, USA
Age: 84
Posts: 2,477
IF you're shooting for Bullseye precision, the 'pad' of your finger is the right place. Trigger length itself is also very important. Here's the test. Grip the pistol normally and put your finger on the trigger about halfway between the tip and the first crease (knuckle). With the pistol in front of you like you're holding someone up, raise your forearm up to point the muzzle at the ceiling. Look in a mirror to see if your finger is 90 degrees across the trigger shoe. If it isn't, the trigger is either too long or too short and for serious competition, should be changed to suit your hand/finger configuration.
If your finger is at 90 degrees, then the way to determine whether your finger position is correct is to dryfire the piece and see if the front sight deflects either right or left when the hammer falls. If it doesn't...great, but if it does, just move your finger a little, one way or the other, until that front sight stays still when the trigger stops its rearward motion. Your object is to accomplish a straight-to-the-rear trigger squeeze. Enough dryfiring and muscle memory will take over and you won't have to worry about it at the range.
Sorry I got so wordy here, but I figured you may as well have the whole picture.

Bob
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 07-26-2004, 04:03 PM
mmike87 mmike87 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Virginia
Posts: 491
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Brown
IF you're shooting for Bullseye precision, the 'pad' of your finger is the right place. Trigger length itself is also very important. Here's the test. Grip the pistol normally and put your finger on the trigger about halfway between the tip and the first crease (knuckle). With the pistol in front of you like you're holding someone up, raise your forearm up to point the muzzle at the ceiling. Look in a mirror to see if your finger is 90 degrees across the trigger shoe. If it isn't, the trigger is either too long or too short and for serious competition, should be changed to suit your hand/finger configuration.
If your finger is at 90 degrees, then the way to determine whether your finger position is correct is to dryfire the piece and see if the front sight deflects either right or left when the hammer falls. If it doesn't...great, but if it does, just move your finger a little, one way or the other, until that front sight stays still when the trigger stops its rearward motion. Your object is to accomplish a straight-to-the-rear trigger squeeze. Enough dryfiring and muscle memory will take over and you won't have to worry about it at the range.
Sorry I got so wordy here, but I figured you may as well have the whole picture.

Bob
Thanks for the tip. I'll give that a try and see what I come up with.
__________________
SIG P228, SIG P220 ST, SIG P239, SIG P232SL, SIG P226ST, SIG P229DAK
HK USP Tactical 45, Kimber Team Match II
Les Baer Super-Tac .45, CZ 75B Tactical, Wilson Professional, Various Evil Black Rifles
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 07-28-2004, 10:06 AM
sendtoscott sendtoscott is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 227
Quote:
Originally Posted by kilr95ss
Since I bought my Dillon 550 I have been shooting alot more. Now I have the pistol dialed in with a load I have been trying different things. I learned quickly wrapping the trigger finger arouind the trigger is not good. My groups were all over the place. Went back to just using the pad of my finger and group went back to normal.

Just wanted to share.
I tend to twist the gun when pulling the trigger w/ anything further in than the pad of my finger.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 07-28-2004, 08:36 PM
DougV DougV is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 147
I am a pad man myself. Just can't do it any other way.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 07-28-2004, 09:01 PM
DJL2 DJL2 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 99
Given my experience with DA pistols, I tend towards my first joint. It gives me better control. I do not like using the pad and find it difficult to do so. That whole muscle memory thing. I will try the suggested drill though, and see what I come up with.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 07-29-2004, 12:47 AM
Eyespy Eyespy is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Southern California
Posts: 140
This article recommends finger placement at the distal joint:

http://www.backwoodshome.com/articles2/ayoob85.html
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 07-29-2004, 11:31 AM
SoftRocker SoftRocker is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 95
"...dryfire the piece and see if the front sight deflects either right or left when the hammer falls."

IMO, I think this is a great method to find your individual finger "sweet spot".

While testing placement, however I purposefully jerk the trigger (not to establish a bad habit, but to minimize any unintentional lapse of technique)! I've found that with enough concentration I can perform a good pull from any finger position, but I think the best placement should require the least effort in this respect. Please don't confuse what I'm saying with trigger jerking "practice"; after you find your placement stick to it, and use good form.

For me, the spot is about 2/3 of the way from the tip to the first knuckle; I now have a little calaus there!
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 07-29-2004, 12:02 PM
master gunner master gunner is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Richmond VA
Age: 67
Posts: 8,736
Off the trigger
Sights on target
Clear with good backstop
On the trigger

Lets be safe out there.

__________________
1SG
The Friends of Elwood P. Dowd and Pooka preservation society
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 07-29-2004, 09:48 PM
Maj Tom Maj Tom is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Southern Middle TN
Posts: 935
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Brown
IF you're shooting for Bullseye precision, the 'pad' of your finger is the right place. Trigger length itself is also very important. Here's the test. Grip the pistol normally and put your finger on the trigger about halfway between the tip and the first crease (knuckle). With the pistol in front of you like you're holding someone up, raise your forearm up to point the muzzle at the ceiling. Look in a mirror to see if your finger is 90 degrees across the trigger shoe. If it isn't, the trigger is either too long or too short and for serious competition, should be changed to suit your hand/finger configuration.
If your finger is at 90 degrees, then the way to determine whether your finger position is correct is to dryfire the piece and see if the front sight deflects either right or left when the hammer falls. If it doesn't...great, but if it does, just move your finger a little, one way or the other, until that front sight stays still when the trigger stops its rearward motion. Your object is to accomplish a straight-to-the-rear trigger squeeze. Enough dryfiring and muscle memory will take over and you won't have to worry about it at the range.
Sorry I got so wordy here, but I figured you may as well have the whole picture.

Bob
Some things require more words than others.... Excellent response!
I have a very smooth tip on my triger finger almost directly in line with the middle of the nail.

Last edited by Maj Tom; 07-29-2004 at 09:51 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 07-30-2004, 09:56 AM
Doug 29 Doug 29 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Posts: 206
If I were shooting a gun with a trigger pull of 2 1/2 lbs., or less, then I would agree with the experts advice of using the tip of the finger. With a trigger pull of 3 1/2 - 5 lbs., I can control each ounce of pressure MORE PRECISELY by using the first joint of my trigger finger. Same reason that I can control a gun with a smaller grip, rather than one with a large grip. I also prefer the SHORT trigger on a 1911A1.

Last edited by Doug 29; 07-30-2004 at 09:58 AM.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:55 PM.


NOTICE TO USERS OF THIS SITE: By continuing to use this site, you certify that you have read and agree to abide by the Legal Terms of Use. All information, data, text or other materials ("Content") posted to this site by any users are the sole responsibility of those users. 1911Forum does not guarantee the accuracy, integrity, or quality of such Content.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 2011 1911Forum.com, LLC. All Rights Reserved