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  #1  
Old 07-31-2003, 03:02 PM
aclundwall aclundwall is offline
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installing a new ejector




As I understand it, the forward post of the ejector has a semi-circular notch in the front that allows the cross pin to lock the ejector in place. However, none of the new ejectors I've seen have this notch. I'm guessing that is so that it can be located to match the frame, thereby insuring the best fit.

So, how is one supposed to locate and then cut this notch?

I think I'm missing something....

Art
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  #2  
Old 07-31-2003, 05:58 PM
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CCV CCV is offline
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Here's how I did it:

Put the ejector in the pistol.

Install a punch or other tool into the pin hole and "mark" the leg of the ejector.

Remove the ejector and locate the mark made by the punch/tool.

CAREFULLY (and slowly) remove metal from the "leg" of the ejector (I used a needle file but a Dremel would be faster). Put the ejector back in the pistol and try to install the pin. Repeat until the pin can be installed into the frame.

Go slow and don't remove more metal than is necessary for pin clearance.
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  #3  
Old 07-31-2003, 06:27 PM
Jim V Jim V is offline
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What CCV said, do not attempt to be tricky and drill the notch using the frame as a drill jig. Bad things tend to happen when you do that. Like drills wandering and then you have a frame with a hole where one is not needed that is filled with a broken drill bit that you can not remove.

Not a pretty picture.

Oh yes, when removing the old ejector, be sure you don't break off one of the legs. It is not that hard to do and if you do, your porblems have just started.

What I did when I replaced an ejector was clamp the ejector in a vise and then carefully worked the pistol off the legs.

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Last edited by Jim V; 07-31-2003 at 06:30 PM.
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  #4  
Old 08-01-2003, 01:00 AM
TGR TGR is offline
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I have found that using files on those hardened ejectors is difficult. The best most accurate method I have found to cut the leg to accept the pin is to use a dremel. After the pin location is marked take a cut off wheel in a dremel and slightly remove the edges on a scrap piece of metal. Then use the cut off wheel to cut the ejector leg. The wheel cuts just about a perfect sized cut and the dremel is easy to control. Anyway that is the best method Iíve come up with but I am always open to suggestions...........
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  #5  
Old 08-01-2003, 05:37 AM
jim2 jim2 is offline
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Small world...John Harrison (gunsmith, Precision Gun Works) and I were discussing this issue yesterday, and he also strongly recommends against going the drill route, but rather recommends, as discussed, the, 1/16" punch to mark both sides of the front leg, needle file route, making the crevice slightly high to, "force" the leg tighter to the frame. He also recommends a touch of Loctite, and even a very slight bend toward the rear of the front leg.

To remove the old ejector, saturate the ejector hole and legs with Kroil or Liquid Wrench SUPER Penetrant (not the regular stuff), put the frame upside down with the ejector in a bench vice, let it sit for a few minutes and then lift the frame off along the axis of the ejector.

Colt ejectors come pre creviced, but won't aways fit non-Colt frames. Springfield ejectors are not, and also have legs that have to be trimmed to fit most frames.
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Old 08-01-2003, 08:32 AM
Deke Deke is offline
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I did exactly as jim2 said when I put a Nowlin match ejector on my Mil-Spec. Cutting the notch slightly high (I mean slightly) is a good recommendation. That forces a good tight fit when tapping in the pin. I got a great installation (didn't need Loctite), but there was about a 1/32" overhang at the rear of the slide. A little filing and stoning dressed that up. Hard chrome from Tripp took care of the finish work. Otherwise I would had used a dab of cold blue. Good luck with your installation.
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Old 08-01-2003, 08:54 AM
aclundwall aclundwall is offline
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Thanks all.

Kuhnhausen also suggests cutting the notch a little high, but didn't give any suggestions about how to locate the notch on the leg of the ejector.

Using a punch to mark the post is the way to go, it seems. I hesitated to do this because I didn't want to damage the holes in the frame. It seems I can only hit straight on with a hammer when it doesn't really matter

Once it's marked, I'll try the files first, and as a last resort I'll use the dremel. Sometimes those dremels seem to have a mind of their own....
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Old 08-01-2003, 09:23 AM
Deke Deke is offline
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I recommend a round needle file (mine are diamond blade) vice the Dremel. That way you control the pace and amount of metal removed, not the whirring machine. Patience really is a virtue. This is not rocket science. Take your time and it will turn out perfectly.
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Old 08-01-2003, 11:15 AM
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John Harrison John Harrison is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by aclundwall
Thanks all.

Kuhnhausen also suggests cutting the notch a little high, but didn't give any suggestions about how to locate the notch on the leg of the ejector.

Using a punch to mark the post is the way to go, it seems. I hesitated to do this because I didn't want to damage the holes in the frame. It seems I can only hit straight on with a hammer when it doesn't really matter

Once it's marked, I'll try the files first, and as a last resort I'll use the dremel. Sometimes those dremels seem to have a mind of their own....
If you'll color the legs with a magic marker, then insert the ejector to full depth, you can stick the punch in the hole and mark the leg without really hitting the punch. Just twirl it between your fingers and it'll mark the leg. If you whack the leg too hard, you might have to fight to get the ejector back out of the frame.

I personally would not try a Dremel and have never found an ejector that I couldn't cut with a file. I use a #2 swiss needle file 6" long. Good Luck!
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  #10  
Old 08-01-2003, 02:26 PM
Dave in NC Dave in NC is offline
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Hey, I'm replacing my Kimber Compact's ejector tonight! Quite a coincidence

Any Kimber-specific advice? Does Kimber tend to use an adhesive along w/ the pin? The gun is stainless and so is the ejector--does SS behave any differently than carbon? The pin looks to be carbon so it will be harder than the SS parts, right??

-Dave
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