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  #1  
Old 07-13-2003, 11:40 AM
PJS Buck PJS Buck is offline
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Ramped vs. non-ramped barrels?




What is the difference and the IMPLICATIONS of each one, between a ramped and non-ramped barrel? Is one better, more reliable, more desirable, more accurate, etc. than the other and if so why?

THanks,

Pat
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  #2  
Old 07-13-2003, 12:13 PM
CastleBravo CastleBravo is offline
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Re: Ramped vs. non-ramped barrels?

Quote:
Originally posted by PJS Buck
What is the difference and the IMPLICATIONS of each one, between a ramped and non-ramped barrel? Is one better, more reliable, more desirable, more accurate, etc. than the other and if so why?

THanks,

Pat
It depends.

You can set up a ramped barrel to provide more case support for higher-pressure cartridges like .40 S&W or .38 Super. However, ramped barrels are a reliability disadvantage in .45 ACP guns, and have no impact on accuracy or durabilitiy.
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  #3  
Old 07-13-2003, 12:46 PM
Boats Boats is offline
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Re: Re: Ramped vs. non-ramped barrels?

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Originally posted by CastleBravo
It depends.

You can set up a ramped barrel to provide more case support for higher-pressure cartridges like .40 S&W or .38 Super. However, ramped barrels are a reliability disadvantage in .45 ACP guns, and have no impact on accuracy or durabilitiy.
I'll have to disagree with you one this one Sean. I have both frame ramped 1911s and barrel ramped ones. There has been no disceranble reliability advantage to one set-up or the other. Maybe that is due to the fact that I only use Wolff recoils springs, but it definitely isn't because one feedramp hangs up any more or less than the other.

My conclusion? It doesn't matter because both set-ups, DONE RIGHT, work just fine.
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Old 07-13-2003, 02:46 PM
CastleBravo CastleBravo is offline
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IMHO you are confusing the specific with the general. Just because you have a ramped barrel .45 that works doesn't mean that the aren't a hindrance to reliability in general. There are folks that have reliable Lorcins, too.

And Wolff recoil springs are irrelevant to this topic.
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  #5  
Old 07-13-2003, 02:51 PM
Boats Boats is offline
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Ouch. Are you in a bad mood today?
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  #6  
Old 07-13-2003, 05:11 PM
stans stans is offline
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Here is my take on this subject.

Ramped barrels in 45 ACP are not needed, but can be a safety margin if shooting 45 Super.

Ramped barrels are a must if shooting 38 Super loaded to IPSC major power levels.

Ramped barrels are a better mouse trap when it comes to the 40 S&W.

Ramped barrels may provide a safety margin with 10mm if maximum velocity is your goal.
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  #7  
Old 07-13-2003, 05:40 PM
CastleBravo CastleBravo is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by Boats
Ouch. Are you in a bad mood today?
LOL, naah, but I'm glad you didn't take my post too seriously and get bent over it.
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  #8  
Old 07-13-2003, 08:02 PM
PJS Buck PJS Buck is offline
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let me clarify

my question is in regard to only .45acp rounds and as the ramped barrel component may or may not affect reliability, feedibility, stove piping, etc.

Pat
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  #9  
Old 07-13-2003, 08:20 PM
blooddic blooddic is offline
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I asked Novak's

I was wondering the same thing and had so many opinons from all the mags I read. Now if any one should know, Joe and Wayne should.

I will quote the best that I can.

The only cal. that need a ramped barrel in a 1911 type handgun are:

9mm and 38 super,9 [and some of them wierd cals] I was told the reason was for feeding for the narrow bullet, not for shell saftey support.
Once you install the ramped barrel you still have to open the barrel up all the way around so it feeds well and that takes away the support that I through it needed.

10mm/40/ 45 no ramped barrel is need.

This is what I was told last week.
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  #10  
Old 07-14-2003, 06:25 PM
PJS Buck PJS Buck is offline
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so,

Do ramped barrels have a negative effect on reliability, or are they less reliable inherently?

I ask because I am considering another 1911 purchase and have read (don't know if this is correct or not that's why I am asking here) that ramped barrels tend to be associated with jam/feed problems.

Help?

Pat
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  #11  
Old 07-15-2003, 10:40 AM
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RickB RickB is online now
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A friend of mine has had nothing but trouble with the ramped barrel in his Para P-14, but I don't know that it is a problem inherent in ramped barrels. It could be related to his sizing die, bullet diameter, crimp, etc. I have never had any feeding problems with non-ramped barrels, so, based on my observations, the ramped barrel is a reliability hindrance. I'm sure lots of people, like Boats, have no trouble with them.
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  #12  
Old 07-15-2003, 11:21 AM
anchoryanker23 anchoryanker23 is offline
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The new liteweight SA compacts have a ramped barrel, because of the aluminum frame. sometimes a aluminum framed 1911's feedramp can wear down if you shoot alot of hollowpoints through it, so in that case a ramped barrel may be necessary. I am having a ramped barrel put in my liteweight commander for that reason.
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  #13  
Old 07-15-2003, 12:59 PM
shane45-1911 shane45-1911 is offline
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I have several examples of ramped and non-ramped, and I am comfortable saying that if everything else is set up properly with regards to springs and timing, that ramped vs. non-ramped is a non-issue. I don't feel that one offers any more reliability than the other with regard to function.

You may want a more supported chamber that a ramped barrel offers in some calibers, but it is not necessary in the relatively low pressure .45 ACP.
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  #14  
Old 07-15-2003, 02:15 PM
nick allen nick allen is offline
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I have a ramped barrel in my DW Razorback 10mm, which was installed by DW per my request after I had a KABOOM with the stock nonramped barrel.


I had posted pictures of my unsupported barrel chamber and most felt it was overthroated and that was the cause of the KABOOM.


With the new Briley barrel I can see where oal can sometimes pose a feeding issue. I throated and polished the barrel myself and it feeds great with one exception, and that is with a fully loaded mag the first round sometimes has trouble makeing it up the feed ramp. I do know that if I make a small effort to make sure thr first round is in perfect position in the magazine it jumps right in the chamber. Now with seven rounds in the mag, no problems what so ever.

I will note one last thing I am useing Wolff extra power mag springs.


If I had it to do over I would choose the ramped barrel over the nonramped anyday, as the brass shows absolutly no buldge. Which makes life a little eaiser when reloading the brass.






Nick
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  #15  
Old 07-20-2003, 04:20 PM
duncan duncan is offline
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Funny but most of the 9mm 1911s have ramped barrels.

Looking at Brownell's inventory of 40SW and 10mm barrels, they are mainly ramped too.

For high pressure rounds, you really want that extra case support - just in case.
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  #16  
Old 07-20-2003, 04:46 PM
farscott farscott is offline
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I have two 9x19 1911's, one with a ramped barrel (STI Trojan 5.0) and one with a non-ramped barrel (Colt Series 80 Government Model in 9x23 and 9x19), and they both work just fine. I agree that if the pistol is properly adjusted, the feed ramp type is not an issue.

The strength of the brass is an issue when determining the need for a ramped barrel or, more properly, a fully supported barrel. 9x23 brass is extremely strong and although it operates at very high pressures (higher than 10mm Auto), a fully supported barrel is not needed.

.40 S&W brass is not as strong, and it may be well require a fully supported barrel. My Trojan 6.0 in .40 S&W has a ramped barrel, and the fired brass has no bulges, making it easy to find compared to brass fired from Glocks chambered for the same round. Because this pistol has a frame set-up for a ramped barrel, the 10mm Auto barrel I am adding will also be ramped. But my DW RZ-10 has a non-ramped barrel, and the brass looks fine now that I have adjusted the extractor.

If one has an aluminum framed pistol, a ramped barrel can insure that the bullet moves against steel rather than aluminum alloy, eliminating frame wear.
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