1911Forum
Forum   Reviews   Rules   Legal   Site Supporters & Donations   Advertise


Go Back   1911Forum > Hardware & Accessories > Gunsmithing & Troubleshooting


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 05-19-2003, 09:25 PM
fremont fremont is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Posts: 2,156
How bad are gun cleaning solvents for you?




I got yelled at by the missus when I went to bed last night regarding the solvent smell on my hands. I washed them **SEVERAL** times, but the smell was still there. Then, she started in on me about solvent in my system, cancer.....you know the drill.

How bad is solvent anyway?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 05-19-2003, 09:31 PM
USMCsilver USMCsilver is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Middle of SC
Age: 36
Posts: 358
Nothin' beats the smell of Hoppe's in the morning!

I don't think anything is really wrong as long as you use them in a well ventilated area.
__________________
The Original USMCsilver
The 1911 Project in Review ~~ Click to see how it went...
NEED YOUR SLIDE REFINISHED? CLICK HERE FOR DETAILS!
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 05-19-2003, 09:49 PM
Nix Nix is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Age: 51
Posts: 32
Use MPro7. It's the best stuff out there plus it is safe and oderless!
http://www.mp7.com/NCompetative.htm
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 05-19-2003, 09:54 PM
RobWest RobWest is offline
Banned
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Puyallup, WA 98375
Age: 28
Posts: 486
Breakfree CLP.

Best. Solvent. Ever.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 05-19-2003, 10:16 PM
lanyard_loop lanyard_loop is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Just South of Disneyland
Posts: 585
After using MPro7, you will hate the old
technology stinky cleaners. I still use brake
cleaner to remove the MPro7.

Lanyard.

__________________
If you are not a member of the NRA, then you are part of the problem!
Click here to join the NRA.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 05-20-2003, 05:52 AM
VF-40's Avatar
VF-40 VF-40 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 101
I see Breakfree has LP without the solvent. Has anyone had any experience with it.

VF-40

Last edited by VF-40; 05-26-2003 at 04:44 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 05-20-2003, 07:37 AM
Double Naught Spy Double Naught Spy is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Horn Hill, Texas
Posts: 3,474
How bad are solvents for you anyway? That all depends. What specific solvents are you talking about?

Brake cleaner, for example, is a strong concinogen that you don't want to breath or get in contact with your skin.

Many, like brake cleaner, are transdermal and will pass from your skin and into your body and circulate via the bloodstream.

If you have solvent on your hands and you can smell it after several washings, then you know that the fluid has permeated your skin to the point that soak is not removing it. That can happen with a lot of fluids, not just solvents, but you get the idea that the solvent isn't just simply on your skin.

Instead of asking up here how bad solvents are, why not take the various products in question and read the warning labels? Find the contents or chemical names and do a search for them on the internet.

How bad are solvents anyway? Well, one way to look at the issue would be to look at how they can be disposed of properly. I think you will find that most solvents and many petrol products fall under the guise of toxic waste.
__________________
Carpe Sus!
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 05-20-2003, 09:01 AM
Rosco Benson's Avatar
Rosco Benson Rosco Benson is offline
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Posts: 2,878
Exposure to gun cleaning products can have some significant side effects. Exposure can stimulate the portion of the brain that causes one to be skeptical of blathering news anchors, newspaper writers, and liberal politicians. In extreme cases, the person so exposed starts losing interest in the safe, socially-mandated practice of sitting passively in front of the televisor and, instead, goes to range, loads ammo, or dry-practices. Some even go so far as to curl up with a good book!

Exposure can also manifest itself in a preference for red meat and potatoes and a distaste for tofu, yogurt, bean sprouts, and other such rabbit food.

Many of the exposed lose patience with the mindless prattle of the sheep-like masses and start socializing primarily with other persons who suffer from gun-cleaning product exposure.

Dangerous indeed!

Rosco
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 05-20-2003, 09:43 AM
BarbWire BarbWire is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 250
if ur getting that much on ur hands ur probably overdoing it.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 05-20-2003, 01:19 PM
ogman911 ogman911 is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 27
i usally inhale the stuff..and look at me!
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 05-20-2003, 02:11 PM
FJD463 FJD463 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Northeast
Posts: 158
Anyone wear disposable gloves while cleaning their gun to avoid contact with the solvents ??
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 05-20-2003, 02:17 PM
Real Hawkeye Real Hawkeye is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 1,716
Strong solvents, when the fumes are breathed in, will disolve your lung tissues.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 05-20-2003, 02:26 PM
bountyhunter bountyhunter is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: NaziFornia
Posts: 3,166
Re: How bad are gun cleaning solvents for you?

Quote:
Originally posted by fremont
I got yelled at by the missus when I went to bed last night regarding the solvent smell on my hands. I washed them **SEVERAL** times, but the smell was still there. Then, she started in on me about solvent in my system, cancer.....you know the drill.

How bad is solvent anyway?
It will probably add years to your life if you use enough because it will make your wife leave you and then you can focus on the things that really make a man happy (shooting guns).

If you want a stinkless cleaner that will silence the sposal unit, MPRO7 is very good and odor free.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 05-20-2003, 02:27 PM
saluki9 saluki9 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Posts: 838
A sample of one person is not a reason to believe that solvents or smoking is ok.

For everybody who smokes and eats red meat into their 90's, I can give you three who died of a stroke or lung cancer in their 30's and 40's.

Living is dangerous enough, try to limit your exposure to any of the gun scrubber type products, these indeed to cause cancer. I do often wear surgical gloves when cleaning my guns. I also wear a $30 3M respirator when shooting at indoor ranges.
__________________
Alcohol... Tobacco... Firearms... Who's bringing the chips?
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 05-20-2003, 02:28 PM
bountyhunter bountyhunter is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: NaziFornia
Posts: 3,166
Quote:
Originally posted by Real Hawkeye
Strong solvents, when the fumes are breathed in, will disolve your lung tissues.
NOPE. I painted cars for years and breathed enough lacquer thinner fumes to stone out everybody at Woodstock. The fumes can be an irritant and it bothers some people more than others, but they don't "dissolve" any part of your body. Brain damage is a possibility if you sniff them for recreation.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 05-20-2003, 02:36 PM
Mark S. Mark S. is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Fullerton, CA
Posts: 415
The warnings on those solvent containers are there for a reason.

However, a few simple precautions can reduce the danger substantially. Use disposable gloves and a respirator rated for organic solvents. Make sure that you use the solvents only in areas with very good ventilation. And, be careful about disposal of solvent soaked patches and rags.

Many solvents will penetrate the disposable gloves to some extent, so it's a good idea to wash your hands thoroughly after using them.
__________________
Holocaust Day of Remembrance - May 5, 2005. Never Again!

We've got the Shield of Abraham (and the protection of Moses - John MOSES Browning).
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 05-20-2003, 05:02 PM
Double Naught Spy Double Naught Spy is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Horn Hill, Texas
Posts: 3,474
Yes, it is true that there may be other things that are more dangerous to you than the occasional contact with and breathing in of solvents, such as auto accidents. Just because there are things that are more dangerous does not mean that one should not worry about the effects. DHMeieio, I understand your point, but the reality is that few people will ever redouble their efforts in car safety as opposed to spending the same effort on safely handling chemicals such as solvents. So a lot of folks will still be lax in the handling of chemicals and go about their business thinking to themselves that they are at more risk of injury in an autowreck and therefore blow off the risk posed by chemicals.

Where things get particularly troublesome is when a given individual has some sort of inability to deal with the solvents in their system. This may be due to a genetic predisposition, combined effects of multiple chemical insults (not just one type of solvent, but several), or even drug interactions where a medication you are taking somehow affects the body's ability to deal with the solvent insult.

Sort of like with lead poisoning or mechanical hearing loss, the process can be slow and the effects happen over a long period of time before getting to be really detrimental. Often, such effects occur so slowly that folks are apt not to associate the cause with the effect and hence don't do anything to correct it. Because they don't correct it and don't understand it, it just gets worse.

These days, with all the stuff known to help germinate cancer in the human body, do we really want to voluntarily introduce that many more like solvents?
__________________
Carpe Sus!
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 05-20-2003, 05:51 PM
gigi*riva gigi*riva is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: A Place on a Lake
Posts: 756
Toxicology axiom No. 1: there are no toxic compounds, only toxic levels. If you shoot every night at an indoor range, then go at the gun with break cleaner when you get home, I'd guess your exposure might be of some significance. Once a week? Every two weeks? I'm not worried...
__________________
Ti faccio vedere come muore un italiano
Fabrizio Quattrocchi
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 05-20-2003, 08:46 PM
telcom911 telcom911 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: between NY and CA
Age: 43
Posts: 351
To heck with me

I'm worried more about my gun, no solvents touch my toys. Maybe my Marine Corp training stuck a little to well, but CLP and a nylon brush is all I clean with- solvents is for weenies and squids .
__________________
"Stand your ground; don't fire unless fired upon, but if they mean to have a war, let it begin here."

-April 19, 1775 Orders to the militia from Captain John Parker, commander of the seventy colonial minutemen who met more than seven hundred British troops under the command of General Thomas Gage at the Villiage Green, Lexington
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 05-20-2003, 11:43 PM
ken3006 ken3006 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Arizona
Age: 49
Posts: 120
I use either Hoppe's or Gunscrubber to clean mine. I clean them in a well ventilated area and usually use rubber gloves. I don't know how bad the solvents really are, but I know they can't be any good for you either.
__________________
Ken O.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 05-21-2003, 04:09 AM
re1973 re1973 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: usa
Posts: 116
I agree with Roscoe Benson.

Common sense tells me using Kleenbore Copper Cutter, out on my deck is a whole bunch healthier than being couped up indoors where dustmites and allergens have deposited themselves in my HVAC ducts. Especially if I have done something stupid like turn on the idiot box and some blathering liberal idiot is mouthing off.

Then again, your supposed to clean 'em? OOPs, I just read the part about shooting them...

Does hot soap and water count...I mean I needed to get the mud and stuff off ...didn't want to dirty the holster you know.
__________________
Use Enough Gun
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 05-21-2003, 09:31 PM
LAK LAK is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Posts: 4,305
I wouldn't worry about toxicity unless you are getting your hands saturated every other day. Just take the general precautions some have already mentioned.

Many supermarket gloves are not solvent resistant. Perhaps the best are the nitrile type which you might find at an auto parts store, other industry speciality dealer or on the web.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 05-22-2003, 09:07 PM
Blackmore Blackmore is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: North Central New England
Posts: 478
Now that medical glove use is strictly the latex-free varieties, there is a glut of latex gloves available for short money. If you're not allergic to latex, it's a cheap way to protect yourself while cleaning your guns. Been doing it for years. I've never seen a firearm with a latex allergy.
__________________
A professional is someone who can do his best work when he doesn't feel like it.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 05-23-2003, 03:37 PM
Mastrogiacomo Mastrogiacomo is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 436
Some people may find it odd, but when ever I'm cleaning my guns, I always wear Latex gloves -- and throw them out once I'm done. Also, wash my hands before and after cleaning.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:53 PM.


NOTICE TO USERS OF THIS SITE: By continuing to use this site, you certify that you have read and agree to abide by the Legal Terms of Use. All information, data, text or other materials ("Content") posted to this site by any users are the sole responsibility of those users. 1911Forum does not guarantee the accuracy, integrity, or quality of such Content.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 2011 1911Forum.com, LLC. All Rights Reserved