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  #1  
Old 10-22-2013, 06:59 AM
TheTinMan TheTinMan is offline
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How To Reload 45-70




Now this is an educational video:

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=3duhNVj...%3D3duhNVjAu6E

No worries about using a pesky scale or optimizing COAL!

Actually I find it fascinating that hand loading could be done with such simple tools. Hammering the new primer into the case does give me the willies though. So does loading a cartridge which can handle chamber pressure up to 50,000 psi this way.

I'm confused about the fact that he doesn't appear to bell the case mouth. Must be part of the "sizing" step.

Mighty nice rifle! I want an 1895 that holds 9 rounds in the chamber.
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  #2  
Old 10-22-2013, 07:32 AM
Clyde the Pointer Clyde the Pointer is online now
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That is about as real as it gets. Awesome. Love the birds.
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  #3  
Old 10-22-2013, 08:29 AM
Old Grumpy Old Grumpy is offline
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Lee Loaders have been around for quite some time and I suspect cartridges were reloaded in a similar way ever since center-fire ammunition was invented. The only question I have is where does he plug in his case tumbler?


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  #4  
Old 10-22-2013, 10:16 AM
Boomer121906 Boomer121906 is offline
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Tht didn't look too bad. I've been thinking about getting a couple LEE loaders just for SHTF scenarios. Now that I've seen one in action I'm def getting a couple. Maybe one in .45 and another in .223. Or do they even make a bottle neck one. Probably not. No biggie I'll just make the rifle one a .44 mag for the 1894. Thanks for sharing.
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  #5  
Old 10-22-2013, 10:56 AM
Nick A Nick A is offline
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That's the Lee Loader. Go look it up if you haven't seen one.

Surprisingly, they can make good ammo if you take care.
Even match grade if you're careful enough.


Hammering the primer isn't bad. In all those years, don't think I ever set one off.
The tool keeps the primer straight, you just gotta be sure you keep the brass straight.
Most guys who set off a primer aren't careful with the brass.


The yellow scoops come in different sizes, you measure powder that way.
Use a scale to figure out the weight of each powder for each scoop.


Belling case mouth: RCBS die sets had no expander for many years.
I still use a 380 Auto set with no expander.
You need to set the bullet precisely and start it carefully.
Sometimes you young fellers just don't know how good you got it.


Many of us started on the Lee Loader.
It teaches you A LOT about the process and how it works.
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  #6  
Old 10-22-2013, 02:17 PM
Hybris Hybris is offline
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As I am living with my parents and don't have a good place to set up any sort of reloading bench let alone a simple workbench, I see this as a good way ease my way into reloading without the expense or space requirements of a proper press.
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  #7  
Old 10-22-2013, 04:07 PM
TheGerk TheGerk is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTinMan View Post
Now this is an educational video:

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=3duhNVj...%3D3duhNVjAu6E

No worries about using a pesky scale or optimizing COAL!

Actually I find it fascinating that hand loading could be done with such simple tools. Hammering the new primer into the case does give me the willies though. So does loading a cartridge which can handle chamber pressure up to 50,000 psi this way.

I'm confused about the fact that he doesn't appear to bell the case mouth. Must be part of the "sizing" step.

Mighty nice rifle! I want an 1895 that holds 9 rounds in the chamber.
Tin Man, you don’t have to be a scared to load the primer with these LEE loader kits
As Nick mentioned, if you maintain your alignment of the case in the die it goes pretty uneventful.

As far as charging the cases goes, “throwing” powder charges has been around since the beginning of Handloading.

For basic loading they work very well and the kits like the LEE loader while a little “dated” for what most folks would consider modern production loading equipment are better suited now for say the survivalist or “bug out” mode application where these kits are ideal for these modes of loading.

The powder scoops are all in increasing graduated cubic centimeter volumes
So when using the LEE tarage table included in the kit you just apply the published load data and cross reference the tables to see which scoop is appropriate for your powder and charge weight you want to apply
For safety you generally look for a scoop that will throw about 10% below maximum load data for the powder used and tweak from there (if possible)
Or, for milder loading just find a scoop that matches the data closer to the starting charge weight data.
It’s all pretty simple.

About the only thing you gotta watch out for is using powders with extreme or very high load density, as you can understand, here powders like AA 8700 with its high loading density may not “transpose” as accurately as desired so additional attention may be warranted.
Or, powders like 296/H110 where loading below known minimum reductions in charge weight are regarded as not safe.
So checking with a scale to see what “exact” percentage you are above or below the data with a given powder throw and “recommended scoop” with some powders is advised, then just make the adjustment to your throws and note the specifics in your load log.
But for the most part the system works very well as designed.

Here are some pics of the LEE measuring kit Tin Man
I use these now as a way of accelerating my loading using my auto dispensing loading from my Lyman 1200
If I’m loading say 46.5grs. of Varget into a 45-70 case for one of my mild loadings in this caliber I set the Lyman for 46.5grs. and then find a scoop that will deliver around ~ 32 to 35grs.

This way, once I hit the button to start a load dispense from the Lyman I just “throw” a scoop of Varget from a bowl into the powder tray on the scale and the machine “whirs up” for a couple of second and then just “trickles” in the last few tenths of the load.
It cuts the loading time into a block of cases down by about 80% making loading into the loading block very productive.

The LEE Measuring Kit

Calibrated Powder Scoops

Tarage Tables



Good Luck
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  #8  
Old 10-22-2013, 05:13 PM
Temper Temper is offline
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I started out with a Lee Loader in .243 a few.... years ago. It served me well and the ammo was surprisingly accurate.

If I remember correctly it cost me just over a dollar to reload a box of 20.
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  #9  
Old 10-22-2013, 07:44 PM
grubbylabs grubbylabs is offline
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It is quite suprising how accurate those Lee powder scoops are.
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  #10  
Old 10-22-2013, 07:47 PM
TheTinMan TheTinMan is offline
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Nick - one of the things I thought was cool about the video was seeing each step in the process.

Gerk - I need to get myself a set of those scoops! Your suggestion for speeding up the process with an automatic powder thrower like my RCBS ChargeMaster is fantastic.

I hadn't thought about teowawki applications but am thinking now. I wouldn't want to load hot .357 Magnum cartridges this way but .45 Auto - no problem.

Besides, it's fun to watch that guy hand loading (literally) on his stump in the woods.
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  #11  
Old 10-22-2013, 11:44 PM
Don2 Don2 is offline
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I have and use several sets of Lee Loaders.
They are kinda "Back to basics" for me. Every now and then I'll pull a set out...usually 38 special and build a box of them just for the heck of it.

I think the sleeve that you insert the bullet into down to the brass holds the bullet straight so it will start pretty good.

Hammering on the primers ar not a real problem as long as what you are hammering with is not pointed..!!!!!

I also have a few Lee Loaders for shot shells.
over the years, I have picked these Lee loaders up at garage sales and flea markets for just a few dollars up to $15 each.

Whats interesting about them is that your whole reloading needs can be put into your pocket...A large pocket..!!

To me...They are fun to use, I'm surprised sometimes how many I can crank out if I get into it.

Don2
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  #12  
Old 10-23-2013, 12:00 AM
Nick A Nick A is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTinMan View Post
Besides, it's fun to watch that guy hand loading (literally) on his stump in the woods.
Yes. And that reminded me...

We were never sure if it was true, but back in the 60's we kept hearing
about an old guy who hung out in a bar at an Indian reservation with a
30-30 Lee Loader. The Indians would bring their brass, and
he would reload their rifle shells right there on top of the bar.
The Indians bought him his beers in exchange.

We never were sure if the story was true, but laughing about that story among us
while loading our own ammo just seemed to make it that much more special.



Don2, load up some ammo while you tell that story to your friends.
They'll probably sit there and watch you work with their mouths open.

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  #13  
Old 10-23-2013, 08:21 AM
CherokeeXJ CherokeeXJ is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick A View Post
That's the Lee Loader. Go look it up if you haven't seen one.

Surprisingly, they can make good ammo if you take care.
Even match grade if you're careful enough.


Hammering the primer isn't bad. In all those years, don't think I ever set one off.
The tool keeps the primer straight, you just gotta be sure you keep the brass straight.
Most guys who set off a primer aren't careful with the brass.


The yellow scoops come in different sizes, you measure powder that way.
Use a scale to figure out the weight of each powder for each scoop.


Belling case mouth: RCBS die sets had no expander for many years.
I still use a 380 Auto set with no expander.
You need to set the bullet precisely and start it carefully.
Sometimes you young fellers just don't know how good you got it.


Many of us started on the Lee Loader.
It teaches you A LOT about the process and how it works.
Yep, that's the Lee loader. Have one in .38/.357. It'll do a good job just NOT high speed. I use a Lee powder funnel,and a hand primer tool.
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  #14  
Old 10-23-2013, 08:47 AM
Don2 Don2 is offline
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Thanks for the story Nick, I think I found me a part time job..!!!

One of the guys who started me into handloading is an American Indian that served our country in the Viet-Nam war.
He would love to hear that story....(true or not)

I can just see the guy at the end of the bar with his Lee Loader, hammer in hand, gulping down mugs of beer making ammo.

Sounds like a great part time job to me..!!!

Don2
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  #15  
Old 10-23-2013, 08:53 AM
Capt. Methane Capt. Methane is offline
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One dark, cold and rainy Pacific Northwest night many years ago we were cleaning the muzzle loaders in the basement after the monthly club shoot and someone asked "How'd you like to be outside doing this in the shelter of a fallen log?"...

Simple volumetric measures go back to the days of black powder and even the most expensive modern measures are volume based-they just have a knob to adjust the volume of powder to achieve the desired weight!

Back in the day people were doing just what this guy was doing, reloading the brass for their Sharps Rifles out on the American Plains, or for English doubles in Africa...and melting lead over a wood fire to cast their bullets. It's a time-proven method and it's kind of neat to see someone showing how simple reloading can be.

Still, I don't think I'll trade in my bench for a stump any time soon!
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