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  #1  
Old 02-20-2013, 04:38 PM
michaelnel michaelnel is offline
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Ransom Rest




This is the setup my buddy have been using to test loads with my Ransom rest. He bought the chronograph. That's his Kimber in the rest in the photo, since we both shoot 1911s (mine is a Les Baer) we only needed to buy the one grip insert (although we had to modify it for his ambi safety). The bench is pretty sturdy, and because it is a LEO range and we usually shoot there on weekends, we usually have the place to ourselves. The LEOs shoot during the week.

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  #2  
Old 02-20-2013, 04:44 PM
UrbanSI UrbanSI is offline
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Very cool, always wanted to test my loads through one, just never had the opportunity or the time to truly invest in the equipment.

My uncle does have one that he was infatuated with for about 5 years, developed loads like a mad man. For some reason he lost interest and packed it up and cant find it. I have offered to buy it from him but he doesn't need the money apparently. He did sell me his BAER a few years back for well under cost which also came with a copy of his load book.

Anyways, you have any results?
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  #3  
Old 02-20-2013, 04:46 PM
Nick A Nick A is offline
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Very nice. That clamped board setup is fairly standard for RR. It works.

If you ever get the Windage base,
it is very handy for shooting groups
without moving the target stand.
Use the RR elevation adjustment up n down
and the windage base left and right
you can shoot a dozen groups on one paper.
Unless your groups are larger than your paper size.
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  #4  
Old 02-20-2013, 04:51 PM
michaelnel michaelnel is offline
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Well, on my first try reloading Nosler Custom Competition (match grade) 185gr hollowpoints I shot these groups (0.63", 0.75" and 0.90" five shots) at 25 yards with the Ransom rest (from my Les Baer TRS):



The best from his Kimber are these two groups (also at 25 yards):


Last edited by michaelnel; 02-20-2013 at 04:54 PM.
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  #5  
Old 02-20-2013, 05:00 PM
learjet56 learjet56 is offline
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Very nice. I really want to get a ransom to test my loads. The 5.4 grain load is very nice. Looks like you found the sweetspot for that load and your Baer
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  #6  
Old 02-20-2013, 05:10 PM
michaelnel michaelnel is offline
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I just bought 1000 more of those bullets (btw, Graf's notified me this morning they have 1000 lots in stock right now), and this weekend we are going to test 100 rounds I made up. I loaded 10 of each at 5.0, 5.2, 5.3, 5.4 and 5.5 grains.

The first 50 are thrown charges (from my RCBS "Competition" powder measure) and the other batch are the same but each one was trickled up to weight using a Hornady Quick Trickle and Gempro 250 scale. Using Titegroup powder as in the ones above.

All cartridges are once fired Winchester cases with Federal LP primers. We want to see what powder charge is best (that first batch was seated with OAL too long) and whether it really makes a difference to trickle & weigh the charges.

I am hoping it doesn't make a significant difference, because man is that a slow process, but I would love to see that pistol print 0.5" or less at 25 yards. We got close last time, I bet it can do it.
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  #7  
Old 02-20-2013, 06:04 PM
parisite parisite is offline
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I've always thought fast burn rate powders will shoot tighter groups in 45 acp than medium burn rate handgun powders.
From your experience with the ransom rest do you see this as true?

Last edited by parisite; 02-20-2013 at 06:47 PM.
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  #8  
Old 02-20-2013, 06:24 PM
michaelnel michaelnel is offline
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Sorry, I don't have anywhere near enough experience with reloading .45 to be able to even guess.
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  #9  
Old 02-20-2013, 07:14 PM
BYJO4 BYJO4 is offline
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That is certainly the way to develop accurate loads. I would sure like that setup.
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  #10  
Old 02-20-2013, 08:07 PM
learjet56 learjet56 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by michaelnel View Post
I just bought 1000 more of those bullets (btw, Graf's notified me this morning they have 1000 lots in stock right now), and this weekend we are going to test 100 rounds I made up. I loaded 10 of each at 5.0, 5.2, 5.3, 5.4 and 5.5 grains.

The first 50 are thrown charges (from my RCBS "Competition" powder measure) and the other batch are the same but each one was trickled up to weight using a Hornady Quick Trickle and Gempro 250 scale. Using Titegroup powder as in the ones above.

All cartridges are once fired Winchester cases with Federal LP primers. We want to see what powder charge is best (that first batch was seated with OAL too long) and whether it really makes a difference to trickle & weigh the charges.

I am hoping it doesn't make a significant difference, because man is that a slow process, but I would love to see that pistol print 0.5" or less at 25 yards. We got close last time, I bet it can do it.
I really enjoy comparing loads. I am curious how your new loads come out. Be sure and give us a report.
I bet you will get down down to .5 group. If you get real close it would be interesting to see if just changing the OAL without changing the charge will tweak it enough to make .5. By the way great job on working up your loads.
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  #11  
Old 02-20-2013, 08:22 PM
richpetrone richpetrone is offline
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Ransom Rest set up

It looks like a good set up, but I would not use large C-clamps for extensive testing. Best to bolt it down....
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  #12  
Old 02-20-2013, 09:26 PM
michaelnel michaelnel is offline
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If you have your own range I guess you can bolt it down, but I don't. It doesn't move when it's clamped down tight, and that is the way the mfg recommends you use it.
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  #13  
Old 02-20-2013, 09:31 PM
Steel head Steel head is offline
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I'm contemplating buying a ransom rest and grip adapters and putting a new gun purchase on hold.
I'd love to see how much I'm holding back my 1911 and 22 pistol.
I have my own range at home so I could play with it whenever I want.
Hmm
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  #14  
Old 02-20-2013, 10:32 PM
old cop old cop is offline
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I have had best luck with the Nosler bullets and 231. 5.5-5.7 gr. for around 750 fps.

If you look at a burning rate chart 231 at the slower end of the popular .45 powders but I think the most important thing is to have a velocity between 725-775 and then see which shoots best in your gun.
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  #15  
Old 02-20-2013, 11:36 PM
Nick A Nick A is offline
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[Psst... Of course best to bolt it down, but even Ransom International approves of C-clamps if your wood base is sturdy. As you can see from your groups, your base is sturdy and the clamps are holding.]
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  #16  
Old 02-21-2013, 05:53 AM
parisite parisite is offline
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To bolt it down you would have to drill holes in the table belonging to the shooting range.........some how I don't think they would appreciate that.
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  #17  
Old 02-21-2013, 06:16 AM
Boomer121906 Boomer121906 is offline
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Man that really makes me want a RR. Once I find some land this summer it'll def be at the top of my list.they are pricey but worth it when working up loads .heck they are cheap compared to most guns.
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  #18  
Old 02-21-2013, 06:25 AM
JimC JimC is offline
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I've tried using my RR in this manner, clamped down, but after only a few shots, it moves ever so slightly which effects the testing.
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  #19  
Old 02-21-2013, 06:35 AM
michaelnel michaelnel is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimC View Post
I've tried using my RR in this manner, clamped down, but after only a few shots, it moves ever so slightly which effects the testing.
We put witness marks on the plywood base and the bench it is clamped to, and I assure you it is not moving.

What you do need to do is be careful how you clamp the gun in place with equal tension on the three clamp knobs and equal distance between the grip adapters.

We found you have to pull the remote trigger carefully by putting your fingers on that red spring cap and your thumb on the red trigger bar and squeezing them together.

You have to seat the gun in the grip adapters with 10-15 full power hardball loads, and then never move the pistol again by touching anything but the pad on the rest that is designed for that (lots of folks just grab the muzzle and lower the gun after firing that way, but you really shouldn't do that).

Make sure nobody is touching the bench when you fire.

Lower the gun after the shot using the pad and do it gently, don't bang it back down.

If you keep all those things in mind, it helps the rest help you to see the best accuracy.
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  #20  
Old 02-21-2013, 10:36 AM
michaelnel michaelnel is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick A View Post
Very nice. That clamped board setup is fairly standard for RR. It works.

If you ever get the Windage base,
it is very handy for shooting groups
without moving the target stand.
Use the RR elevation adjustment up n down
and the windage base left and right
you can shoot a dozen groups on one paper.
Unless your groups are larger than your paper size.
I just now ordered the windage base from Midway. I had been thinking about it and your post pushed me over the edge.
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  #21  
Old 02-21-2013, 11:03 AM
nogoodnamesleft nogoodnamesleft is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by michaelnel View Post
The first 50 are thrown charges (from my RCBS "Competition" powder measure) and the other batch are the same but each one was trickled up to weight using a Hornady Quick Trickle and Gempro 250 scale. Using Titegroup powder as in the ones above.
Did you weigh the RCBS thrown charges too? It would be interesting to know if the RCBS measure was close to your trickled charges.
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  #22  
Old 02-21-2013, 11:18 AM
michaelnel michaelnel is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nogoodnamesleft View Post
Did you weigh the RCBS thrown charges too? It would be interesting to know if the RCBS measure was close to your trickled charges.
I did not weigh the specific thrown charges here. My methodology was for instance if my target was 5.2 grains I would throw three or four into the pan to get the measure "settled" with the measurement, then toss them back in the hopper.

Then throw 10 and repeat these steps until the total of 10 throws was as close as I could get it to 52.0 grains (indicating the average throw to be 5.2 grains).

Then I would weigh a couple of the thrown charges and they would be near 5.2 grains. But if I measured 10 thrown charges they could vary by over 0.1 grain. My buddy's older RCBS measure (over 30 years old, I sold it to him way back then) will often throw charges that vary by .2 to .3 grains.
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  #23  
Old 02-21-2013, 11:23 AM
Gary Wells Gary Wells is offline
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Looking forward to seeing the next testing results.
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  #24  
Old 02-21-2013, 11:38 AM
JimC JimC is offline
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After reading what's been posted, I had to dig out my older model RR.

My old gun club had a large "I" beam cemented into the ground with a flat steel plate welder on top for RR use. It worked great because it was as solid as one could get. I then used 4 6" C-clamps to hold it down.

Like I said, this setup doesn't work as well as my current gun club with only wooden benches. I would love to be able to test some of my loads. I haven't used my RR is several years.


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  #25  
Old 02-21-2013, 12:23 PM
harley45 harley45 is online now
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There was an article in American Handgunner a few years back showing a bench you could build that you parked a car or truck on for stability. Anybody got it?
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