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  #1  
Old 09-09-2012, 04:21 PM
Faulkner Faulkner is offline
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1942 dated .45 ACP ball




When I acquired my USGI 1911A1 recently I was also given a box of 1942 dated ammo. I have been advised the ammo is probably corrosive or mildly corrosive. Not sure what the difference between corrosive and mildly corrosive is (I would suppose it's like pregnant and kinda pregnant?).

My primary question is, I've never used corrosive ammo before, so IF I were to ever shoot this ammo what precautions should I take afterwards with the firearm?

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  #2  
Old 09-09-2012, 04:36 PM
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yankee2500 yankee2500 is offline
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It may have value to a collector and allow you to buy new ammo by selling it.

If you were to shoot it you would want to do a complete and thorough cleaning and lube.
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  #3  
Old 09-09-2012, 05:03 PM
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dsk dsk is offline
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"Mildly corrosive" means the primers have corrosive compounds in it, as opposed to stuff that uses corrosive smokeless powder as well. Nonetheless this stuff WILL cause rust so make sure you clean the weapon out thoroughly with hot soap and water, or else a bore cleaner using ammonia. Oil well afterwards and you should be okay.

I will agree with yankee2500 however that its value as a collectible is starting to outweigh its utility as range ammo, especially if it is still in the original box.
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  #4  
Old 09-09-2012, 06:39 PM
Yuk Yuk is offline
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Are you able to take any photos from various angles to show us what the box looks like?
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Old 09-09-2012, 07:14 PM
Faulkner Faulkner is offline
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It's a non-descript brown box with no markings whatsoever.

It sounds like it's more trouble than it's worth to shoot it. I may hang on to it, or maybe use it as trading fodder to someone who is into collecting ventage ammo.
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Old 09-09-2012, 07:20 PM
Earlsbud Earlsbud is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Faulkner View Post
It's a non-descript brown box with no markings whatsoever.

It sounds like it's more trouble than it's worth to shoot it. I may hang on to it, or maybe use it as trading fodder to someone who is into collecting ventage ammo.
Good move!
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  #7  
Old 09-09-2012, 07:29 PM
johnfritz johnfritz is offline
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Use lots of Windex on your gun afterwards if you shoot that stuff.
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  #8  
Old 09-09-2012, 07:34 PM
Jim Watson Jim Watson is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dsk View Post
"Mildly corrosive" means the primers have corrosive compounds in it, as opposed to stuff that uses corrosive smokeless powder as well. Nonetheless this stuff WILL cause rust so make sure you clean the weapon out thoroughly with hot soap and water, or else a bore cleaner using ammonia. Oil well afterwards and you should be okay.
.
That's a new one on me.
I have not heard of "corrosive smokeless powder" before.
I have heard of EROSIVE smokeless powder like Pyro DG and Cordite, but not corrosive in the sense of actually promoting rust like the chloride residue from a chlorate primer.
Can you name a few "corrosive smokeless powders?"

Best I can tell, "mildly corrosive" is advertising drivel to sell mostly foreign ammunition with definitely corrosive chlorate primers to gullible Americans.
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  #9  
Old 09-10-2012, 10:24 AM
ClarkEMyers ClarkEMyers is online now
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It's certainly corrosive

IIRC and I may not there were some less corrosive primers tried during the changeover period (much later) but as noted that's purely a talking point not a practical difference. There were differences in quantity and dilution of the salts depending on cartridge and load but again a talking point not a practical difference.

RA 42 missed noncorrosive by about 10 years
Quote:
Type: .45 ACP Ball
Lot Number: 5544
Date: September 1952
First SAFE Headstamp: RA 53
Again IIRC for Frankford Arsenal (original not the maker of the late lamented Vibra Tek primer tube loader) first non-corrosive by records not by test
Quote:
Type: .45 ACP Ball
Lot Number: 1542
Date: July 1954
First SAFE headstamp:
FA 55
In general my own thinking is treat as black powder where for convenience I may use a Water Pik and such. This is the sort of the thing a Boresnake does well I think but wash the Boresnake. Mostly I detail strip especially including firing pin and extractor tunnels and boil in a solution of dishwashing soap, rinse and relube as quickly as I can.

Last edited by ClarkEMyers; 09-10-2012 at 10:31 AM.
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  #10  
Old 09-10-2012, 10:29 AM
Texasflyboy Texasflyboy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Watson View Post
That's a new one on me.
I have not heard of "corrosive smokeless powder" before.
I have heard of EROSIVE smokeless powder like Pyro DG and Cordite, but not corrosive in the sense of actually promoting rust like the chloride residue from a chlorate primer.
Can you name a few "corrosive smokeless powders?"

Best I can tell, "mildly corrosive" is advertising drivel to sell mostly foreign ammunition with definitely corrosive chlorate primers to gullible Americans.
I think its a misplaced thought. The only corrosive powder in common use is Black Powder.

But as others have pointed out, for modern 20th and 21st century ammunition manufactured with modern smokeless powders, the choices for priming were Lead Stypnate (Non Corrosive) and Potassium Chlorate priming (corrosive when fired as the resulting action left Potassium Chloride Salts).

Those FA 42 rounds were primed with the Potassium Chlorate priming mixture and therefore are "corrosively primed" in modern vernacular.

There is no such thing as "slightly" corrosive. Chemistry is a science, not a guessing or naming game.

You either use a chemical priming mixture that leaves corrosive residue or not.

Period.

The use of "slightly corrosive" in advertising is an intelligence test by the seller.

Last edited by Texasflyboy; 09-10-2012 at 10:32 AM.
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  #11  
Old 09-10-2012, 01:11 PM
1saxman 1saxman is online now
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RA = Remington Arms. A 20-rd box looks like this. I tried to sell this box and some others earlier this year, including 1967 military match, and evidently there is really no market for it (I shot the match ammo and it was worth it to see my MK IV/Series '70 shoot up a 6" circle at 15 yds, rapid fire). I suggest you keep it in good condition for some time to come. One problem is the USPS no longer allows ammo to be mailed, so you have to go UPS, which is not cost-effective on small lots. You probably could get $25 for it at a gun show, but once you figure your fuel and admission, you might break even. I'd say keep it as a display accessory for the pistol.

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  #12  
Old 09-10-2012, 05:07 PM
k_dawg k_dawg is offline
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Ammonia is the common household compound to neutralize the corrosive chlorate primer residue.

A ammonia based glass cleaner is often used as its cheap, easy to obtain and is around the right concentration to not cause its own problems. Generally you want to neutralize it immediately after shooting it. This does not preclude the requirement to clean it well however.
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  #13  
Old 09-10-2012, 06:28 PM
grendelbane grendelbane is offline
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I have shot lots of corrosive primed ammunition over the years, and the cleaning process is quite simple.

Hot soapy water, and lots of it. Clean it out. Now, soap isn't as popular today as it was in the 19th and early 20th century, but Dawn dishwashing detergent will do just as well. Flush with hot water, flush with hot boiling water. Allow to dry, (which will take a few seconds).

Now you may clean with the bore cleaner of your choice. No muss, no fuss, no Windex, (which doesn't contain ammonia, and ammonia does nothing to remove potassium chloride residue anyway).

Now, wasn't that simple? Auto pistols are well suited for the hot water flush, as they can be stripped and cleaned so easily.
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  #14  
Old 09-11-2012, 02:14 AM
mikeshan1911 mikeshan1911 is offline
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Any reason you can't just clean your gun like you normally would?
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  #15  
Old 09-11-2012, 11:50 AM
Yuk Yuk is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeshan1911 View Post
Any reason you can't just clean your gun like you normally would?
My question exactly?!

I'm shooting Chinese Norinco ammo in my Colt. The boxes say quite clearly "non-corrosive, non-mercuric primers", but I still have a nervous feeling (no proof) that that may not be the case. I've just been cleaning the gun really well with G96 Gun Treatment. Shouldn't that be enough?

BTW, The Norinco ammo seems to work really well in this gun. No less accurate than any other name brand ammo I've used and after 300 rounds I've had no failures of any kind.
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  #16  
Old 09-11-2012, 01:15 PM
HALAX HALAX is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeshan1911 View Post
Any reason you can't just clean your gun like you normally would?
For corrosively primed ammo, yes. Even with a very thorough cleaning there is the risk of leaving behind small traces the KCl produced by the combustion of the KClO3 priming compound. These traces have the ability to attract and hold atmospheric moisture (it is hygroscopic) that will result in damage to your gun.

Water, and lots of it, is your friend. It's all about removal and dilution. Just make sure you dry the gun well afterwards.
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Last edited by HALAX; 09-11-2012 at 01:21 PM.
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