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  #1  
Old 06-14-2012, 09:25 PM
johnnnyk johnnnyk is offline
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Question about "MADE IN GERMANY" stamp on Luger




I know - I know, this should be posted on a "Luger" forum for max feedback, but I thought some 1911 guys might know this one.
Currently I am waiting for a part for a 1916 Dated Luger to get it back to full functioning condition. Just needs a magazine catch spring.
The gun is in probably "Good" condition overall with the biggest drawback being that the stocks are now black in color, probably due to being soaked with oil since 1916. They do match the ser. no. of the gun.
Not familiar with Lugers in the least, but everything I've seen on various sites makes no mention of the stamping on the left side just above the takedown lever - just short of 1/8" tall in capitol letters: "MADE IN GERMANY".
any idea what this signifies? I'm thinking that the gun was exported, thus the stamping but does anyone know for sure? And... how might this effect the worth of the piece?
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Old 06-14-2012, 10:48 PM
tx_oil tx_oil is offline
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What that means is that your gun was made as a "Commercial" model, in other words NOT as a military or a police version, and was stamped with the GERMANY mark because it was to be imported to the US. Does your extractor say "Loaded" or "Geladen"? If it was not messed with the extractor should say "Loaded" (in English), and your safety should say "Safe" rather than "geisercht" It will also carry the Imperial stamps for the manufacturer (Erfurt, DWM, etc) but NOT the waffenamt or military acceptance stamps.
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  #3  
Old 06-14-2012, 11:39 PM
153 153 is offline
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It's likely a 1920 Commercial Model, a large number of WW1 surplus pistols were reworked, sold and shipped everywhere. It's probably the most common type of "Luger". Value is largely dependent on condition, this stamp doesn't mean much in the long run.
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Old 06-15-2012, 04:37 PM
johnnnyk johnnnyk is offline
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I guess this example is an oddity... both the extractor and the safety are in German. And I don't see a manufacturers mark on it anywhere.
Thanks for the info!
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  #5  
Old 06-15-2012, 04:48 PM
GT40DOC GT40DOC is offline
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The manufacturer mark will be on the top of the toggle assembly, if it has one. It will be letters(DWM, Erfurt, etc), or it will be letters and numbers, or just numbers. There are some very good/proper cleaning methods for your grips if you are interested. You can go to the Luger forum, and they have a sticky for that.

As mentioned above, since your Luger is marked "Germany" it was produced for export. Is it a numbers matching pistol, or is it a parts gun? Many of the parts of a Luger have serial numbers on them, or just the last 2 numbers of the serial number. If it is numbers matching everywhere, then it could be worth a fair amount of money, depending on condition. If it is mismatched, then it is just a shooter, and demands less of a price. Do not be alarmed that your safety and extractor are marked in German as that is most common.
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  #6  
Old 06-15-2012, 04:56 PM
tx_oil tx_oil is offline
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Perhaps an arsenal rework..i.e., a mutt. Commercial export marked frame, Toggle and barrel assembly (or 'cannon') from an Imperial or Weimer era pistol.
The '1920' chamber stamp is NOT a date, it was a property mark--Lugers with that stamp were marked as property of the (Weimer) Republic, and lots of earlier guns were double stamped.
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  #7  
Old 06-15-2012, 08:31 PM
1saxman 1saxman is offline
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You're not getting the whole story. I suggest you go to the Luger Forum and do some reading. The Luger just happens to be the most involved pistol to decode and collect.

http://www.lugerforum.com/
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  #8  
Old 06-16-2012, 06:48 AM
pyunker45 pyunker45 is offline
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I don't get why there are so many threads like this that do not include pics? Everything is a big guess without pics.
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  #9  
Old 06-16-2012, 04:50 PM
GT40DOC GT40DOC is offline
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He made it over to the Luger Forum and got a lot of information concerning his friend's Luger. He did post pictures over there as it is nearly impossible to determine much of anything about the pistol without pictures.
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