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  #1  
Old 06-12-2012, 12:38 PM
Swan_King Swan_King is offline
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Polish before Cerakote?




I would like something durable for my CCW Commander-style project. I am leaning toward Cerakote, but in searching this and other forums I can't find an answer to the prep. Does the frame/slide have to be media blasted for the finish to hold?

I ask because I'm not particularly wanting a completely matte finish. If I polish the slide flats somewhat, will it lend a different texture to that area rather than the matte rounds? Or will the finish look the same over the whole piece not matter what I do?

Thanks for the info.
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  #2  
Old 06-12-2012, 12:45 PM
log man log man is offline
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All finishes have their limits. Hot bluing will allow for a variation in surface and blue exactly the same as the prep finish, matte will be matte, and polish will be polished. Cerakote needs bite and Alox blast is pretty much mandatory for satisfactory results.

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  #3  
Old 06-12-2012, 01:24 PM
spoolie spoolie is offline
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Always bead blast before coating.
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  #4  
Old 06-12-2012, 01:40 PM
Swan_King Swan_King is offline
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I assumed as much, since it is more of a 'paint' rather than something which changes the metal. Why can't these choices be easier? Or rather, why can't I have a polished blue which won't scratch and stands up to a lot of use?
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  #5  
Old 06-12-2012, 01:41 PM
spoolie spoolie is offline
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That would be an awesome invention!
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  #6  
Old 06-12-2012, 01:52 PM
kc87flhtc kc87flhtc is offline
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You could get that with Ion Bond. It wouldn't be as highly polished as a polished blue, but there would be a nice contrast between the polished and blasted surfaces. And Ion Bond is about as bullet proof as you can get.
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  #7  
Old 06-12-2012, 02:09 PM
Swan_King Swan_King is offline
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While I'm familiar with the Ionbond/Nitron Sig finishes, I had dismissed them for the typical gray, chalk-like appearance I have sometimes seen. However, on another thread I just viewed a pic of a slide with that finish where the flats were polished. Didn't look too bad, at all.
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  #8  
Old 06-12-2012, 03:28 PM
Jdoming728 Jdoming728 is offline
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I always park then dura cote on top but you should bead blast before applying any cote.
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  #9  
Old 06-12-2012, 05:21 PM
spoolie spoolie is offline
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Just Cerakoted this frame WWII OD. It works much better with a scuffed surface, it will also work with a smooth surface too.

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  #10  
Old 06-12-2012, 08:04 PM
dfariswheel dfariswheel is offline
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You always get better adhesion with a bead blasted surface.
The micro-rough surface gives the coating a "tooth" to bond to.
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  #11  
Old 06-12-2012, 09:48 PM
michaelgee michaelgee is offline
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Always bead blast/ but if you are going to cerrakote use gloves and do not EVER let your fingers touch the blasted surfaces before painting. Just keep the fingerprints off and you will be good to go. If you touch the blasted surfaces with your fingers and don't get an adverse reaction in your finish you were just lucky.
Cerrakote or which ever finish you use will need something to bond to so it can adhere properly.
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Last edited by michaelgee; 06-12-2012 at 09:53 PM.
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  #12  
Old 06-12-2012, 09:58 PM
AlchemyCustom AlchemyCustom is offline
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NIC Industries specifically warns against bead blasting. Specifically use 120 grit Aluminum Oxide for prepping parts to be Cerakoted. Bead blasting does not etch the surface. It merely dents the surface of the metal.

Finish appearance can be adjusted by varying the amount of hardener used in the mix. This is assuming that you are using the oven cure finish.
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  #13  
Old 06-12-2012, 10:32 PM
michaelgee michaelgee is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlchemyCustom View Post
NIC Industries specifically warns against bead blasting. Specifically use 120 grit Aluminum Oxide for prepping parts to be Cerakoted. Bead blasting does not etch the surface. It merely dents the surface of the metal.

Finish appearance can be adjusted by varying the amount of hardener used in the mix. This is assuming that you are using the oven cure finish.
I only use glass beading media.
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  #14  
Old 06-13-2012, 07:18 AM
spoolie spoolie is offline
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Glass beads have worked for me for 8 yrs...
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  #15  
Old 06-13-2012, 07:29 AM
jr45acp jr45acp is offline
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I had a phone conversation with Duracoat and they DID NOT recommend bead blasting. Rather their suggestion was sand blasting and the techie I spoke with said that even play ground sand was ok.
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  #16  
Old 06-13-2012, 07:44 AM
blr blr is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlchemyCustom View Post
NIC Industries specifically warns against bead blasting. Specifically use 120 grit Aluminum Oxide for prepping parts to be Cerakoted. Bead blasting does not etch the surface. It merely dents the surface of the metal.

Finish appearance can be adjusted by varying the amount of hardener used in the mix. This is assuming that you are using the oven cure finish.
Very true.

This is the difference between a good Cerakote shop and a bad one. Like AC said, media, mix ratio and temperature are all important with Cerakote. The same can be said of any polymer cured finish.
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  #17  
Old 06-13-2012, 12:33 PM
michaelgee michaelgee is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jr45acp View Post
I had a phone conversation with Duracoat and they DID NOT recommend bead blasting. Rather their suggestion was sand blasting and the techie I spoke with said that even play ground sand was ok.
To remove paint as on a pre 70 series Colt LW Commander, I have also used Playground Sand from Lowes. I have a fine mesh screen that I filter out anything large before getting it near my frames. There may always be a few larger gran pieces, a fine mesh will extract that from a 50lb bag really fast. I actually found a very few tiny rocks that I doubt would have passed thru the nozzle.

Just throwing in my .02 worth in things I have found occasionally.
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  #18  
Old 06-13-2012, 04:08 PM
spoolie spoolie is offline
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Guess I'm lucky...or correct. Never had 1 come back in 8 yrs of coating weapons. My carry weapon is in Kydex, and has been for 5 yrs...still looks like new.
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  #19  
Old 06-13-2012, 04:14 PM
Topher Topher is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jr45acp View Post
...and the techie I spoke with said that even play ground sand was ok.
DO NOT USE PLAYGROUND SAND TO BLAST!!!

Playground sand has (if I'm remembering right, stupid addled brain!) silicone or a derivitave thereof and when atomized is toxic as hell. Like, very very bad. Moderate exposure is pretty dangerous. I do a little bodywork as another hobby and although it is cheap and abundant, it is quite dangerous.

That is all. Back to the regularly scheduled programming.

C
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  #20  
Old 06-14-2012, 01:07 AM
deadly0311 deadly0311 is offline
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Your best bet is to run 120 or 150 grit ALOX....I have tried bead blasting, playground sand, and a host of other blast media and nothing holds up like ALOX.
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  #21  
Old 06-14-2012, 07:41 AM
Jdoming728 Jdoming728 is offline
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I agreed Alox. Works well, I build a lot of AK, I blast then keen and clean with brake cleaner, then usually park, then dura cote, always wearing gloves no skin contact. I also like to heat up the metal before spraying then bake or since I have a lot of solar glass, I leave it there for three days or more,,,I have not had any of my guns peel yet.
Only exception is the AK safety lever kiss in the frame.
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  #22  
Old 06-23-2012, 11:23 PM
fungun40 fungun40 is offline
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I use 120 grit aluminum oxide for "sand blasting". The "shine" or matte finish in cerakote comes from the amount of hardener to paint you put in so the prep has nothing to do with that. A gloss finish will have 1-18 mix and a matte will have 1-24. The matte finish looks good but it truly holds onto everything. I did a 1911 with a matte tan slide and I can see the dirt from my hands just from racking the slide on reloads. I would suggest matte on a shotgun with dark colors but nothing that is going to rub and be touched a lot. It feels like 600 grit sandpaper.

Last edited by fungun40; 06-23-2012 at 11:39 PM.
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