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  #1  
Old 04-27-2012, 11:35 PM
Capt. Methane Capt. Methane is online now
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M 66 trigger question...




I love the M-66 that I picked up for my wife but it was a gunbroker internet deal and I didn't realize that it lacked the serrated trigger...hey, my bad-now I just have to fix it!

Is there anything special that I should know about changing the trigger out and where is the best place to look for one?

Thanks in advance...
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Old 04-28-2012, 04:31 AM
nosreme nosreme is offline
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1 - If you don't know what you're doing, good gunsmiths do and are undoubtedly the safest and best route, or...

2 - If you do, the S&W forum gunsmithing subforum is loaded with experts' take on a huge variety of topics; you might find something there: < http://smith-wessonforum.com/s-w-smithing/ >
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Last edited by nosreme; 04-28-2012 at 06:52 AM.
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Old 04-28-2012, 08:02 AM
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RetiredRod RetiredRod is offline
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Are you sure you want a serrated trigger. Many good shooters prefer the smooth trigger for ease of double-action shooting. I'd take a smooth one over a serrated one every time.
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Old 04-28-2012, 09:57 AM
FN in MT FN in MT is offline
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Not every local Smith truly knows how to work on S&W or especially Colt revolvers like they did 20 or 30 years ago. Those early M-66 serrated trigger don't exactly grow on trees. Early S&W hammers and trigger will run a minimum of $50 each simply to purchase...if not more. Then finding a smith to PROPERLY install...yet another issue.

I would call S&W . Have the model # with dash #, and the serial handy. See if they could install the serrated trigger.

If it's a later MIM model a bit easier....but again send it in to S&W.
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Old 04-28-2012, 11:05 AM
Pizza Bob Pizza Bob is offline
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I vote for smooth. I like it better for D/A and for S/A it really doesn't much matter.
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Old 04-28-2012, 01:43 PM
nosreme nosreme is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FN in MT View Post
I would call S&W . Have the model # with dash #, and the serial handy. See if they could install the serrated trigger.
Excellent point I should have thought of above but probably didn't because my gunsmith here is really good on older S&W revolvers. I did send my 60+ year-old pre-27 to S&W because it was much older than my others and to see what kind of work they did. They returned it quickly and the cost was very reasonable. Most importantly, it shoots spectacularly. The trigger is Python-smooth in both DA and SA, and it's dead-on accurate. After the S&W gunsmith got it, he asked what kind of trigger I wanted. (When I called about sending it in, they asked if it was old. I said yes, about 60-64 years. The response was, "That isn't old.")
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Old 04-28-2012, 06:57 PM
Mr.JoyBoy Mr.JoyBoy is offline
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Capt,
What about screwing on a serrated trigger shoe ? I put one on my 64 and I prefer the wide feel it gives.
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Old 04-28-2012, 07:01 PM
supervel supervel is offline
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Most people myself incuded seem to prefer the smooth triggered Smith. With that being said you can find plenty of groved ones on GB or Ebay. They are easy to install and I have never heard of one going FA by a home trigger job. They can be made too light though.Teddy Jakeonbson at ACTIONS BY T in Sugar land Texas near Houston is one of the best DA smith's in the South if not Country.

Last edited by supervel; 04-28-2012 at 07:06 PM.
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Old 04-29-2012, 01:39 PM
jbg56 jbg56 is offline
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Ever rapid fire a revolver with a serrated trigger? It isn't pleasant.
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Old 05-01-2012, 07:56 PM
Capt. Methane Capt. Methane is online now
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Hey, thanks for the input-honestly, the closest thing I've done to rapid fire with a revolver is with a smooth triggered snubby and those things are kind of unpleasant to shoot anyway-not something one would want to spend all afternoon doing.

I'm not that good doing the DA thing...so mostly I don't except with the snubby cause I carry it sometimes and I figure that's how it would end up getting used.

I'll give it a try with the other two and re-evaluate...
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Old 05-06-2012, 11:14 AM
ColColt ColColt is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RetiredRod View Post
Are you sure you want a serrated trigger. Many good shooters prefer the smooth trigger for ease of double-action shooting. I'd take a smooth one over a serrated one every time.
Ditto-I can attest it's a bit painful, depending on caliber and load, to rapid fire with a serrated trigger. I vote for the combat trigger.
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Old 05-07-2012, 06:23 AM
Capt. Methane Capt. Methane is online now
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This is interesting...I have done most of my revolver shooting in SA with a DA revolver in .41 Mag that has a serrated trigger-it's been a big target pistol essentially-not that I'm really good with it but that's how I've shot it-I don't ever remember emptying the cylinder DA.

My 1911's are Single Action and have serrated triggers...

Now the 66 is a lot lighter than the 57 but I've got some moderate loads built for both of them and will try shooting them both in DA.

I'm seeing the logic of the smooth trigger for a close range emptying of a cylinder in a combat situation taking advantage of the DA feature. It's going to be a while before I get home in the middle part of the month but I'll let you know...
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Old 05-07-2012, 07:46 AM
BHP9 BHP9 is offline
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To Capt.Methane:

What is the gun going to be used for?

Will the gun go in a holster? If yes, do not use a trigger shoe.

Everyone I know had their serrated trigger smoothed out.

The trigger isn't just a dropin unit, it has to be mated to the sear and possibly the sear may need replacing too.

I've seen replacement trigger o GunBroker for $75 and they may or may not have been serrated.
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Old 05-07-2012, 08:45 AM
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Ricky T Ricky T is offline
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Original poster:

You need to rethink your need for serrated trigger.

Like others have pointed out, smooth trigger is much more desireable for double action.

If the gun is for self defense, smooth trigger is desired. If it is for self defense, you should seriously reconsider shooting the gun in single action mode. This is not the thread to discuss the legal and practical issues of NOT using the single action trigger mode for self defense. In short, you're setting yourself up for failure. Learn how to properly shoot the double action trigger.

The single action mode should be left mainly for trying to win trophy or hunting. In that case, you do need serrated trigger.
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