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  #1  
Old 04-25-2012, 11:27 PM
playmen playmen is offline
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Colt .380 Mustang Pocketlite new vs. old version




I own the old version of the Colt .380 Mustang Pocketlite. Colt recently announced a new/updated version of this handgun (http://www.coltsmfg.com/Catalog/Colt...ocketlite.aspx). Does anyone have any experience with both the old and new versions? Are they basically the same? In the various reviews online, Colt claims that the new version is improved with more precise manufacturing.

For me everything boils down to this - should I upgrade to the new version or keep my old gun which is performing great btw?
I have the feeling that I can get more $ for my old Mustang Pocketlite, buy the new (and better?) version and have some cash to burn on the range.

Any thoughts, suggestions, opinions are appreciated (first time poster here).

Thanks!

Last edited by playmen; 04-25-2012 at 11:32 PM.
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  #2  
Old 04-26-2012, 12:42 PM
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dsk dsk is offline
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My understanding is that they are identical except for the trigger now being made of alloy instead of plastic. The issue with the older Colts is that their QC was erratic, but if yours works great then you got one of the better ones, and you should keep it.

BTW I'm moving this to the Colt section since there seems to be more discussion on Mustangs here than in General Discussion.
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Last edited by dsk; 04-26-2012 at 12:44 PM.
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  #3  
Old 04-26-2012, 03:41 PM
playmen playmen is offline
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Thanks, sorry for the wrong thread, I am new here.
I have not experienced any problems, but then again I do not shoot a lot with it.

Btw, I just read your footer line... it kinds of confirms your answer
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  #4  
Old 04-26-2012, 03:45 PM
BJT72 BJT72 is offline
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The new Mustang has been improved in a number of ways over the older model. The older Mustangs were made from cast parts. The new Mustangs are cut from forged bar stock. Lock up, some geometry, overall tolerances and trigger shoe matierial have all been improved.
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  #5  
Old 04-26-2012, 04:05 PM
MAGAZAGU MAGAZAGU is offline
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Roger on the QC and plastic trigger (and one or two other plastic parts as I recall)

Got rid of mine for those very reasons. I'd prefer the new Mustang with a blue steel frame in place of "lightweight" now being made. The Colt 380s are in short supply and thus often sell at over list price........which is not inexpensive.

Overall they are a solid design, flat and easy to conceal.
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  #6  
Old 04-26-2012, 09:34 PM
Dangerous Dangerous is offline
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I wish they brought the .380 Government model back as well.
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  #7  
Old 04-27-2012, 12:23 AM
KyJim KyJim is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BJT72 View Post
The new Mustang has been improved in a number of ways over the older model. The older Mustangs were made from cast parts. The new Mustangs are cut from forged bar stock. Lock up, some geometry, overall tolerances and trigger shoe matierial have all been improved.
Brent
That's good to know. I have one of the older ones and have had no problems but I had just about decided to pass on the new one. Your post has me re-thinking this.
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  #8  
Old 04-27-2012, 12:28 AM
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The one and only time I had a chance to look at a new one I didn't notice a difference with the quality of build, but it is good to know that the cast parts are a thing of the past. I had a STS Pocketlite many years ago, but eventually got rid of it because either the hammer or sear was too soft, causing a horrible trigger pull despite help from a gunsmith.
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  #9  
Old 04-27-2012, 12:34 AM
jlaudio29 jlaudio29 is offline
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Not sure if this information is useful to the subject but...

Colt sold there tooling for the Mustang to Sig, as a result sig started to produce the Sig P238, which is based on the mustang platform, what they did with the tooling after they got it i do not know, but they got it, and obviously make a few milling changes to the slide adding there signature slide cuts etc.

So, the tooling that has been done for the new Colt mustang is brand new, which to me could indicate tighter tolerances and corrections being made to any old errors that were in the old toolings.

The old ones are still seeming to hold value, i had a chance to snag an older version for a steel at $400 back in Nov of last year. I wanted one so bad, but just could not justify spending that cash on it. If i had gotten more holster orders for them id probably have bought it as a business investment.

If you have an older one and it hasnt let you down yet, then i fall back on.. if it aint broke dont fix it. The newer ones are harder to find so they are fetching a fair value for them.
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  #10  
Old 04-27-2012, 12:42 AM
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I believe Brett once told us that SIG in fact did not buy Colt's old tooling for the Mustang.
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Try not to fall into the common trap of wanting to replace everything on your new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out, and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot it for at least 500 rounds, then decide what you don't like and want improved. Vintage 1911's should NEVER be refinished or modified because it ruins any value they had as a collectible firearm.
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  #11  
Old 04-27-2012, 05:13 AM
BJT72 BJT72 is offline
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Sig did not buy anything from us, no tooling, no blueprints, nothing. They made a close copy that's it.
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  #12  
Old 04-27-2012, 06:31 AM
pyunker45 pyunker45 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BJT72 View Post
Sig did not buy anything from us, no tooling, no blueprints, nothing. They made a close copy that's it.
Brent
I sure do appreciate your giving the facts on this. Thanks!

If one reads different forums long enough, one would think Colt has sold EVERY piece of equipment and has huge caverns of empty space at the factory! .... Which I believe you said wasn't true on another forum.
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  #13  
Old 04-27-2012, 11:46 AM
jlaudio29 jlaudio29 is offline
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Wow, thank you for the correction, Im so sorry for posting it, I have heard this from Several friends in the industry, not just on a whim from some post and took it as gospel. I will have to inform them as well that the information is incorrect.

Really apologize for the bad information.
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  #14  
Old 04-27-2012, 01:27 PM
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dsk dsk is offline
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That BS has been floating around on the errornet for some time, so you're forgiven.
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Try not to fall into the common trap of wanting to replace everything on your new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out, and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot it for at least 500 rounds, then decide what you don't like and want improved. Vintage 1911's should NEVER be refinished or modified because it ruins any value they had as a collectible firearm.
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  #15  
Old 04-27-2012, 03:03 PM
BJT72 BJT72 is offline
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No harm done, just a silly rumor that has been floating around for a while. There are lots of them....
Brent
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  #16  
Old 04-27-2012, 03:41 PM
Civil 45 Civil 45 is offline
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Not to disagree with you Brent but it’s not a close copy (operationally maybe). I "owned" the so called copy and when you hold it next to a Mustang they are MUCH different. The Mustang is noticeably more sleek and compact! I just wish I could get my hands one!
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Last edited by Civil 45; 04-27-2012 at 03:45 PM.
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  #17  
Old 04-27-2012, 09:27 PM
playmen playmen is offline
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I am also not a big fan of jumping to the latest and greatest, but like some of the comments indicated, I can probably get a good price of my old Pocketlite version and buy the new version that is suppose to be slightly improved, (trigger, manufacturing process). Of course I have to wait few months probably, which is ok with me.
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  #18  
Old 04-27-2012, 11:53 PM
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Until more start trickling out of the factory the whole point is moot, anyway.
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Try not to fall into the common trap of wanting to replace everything on your new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out, and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot it for at least 500 rounds, then decide what you don't like and want improved. Vintage 1911's should NEVER be refinished or modified because it ruins any value they had as a collectible firearm.
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  #19  
Old 04-28-2012, 10:34 PM
MAGAZAGU MAGAZAGU is offline
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Have four recent production Colt pistols, 1911, Commanders (2 each) and WWI repro of 1918 purchased in the past few years.

I have been critical of Colt quality for some time but no more. You are paying for much more than the name "Colt". Even my Colt 5.56 rifle and 9mm carbine show superior quality as Colt steps up its game.

Cheaper 1911s are available and my two Springfield Armory 1911 pistols are good quality. They are not up to Colt standards however and, of course, lack long term collector value.

Shoot safely, Jim

Last edited by MAGAZAGU; 04-28-2012 at 10:41 PM.
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  #20  
Old 04-29-2012, 01:36 AM
MuzLvelocity MuzLvelocity is offline
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I've put a few hundreds of rounds though my Mustang Plus II. It's a sweat shooting little gun and has never failed to fire.

Count me as another vote for "If it ain't broke..."
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  #21  
Old 04-29-2012, 10:09 AM
JWnTN JWnTN is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Civil 45 View Post
Not to disagree with you Brent but itís not a close copy (operationally maybe). I "owned" the so called copy and when you hold it next to a Mustang they are MUCH different. The Mustang is noticeably more sleek and compact! I just wish I could get my hands one!
I had not looked at the two pistols enough to tell much difference. A lady that I work with compared the SIG and Colt. She immediately said the Colt was much more 'sexy'.
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  #22  
Old 05-01-2012, 05:15 PM
mr380acp mr380acp is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jlaudio29 View Post
Not sure if this information is useful to the subject but...

Colt sold there tooling for the Mustang to Sig, as a result sig started to produce the Sig P238, which is based on the mustang platform, what they did with the tooling after they got it i do not know, but they got it, and obviously make a few milling changes to the slide adding there signature slide cuts etc.

So, the tooling that has been done for the new Colt mustang is brand new, which to me could indicate tighter tolerances and corrections being made to any old errors that were in the old toolings.

The old ones are still seeming to hold value, i had a chance to snag an older version for a steel at $400 back in Nov of last year. I wanted one so bad, but just could not justify spending that cash on it. If i had gotten more holster orders for them id probably have bought it as a business investment.

If you have an older one and it hasnt let you down yet, then i fall back on.. if it aint broke dont fix it. The newer ones are harder to find so they are fetching a fair value for them.
man i would have been all over that for $400.....they are at least 5-600$ around here
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  #23  
Old 05-01-2012, 10:00 PM
Dogger Dogger is offline
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I had a Sig P238 -- it was unreliable. Local emporium had a new Mustang come in and I snapped it up. 100% reliable. I am very pleased with the new Colt.
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  #24  
Old 05-04-2012, 04:51 PM
zbird zbird is offline
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I also had a sig p238 that was unreliable. I hated to see it go, as it was the most accurate 380 I ever shot.
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  #25  
Old 05-04-2012, 05:27 PM
gorley gorley is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dsk View Post
Until more start trickling out of the factory the whole point is moot, anyway.

No kidding! Noone around here has any idea when one will show up, and I'll be suprised if they're even close to msrp when they do.
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