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  #1  
Old 02-09-2012, 07:38 PM
AlleninGa AlleninGa is offline
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Kimber hammer question




In the manual for my Springfield RO it says you can lower the hammer by holding it with your fingers and pulling the trigger. The manual for my Kimber ultra crimson carry says not to do this as it can mar the sear tip and ruin the trigger pull. What makes this difference in the two guns?
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Old 02-10-2012, 10:02 AM
SRJim SRJim is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlleninGa View Post
In the manual for my Springfield RO it says you can lower the hammer by holding it with your fingers and pulling the trigger. The manual for my Kimber ultra crimson carry says not to do this as it can mar the sear tip and ruin the trigger pull. What makes this difference in the two guns?
They're not the same. Kimber's don't have a half cock, they have a hammer safety that's designed to catch the hammer if something causes it to fall. I don't know if Springfield does the same, but by a different method or not.

As to what each does to the fire controls, I have no idea, but I have a feeling someone will be able to explain at least 1 very soon.
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  #3  
Old 02-10-2012, 06:36 PM
larryh1108 larryh1108 is offline
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I feel that Kimber's triggers are the best production triggers on the 1911 market but that's just my opinion. I feel that's why they discourage that practice. YMMV.
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  #4  
Old 02-10-2012, 07:22 PM
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Kruzr Kruzr is offline
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The difference is one in.......philosophy. If you decock a 1911 by holding the hammer and letting it down (the way jmb intended it for guys on horseback) you can rub the sear nose on the hammer as you drop it. This can affect the engagement surfaces on guns with trigger jobs at 4-5 lb or less. The easiest way to avoid it is to just dry fire the gun.

You can do either with either gun so long as you hold the trigger all the way back and let the hammer down slowly so you don't rub the sear nose.
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Old 02-10-2012, 07:41 PM
AlleninGa AlleninGa is offline
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Thanks for the info guys that answers my question.
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  #6  
Old 02-10-2012, 08:13 PM
KenU KenU is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kruzr View Post
The difference is one in.......philosophy. If you decock a 1911 by holding the hammer and letting it down (the way jmb intended it for guys on horseback) you can rub the sear nose on the hammer as you drop it. This can affect the engagement surfaces on guns with trigger jobs at 4-5 lb or less. The easiest way to avoid it is to just dry fire the gun.

You can do either with either gun so long as you hold the trigger all the way back and let the hammer down slowly so you don't rub the sear nose.
To clarify - it's ok to pull the hammer all the way back (cocked) and dry fire? Just not pull the trigger and manually "help" the hammer back down at the same time? Thanks
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Old 02-10-2012, 09:08 PM
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Kruzr Kruzr is offline
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To clarify - it's ok to pull the hammer all the way back (cocked) and dry fire? Just not pull the trigger and manually "help" the hammer back down at the same time? Thanks
The short answer is yes.

The long answer is you can do it either way but if you don't make sure the sear is completely free of the hammer when you let it down, you can damage the sear nose and there is really no reason to do this.

If the gun is unloaded you just dry fire it. If the gun is loaded and you want to carry it, condition one is the way to do it, cocked and with the thumb safety on. If you must lower the hammer, then clear the gun and then dry fire it.
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  #8  
Old 02-10-2012, 09:27 PM
KenU KenU is offline
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Originally Posted by Kruzr View Post
The short answer is yes.

The long answer is you can do it either way but if you don't make sure the sear is completely free of the hammer when you let it down, you can damage the sear nose and there is really no reason to do this.

If the gun is unloaded you just dry fire it. If the gun is loaded and you want to carry it, condition one is the way to do it, cocked and with the thumb safety on. If you must lower the hammer, then clear the gun and then dry fire it.
Of course, thanks
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