1911Forum
Forum   Reviews   Rules   Legal   Site Supporters & Donations   Advertise


Go Back   1911Forum > 1911 Manufacturers > USGI/Foreign Military and other Vintage 1911s


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 01-22-2012, 07:31 PM
Toothbob Toothbob is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Chattanooga, TN
Posts: 6
USGI 1911 with National Match Parts?




Please excuse my noobness, but I'd appreciate any information you can give me about the 1911 I purchased today.

https://picasaweb.google.com/1024496...eat=directlink

So from what I gather reading the very helpful http://coolgunsite.com/, the gun is an Augusta Armory rebuild, the frame is a Springfield produced in 1916, the Slide is a Colt. Obviously the slide stop, safety, grips, and mag release aren't original. The barrel bushing and barrel are both stamped NM which should mean they are national match parts. The rear sight is a Elliason unit.

So my impression is that this is a 1911 arsenal rebuild that has been modified at some point for target/competition shooting. It's probably not a true national match gun, as its missing a few key markings.

I'm sure I over payed for the gun, but honestly it felt good in my hand, and seems to have a lot of history. Anything else I'm missing?
Attached Thumbnails
IMAG0118.jpg  
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 01-22-2012, 08:03 PM
vette vette is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Western NC
Posts: 1,644
Sounds like you pretty much know what you bought. Not a US assembled NM, as you seem to know.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 01-22-2012, 08:21 PM
Toothbob Toothbob is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Chattanooga, TN
Posts: 6
So would it be reasonable to say these are period modifications for target shooting?
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 01-22-2012, 08:46 PM
dsk's Avatar
dsk dsk is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Posts: 43,043
Yes, but the problem is they could have been added by anybody. Accurizing .45's like this for NRA Service Pistol matches was big business from the 1950's through 1970's, and everybody was getting into the act from certified gunsmiths to kitchen-table wanna-bes.
__________________
Try not to fall into the common trap of wanting to replace everything on your new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out, and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot it for at least 500 rounds, then decide what you don't like and want improved. Vintage 1911's should NEVER be refinished or modified because it ruins any value they had as a collectible firearm.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 01-22-2012, 08:49 PM
Lyman Lyman is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Beach Va
Posts: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toothbob View Post
So would it be reasonable to say these are period modifications for target shooting?
Question is, what period? I would guess probably 60's or maybe later going by the barrel
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 01-23-2012, 07:55 AM
Toothbob Toothbob is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Chattanooga, TN
Posts: 6
The only thing that I really don't like about the gun is the grip that has been added under the trigger on the frame. It's darn sharp! Is there any easy way to reverse or tone that down?
That, and the flashy chrome stuff needs to go...
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 01-23-2012, 05:56 PM
JoeMiner JoeMiner is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Western Missouri
Posts: 422
I like the high polish reflective trigger with the shoe. It adds a little 70s style.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 01-24-2012, 06:00 PM
WiseguyThreeOne WiseguyThreeOne is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Fort Campbell, KY metro area
Posts: 983
Toothbob, that stippled finish is done by going after the frame of the pistol with a centerpunch. It's pretty much a lost art in the age of machine-cut checkering, but in the 1960s and 1970s it was the height of cool. I think Nighthawk listed it as an option a couple years ago since they bragged one of their smiths did it, but you won't see it in the catalogs from any of the "name" shops.

I've seen some GI NM pistols with some very basic centerpunch work, basically a grid of dents, but this layered 3-D finish takes time and was often done by the shooter or the shooter's buddy who knew how.

This looks somewhat similar in concept to my friend's pistol that he inherited. His dad was NCOIC of one of the Army pistol teams back in the 1970s, and got his hands on an extensively modified pre-war Colt National Match. The stippling, the trigger shoe, the adjustable sight added on...very similar. There were two stippled GI mainspring housings with his, one arched and one serrated. All definitely looked like they'd been done by the same hand.

I can say, having shot my buddy's, that the stippling is still a very valid choice for a metal-framed pistol. Won't tear up your hands like 20LPI, abrade your gloves like 30LPI, and still gives your hands better purchase on the gun than just a standard "slick" front strap.
__________________
"Ain't too many things in life
You can't fix
With seven hundred dollars
And a thirty ought six."
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 01-24-2012, 07:44 PM
Toothbob Toothbob is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Chattanooga, TN
Posts: 6
What I don't like about his modification is that the points are really sharp. I can't see shooting this without gloves as is. Maybe a little fine filing to knock down the edges just a touch...
Attached Thumbnails
IMAG0127.jpg  
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 01-25-2012, 07:36 PM
MichiganTim MichiganTim is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 44
There is a nearly identically modified gun sitting in the used case at Gander Mountain in Lansing, Michigan. Same grips, similar sights, same cheesy stippling, same trigger, frame 1918, arsenal markings. $1,600.
Attached Thumbnails
colt2.jpg  
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 01-25-2012, 09:34 PM
Toothbob Toothbob is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Chattanooga, TN
Posts: 6
Well that makes me feel better about spending $800 on it
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 01-26-2012, 03:51 AM
WiseguyThreeOne WiseguyThreeOne is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Fort Campbell, KY metro area
Posts: 983
Tooth, the stippling on my buddy's dad's pistol doesn't have a snag or a sharp point anywhere. It's masterfully done, and provides a wonderful non-abrasive grip surface. Yours is a good start point, but if someone knew what they were doing, it could be layered upon.
__________________
"Ain't too many things in life
You can't fix
With seven hundred dollars
And a thirty ought six."
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 01-26-2012, 05:00 AM
rox15636215 rox15636215 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: NJ
Posts: 1,020
Nice find

I have a 1917, Clark Custom. Same as yours and one of my most accurate.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:25 AM.


NOTICE TO USERS OF THIS SITE: By continuing to use this site, you certify that you have read and agree to abide by the Legal Terms of Use. All information, data, text or other materials ("Content") posted to this site by any users are the sole responsibility of those users. 1911Forum does not guarantee the accuracy, integrity, or quality of such Content.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright 2011 1911Forum.com, LLC. All Rights Reserved