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  #1  
Old 11-21-2011, 06:57 PM
unclebsd unclebsd is offline
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1 lb of powder = how many bullets?




just wondering if someone can give me a ballpark guess on how many rounds 1 pound of powder will make?
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  #2  
Old 11-21-2011, 07:01 PM
Wrightturn Wrightturn is offline
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Shots per pound

One pound = 7,000 grains. Pick your load and divide.
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  #3  
Old 11-21-2011, 07:06 PM
RH45 RH45 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wrightturn View Post
One pound = 7,000 grains. Pick your load and divide.
I know that there is SUPPOSED to be 7,000 grains in a pound, but, I've found that there seems to be considerably less in a 1 pound container.
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  #4  
Old 11-21-2011, 07:07 PM
unclebsd unclebsd is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wrightturn View Post
One pound = 7,000 grains. Pick your load and divide.
so with 230 gr. that'd be 7000 / 230 = 30.43

that means it will only make 30 rounds?
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  #5  
Old 11-21-2011, 07:09 PM
Jim Watson Jim Watson is offline
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Powder density varies.
Trail Boss is so bulky that a "one pound" container is used to ship 9 oz.
I have some 700X cans that delivered 8 oz in a can that would hold a pound of 4895, and you get 14 oz of Clays in a standard plastic jar used for a pound of rifle powder.

It is on the label.
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  #6  
Old 11-21-2011, 07:11 PM
Jim Watson Jim Watson is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by unclebsd View Post
so with 230 gr. that'd be 7000 / 230 = 30.43

that means it will only make 30 rounds?
You using 230 grains of powder in your ammo?
What, .50 BMG or 20mm?

A .45 ACP with 230 gr BULLET is loaded with maybe 5 grains of POWDER.
So if you cast your own bullets, yes, you get 30 out of a pound of LEAD.
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  #7  
Old 11-21-2011, 07:12 PM
Catfishsteve Catfishsteve is offline
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Powder loads per lb.

Quote:
Originally Posted by unclebsd View Post
so with 230 gr. that'd be 7000 / 230 = 30.43

that means it will only make 30 rounds?
wooops! I think you are going with bullet weight there...we're talking powder charges here.

OK, I'm very, very new to reloading... but let's see, my load is 3.5 grains of whatever powder it is I'm using (pick your powder brand/name and your own load); and 7000 grains of POWDER per lb. so...

7000 divided by 3.5 per load is 2000 loads!!
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  #8  
Old 11-21-2011, 07:12 PM
mike.h mike.h is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by unclebsd View Post
so with 230 gr. that'd be 7000 / 230 = 30.43

that means it will only make 30 rounds?
No, the 230 refers to the the bullet weight, you will only be using 3.5 to 6.g of powder per.

here's a calculator : http://handloads.com/calc/loadingCosts.asp
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  #9  
Old 11-21-2011, 07:13 PM
unclebsd unclebsd is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Watson View Post
You using 230 grains of powder in your ammo?
What, .50 BMG or 20mm?

A .45 ACP with 230 gr BULLET is loaded with maybe 5 grains of POWDER.
So if you cast your own bullets, yes, you get 30 out of a pound of LEAD.
oh damn haha i was seriously mistaken then haha. so how much grain is in a 230 gr .45 acp bullet? sorry guys im new to all this.
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  #10  
Old 11-21-2011, 07:18 PM
Wrightturn Wrightturn is offline
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shots per pound

If you are talking powder and using say Bullseye a standard load would would be 5.0gr or 1,400 per pound. If you go with slower powder and heavy charges you get fewer shots.

230gr = bullet weight.
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  #11  
Old 11-21-2011, 07:21 PM
cory cory is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by unclebsd View Post
so with 230 gr. that'd be 7000 / 230 = 30.43

that means it will only make 30 rounds?
If you don't have at least 1 good reloading manual, please buy one. If you have one, please read it. This can be a very dangerous practice if you go into it without knowing what you are doing. We just want you to stay safe, and an internet forum will have many answers-unfortunately, some of those answers may be wrong enough to cause you major problems.
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  #12  
Old 11-21-2011, 07:22 PM
Jim Watson Jim Watson is offline
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Quote:
how much grain is in a 230 gr .45 acp bullet?
There is no grain, either wheat or oats in a bullet.

Seriously, "gr" is the abbreviation for "grain" weight.
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  #13  
Old 11-21-2011, 07:24 PM
BlueOvalBandit BlueOvalBandit is online now
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I suggest getting some loading books, ABCs of reloading, Hornady's 8th edition, etc and researching particular loads and practices. You can never have to many references because every gun/test barrel yields different results. That said I load 4.7grn of 700x under a 230grn LEAD ROUND NOSE. Be aware lead and jacketed have DIFFERENT maximums. I load 12 gauge with clays or 700x so I generally have it on hand.
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  #14  
Old 11-21-2011, 07:27 PM
dickttx dickttx is online now
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If you find a powder you like, like maybe HP-38, and load 5.0gn in a .45 ACP case you will get 11,200 loads out of an 8# jug from Powder Valley. At $110.50 + $25.00 Hazmat Fee, + $10.00 shipping, it makes your powder cost 1.3 per round.
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  #15  
Old 11-21-2011, 07:42 PM
Griz44 Griz44 is online now
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Quote:
so how much grain is in a 230 gr .45 acp bullet?
That's a really tough one, How much does a 230 grain bullet weigh? Uh..... let me think for a minute --- AHHHHH I GOT IT - it weighs 230 grains!
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  #16  
Old 11-21-2011, 07:55 PM
JH1911 JH1911 is offline
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Originally Posted by griz44 View Post
that's a really tough one, how much does a 230 grain bullet weigh? Uh..... Let me think for a minute --- ahhhhh i got it - it weighs 230 grains!
lol!
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  #17  
Old 11-21-2011, 07:55 PM
zaxx zaxx is offline
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STOP!! Do not continue until you have researched and understand the basics and math of reloading. Team up with someone experienced in hand loading and willing to coach you through the process. It is imperative that you have a manual ( preferably a number of them) to be able to understand the differences in powders, burn rates and pressure curves and how they relate to bullet weights and specific cartridge loads. Get educated in hand loading and minimize the chances of hurting yourself or someone else.
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  #18  
Old 11-21-2011, 07:59 PM
JH1911 JH1911 is offline
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Sorry, now that I got the tears out of my eyes, it will very depending on your powder charge, powder type, and like has been stated, if you know your charge you can get a rough estimate of rounds per powder.
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  #19  
Old 11-21-2011, 08:00 PM
JH1911 JH1911 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zaxx View Post
STOP!! Do not continue until you have researched and understand the basics and math of reloading. Team up with someone experienced in hand loading and willing to coach you through the process. It is imperative that you have a manual ( preferably a number of them) to be able to understand the differences in powders, burn rates and pressure curves and how they relate to bullet weights and specific cartridge loads. Get educated in hand loading and minimize the chances of hurting yourself or someone else.
What he said!!
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  #20  
Old 11-21-2011, 08:01 PM
tlen tlen is offline
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Sadly, this post tells me that some people just shouldn't consider reloading.
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  #21  
Old 11-21-2011, 08:20 PM
medalguy medalguy is offline
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Go easy, he's new. Remember, we were all new at some point in time. However, for some of us, that was during Hoover's administration but that's another story......

Seriously, unclebsd, you absolutely ARE taking your life and safety into dangerous territory if you do not know fully what you are doing. Nothing wrong with being new, and asking questions, but a very important point has been made, that being you must get some basic knowledge under your belt before attempting to load anything.

I'd recommend The ABC's of Reloading as a starting point. That is an excellent book and will explain the basics of reloading, powder charges, bullet weights, OAL, and the relationship between these. After reading that book, read it all again. Seriously. Then buy yourself AT LEAST TWO reloading manuals from the bullet makers you think you will be using. Different books will usually have slightly different information, and you will be able to make an informed decision about what powder to select, what charge to use, what bullet to use, and what depth to seat it. All of these are important.

Please, please, go buy a few books and educate yourself. If you then still have questions, come back here and ask away.
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  #22  
Old 11-21-2011, 08:28 PM
DirtyRod DirtyRod is offline
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Originally Posted by medalguy View Post
Go easy, he's new. Remember, we were all new at some point in time.
Absolutely! Now, can someone help me find brass for my 175gr .308 loads?!?!
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  #23  
Old 11-21-2011, 08:29 PM
novalty novalty is offline
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We all had to start somewhere. As other mentioned a good reloading manual or 2 or 3 is a must, plus finding someone in your community that reloads already and getting a chance to watch and be a part of it is a big help too. I think you would have recognized the error of 230 gr of powder when you tried to load your first case.
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  #24  
Old 11-21-2011, 08:44 PM
Old Grumpy Old Grumpy is offline
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You need to have an understanding of the basics of reloading before you start. One of the basic standards to reloading is knowing what measurements bullets and powder are described in. 7,000 grains equals one pound.

While bullets (lead) are heavy powder is not. Some "standard" bullet weights for the .45 acp are 185g (g=grains), 200g, 225g, and 230g. powder charges are much lighter (3.5g to 6g or 7g) depending on what powder is being used.

Any of the major reloading guides will lay out the basics for you and put you on the right track.

I load 200g Lead Semi Wad Cutters (LSWC) that weigh 200g each. There are about 35 bullets per pound of lead. I use Winchester 231 powder at 5.1g per round or about 1,372.549 rounds per pound of powder. I pay $21.00 per pound of powder and about $2.45 per pound for bullets.

What ever you do do not get your bullet weight and powder charge reversed.
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  #25  
Old 11-21-2011, 08:45 PM
Dbltapster Dbltapster is offline
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Based on what I have been reading, it would be best if you read about the basics of reloading and/or speak with someone you know who is an experienced reloader. -- making mistakes with this hobby can be dangerous!

As for bullets and powder, their weights are measured in "grains". It is a unit of measure for items weighing less than an ounce. Since bullets and powder are fairly light objects, they are both measured in grains. In terms of weight alone, there is no relationship between bullets and powder.

There are so many variables involved when reloading, it is impossible to ask "how many rounds of ammunition can be produced with one pound of powder?" Things like cailber, case capacity, bullet weight and configuration, powder type, powder volume, burn rate and cartridge application all play a part in determining the grain weight of the powder charge. All responsible reloaders, regardless of experience, rely to one degree or another on reloading data. Bullet and powder manufacturers go to great lengths under tightly controlled conditions to produce dependable and safe reloading data for the consumer. This load data should always be followed closely.
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