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  #1  
Old 11-21-2002, 05:47 PM
cheekser cheekser is offline
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liberator




i was just wondering if anyone has one of these cool little numbers:
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liberator.jpg  
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  #2  
Old 11-21-2002, 06:28 PM
Jim V Jim V is offline
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I have one, complete with the floor plate, the second most commonly lost part, the first being the little ejector stick. Is the one in the photo yours?
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TFL #296 -- MOLON LABE Leonidas c 480 BC -- FFF
If it ain't metal, single stack, and single action, it ain't a 1911 no matter what it looks like!!
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  #3  
Old 11-21-2002, 07:05 PM
Gary W Trott Gary W Trott is offline
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That's neat Jim! Have you ever fired it?
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  #4  
Old 11-21-2002, 07:08 PM
BrianMajors BrianMajors is offline
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Saw an article on one once. It read that it was a BITCH to shoot! Have you ever fired it?
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  #5  
Old 11-21-2002, 07:11 PM
cheekser cheekser is offline
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not mine, i was just wondering how prolific these little gems are.

what are they worth these days?
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  #6  
Old 11-21-2002, 07:40 PM
Boats Boats is offline
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How much cash does one have to spend to get an example?
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  #7  
Old 11-21-2002, 09:00 PM
sam1963 sam1963 is offline
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Does anybody have any history info on the gun?
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  #8  
Old 11-21-2002, 09:08 PM
cheekser cheekser is offline
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all i know is that a division of GM made these in WWII (probably before we got involved officially????) we air-dropped, and distributed them to our allies in underground resistance groups. cool little gun, kinda want one, or at least launch a 230gr slug from that tiny thing.
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  #9  
Old 11-21-2002, 09:26 PM
Jim V Jim V is offline
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They were made by Inland Guide Lamp Division of GM in 1942, they produced something like 2,000,000 of them in a very short period of time. The project called them Flare Projectors to confuse any enemy spies. They were packaged in a cardboard/pasteboard box with a "cartoon" instruction sheet, a supply of ammo and a wooden rod to eject the empties. The cost was around $2.50/unit - delivered. The pistols were to be dropped behind enemy lines to allow those fighting the Gremans or Japanese to have a pistol with which to kill the enemy and take their firearm(s). In Europe, there were not many used because of the STEn guns being dropped for their use. (What would you rather have, a single shot pistol that was slow to load and fire or a subgun that took 32 round magazines?) Most of the pistols were air dropped -- over the North Sea.

There were several variations of the pistol, the first lacked the steel guide rod on the top of the striker. A double barrel model was on the drawing board. The zinc striker block had a couple of different shapes.

To fire the pistol, the striker was pulled to the rear and turned to the side, the breech plate was pulled upward and a cartridge chambered, the breech was closed and the striker was returned to the upright position. The guide pin on the striker block was to assure that the firing pin on the striker remained in line with the firing pin hole in the breech plate. A long "double action" trigger pull caused the striker to move backwards until the sear released. Since the bore was smooth and a bit over sized for the bullet, the pressure levels remained fairly low. Bullets tumbled badly and accuracy was not the strong point of the pistol.

The trigger pull was/is heavy and long. Recoil is not really that bad because of the low pressure curve. I have owned the pistol for 25 years or so and since I got it, there have been perhaps 10 - 15 rounds fired through it.

The striker block was cast zinc and the rest was mild steel, welded together. The barrel was seamless tubing that was roughly chambered on a screw machine. The frame was a steel stamping.


My pistol is among the photos HERE

(If you take a look sign the guest book)

edited to correct typos _ I hope I got 'em all.
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TFL #296 -- MOLON LABE Leonidas c 480 BC -- FFF
If it ain't metal, single stack, and single action, it ain't a 1911 no matter what it looks like!!
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Harold V. B: 03/28/11 D: 11/23/07 Dad, I'll miss you.

Last edited by Jim V; 11-21-2002 at 10:05 PM.
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  #10  
Old 11-21-2002, 09:40 PM
sam1963 sam1963 is offline
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Thank You.
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  #11  
Old 11-21-2002, 10:16 PM
GrantR,Canada GrantR,Canada is offline
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JimV wrote:
"(What would you rather have, a single shot pistol that was slow to load and fire or a subgun that took 32 round magazines?)"

Another relevant point is that the Liberator used .45ACP ammo, while the STEN used 9mm Parabellum - so supplies of ammo could be captured from the Germans. The British Special Operations Executive (SOE) was the entity responsible for covert operations in occupied Europe, including the arming and supply of Resistance forces. Their preference was for weapons chambered for 9mm Parabellum - it is of interest that when the SOE learned that the High Power was to be produced in Canada by Inglis, they put in a request for 50,000 of the pistols. (Clive M. Law, "Inglis Diamond, the Canadian High Power Pistol", p.44)
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  #12  
Old 11-21-2002, 10:41 PM
Gary W Trott Gary W Trott is offline
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Wasn't the idea for using the Liberator to shoot the enemy in the back of his head and then take his weapon?
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  #13  
Old 11-22-2002, 12:32 AM
mpearcex mpearcex is offline
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I would like to have one of those but are their any out there for sale and how much. It was made to shoot the enemy and take their weapon. The barrel on this thing is smooth it doesn't have any rifling
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  #14  
Old 11-22-2002, 12:56 AM
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There are some good images of a Liberator on Ty Moore's website, www.coolgunsite.com. Just go to the images gallery section. Of note is this little tidbit, quoted from the text:

Quote:
Some three million Liberators were made at a rate of 1 every 5 seconds, making it the only gun in history that could be made faster than it could be loaded.
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  #15  
Old 11-22-2002, 10:53 PM
BADSBSNF81 BADSBSNF81 is offline
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It was revived in the 60's for the CIA and made in 9mm. Was called the Deer Gun.
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  #16  
Old 11-22-2002, 11:10 PM
jpwright jpwright is offline
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I hope it was useful to the resistance.

The production rate is phenomenal.

But my GOD, that's an ugly pistol!
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  #17  
Old 11-23-2002, 12:07 AM
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AFAIK they were never used for their intended purpose. They were all made in the space of a month or two, then crated, warehoused, and later on mostly all unceremoniously destroyed.
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Try not to fall into the common trap of wanting to replace everything on your new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out, and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot it for at least 500 rounds, then decide what you don't like and want improved. Vintage 1911's should NEVER be refinished or modified because it ruins any value they had as a collectible firearm.
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  #18  
Old 11-23-2002, 02:05 AM
sr1911a1 sr1911a1 is offline
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Liberator

I have owned one for about 5 years. I got it at a estate sale.
It seems to be complete and funtional. I have neaver fired it and don't plan to. It's allways popular with my friends to look and talk about. I have no ideal what the value is on them. I have heard prices range from $350.00 to $700.00. Guess it depends on the collector. Mine does not have the comic strip that showed how to load it. I have a few pictures I could scan to someone if they would like to see it. I belive there is or use to be a web site on the liberator
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  #19  
Old 11-23-2002, 02:07 AM
PGW PGW is offline
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I've handled one of these little darlings, but never fired one. I asked the guy if it was for sale and for how much. He told me that if I had to ask, I probably couldn't afford it. It sounds a bit cliche, but he was probably right about my financial situation at that time.
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  #20  
Old 11-23-2002, 07:01 AM
Jim V Jim V is offline
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They were packed in the cardbpard boxes, the box was wrapped with oiled paper and sealed.
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TFL #296 -- MOLON LABE Leonidas c 480 BC -- FFF
If it ain't metal, single stack, and single action, it ain't a 1911 no matter what it looks like!!
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Harold V. B: 03/28/11 D: 11/23/07 Dad, I'll miss you.
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  #21  
Old 11-23-2002, 07:57 AM
Iggy Iggy is offline
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Expensive

I saw a discussion about these on another forum not to long ago and there was mention of seeing one for sale at a gun show for $1000.00
Of course askin' it and gettin' it is two different things..
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  #22  
Old 11-24-2002, 08:10 PM
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Actually fired one today.....

At a USGI Show n' Shoot event today I was shown an example owned by a fellow local collector. Even more amazing was the fact that he took it into the indoor range where we were performing a shoot-off competition, and actually fired it a few times. He then let the rest of us fire it as well. I fired maybe a half-dozen rounds total through it. The trigger pull is extremely spongy, with a hard snap as the striker block jumps forward. Recoil is indeed very sharp, as the gun weighs next to nothing. The smooth bore barrel and sloppy chamber combined for abysmal accuracy, with the bullets tumbling mere feet from the muzzle. After the first couple of shots barely hit the paper at 7 yards we moved the target in to about ten feet. Even then the rounds were keyholeing half of the time. The gun also bites you, as when the round is discharged the striker block gets blown back by the expanding gasses, thus trapping the web of your hand as it springs back. After drawing blood with the first shot I moved my hand down on the grip. I also noticed the cases bulged badly, so to say the least I wouldn't recommend anybody shoot one of these things more than a dozen times or so.

BTW I do plan to add a section on my website, with pictures of the Liberator I fired today as well as some general info.
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Try not to fall into the common trap of wanting to replace everything on your new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out, and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot it for at least 500 rounds, then decide what you don't like and want improved. Vintage 1911's should NEVER be refinished or modified because it ruins any value they had as a collectible firearm.
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  #23  
Old 11-24-2002, 11:05 PM
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Saw223 Saw223 is offline
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My dad's father in law owns one, with the box, oiled paper, and the instructions. It's a cool little piece of history.
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  #24  
Old 11-24-2002, 11:32 PM
Greg1911 Greg1911 is offline
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kinda proof that guerrilla warfare can work, even with the most simple weapons.
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  #25  
Old 11-25-2002, 02:36 PM
Jim V Jim V is offline
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The FP-45 (official name) is also proof that it would be a tad difficult to disarm the population.

From concept to final delivery it took six months with 11 weeks of that time spent in producing 1,000,000 pistols at a rate of one every 6.6 seconds. The cost was $2.10/unit.
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TFL #296 -- MOLON LABE Leonidas c 480 BC -- FFF
If it ain't metal, single stack, and single action, it ain't a 1911 no matter what it looks like!!
Do Not Irk The Forum Curmudgeon
Harold V. B: 03/28/11 D: 11/23/07 Dad, I'll miss you.
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