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  #1  
Old 04-20-2011, 12:36 AM
johnsmith1521 johnsmith1521 is offline
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Range Officer recoil spring




I was looking on a couple websites and I saw a recoil spring from Wilson combat that was 18.5 pounds. Is that a good spring to put into my R.O.? I think that my 1911 has a 16 pound spring. does it really make a difference? Thanks for the input...
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  #2  
Old 04-20-2011, 12:44 AM
betterlate111 betterlate111 is offline
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16 lbs is a great spring rate.
Change it when it wears out.
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  #3  
Old 04-20-2011, 02:02 AM
Kodadek Kodadek is offline
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When I replace springs I throw in Wolff 18.5 ILB springs on 1911 but only AFTER I wear out the original springs same as what John Smith said. The one exception was the first 1911 I bought an RIA GI that had a really weak spring.
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  #4  
Old 04-20-2011, 03:26 AM
JBnTX JBnTX is offline
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The first thing I do with a new 1911 pistol (any brand) is replace all the
springs with Wolff springs.

I've never been impressed with the factory recoil spring of any brand of 1911
pistol.

Compare a factory recoil spring to a new Wolff or Wilson recoil spring and the difference in quality is clearly obvious.

I always stay with the orginal design weight of 16 pounds in recoil springs.
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  #5  
Old 04-20-2011, 03:19 PM
Jason D Jason D is online now
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I had a 1911 built for me last year that came with a super powered recoil spring.
There is really no telling just what the weight was, but it caused nothing but malfunctions with standard target ammo.

Changing to a Wolff variable power 16 pound spring solved problems a heavy spring caused.
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  #6  
Old 04-22-2011, 12:16 AM
sud123 sud123 is offline
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I replaced my TrP recoil spring with a wolf 16pd. No issues.
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  #7  
Old 04-22-2011, 12:52 PM
Jolly Rogers Jolly Rogers is offline
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I cannot see why one would replace the suggested spring with one 2.5 lbs heavier in rating. I don't really care where the brass goes. If I find it fine, if not, oh well. The stronger recoil spring induces more muzzle dip when the round chambers and adds additional stress to the slide stop pin and the lower lugs on the barrel.
JMB blueprinted the recoil spring at a little over 14 lbs. so the factory spring is actually over powered already.
Why do something to your gun that has the potential to damage it over time?
Joe
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  #8  
Old 04-22-2011, 07:42 PM
TxGlock9 TxGlock9 is offline
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what is the stock spring weight for the RO??
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Old 04-23-2011, 03:18 PM
Jason D Jason D is online now
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16 pounds is factory standard for all full sized models.
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Old 04-23-2011, 07:39 PM
TxGlock9 TxGlock9 is offline
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thank you.
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  #11  
Old 04-23-2011, 07:52 PM
orrwdd orrwdd is offline
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On a full size SA 45 ACP recoil springs greater than 16# should only be needed if the gun will have a regular diet of HEAVY loads, like +P defense loads. Otherwise you will just me battering your frame and may not reliably feed light loads.

Bill
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  #12  
Old 04-23-2011, 10:15 PM
NORD NORD is offline
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Would using an 18.5 lb spring in combination with a shock buffer work if you occasionally shoot +P defense ammo?
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Old 04-23-2011, 10:45 PM
orrwdd orrwdd is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NORD View Post
Would using an 18.5 lb spring in combination with a shock buffer work if you occasionally shoot +P defense ammo?
In my opinion it would not be necessary. Just don't let your recoil spring get old, replace every 2000 rounds or so.

Bill
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  #14  
Old 04-23-2011, 11:16 PM
saread saread is offline
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How about if you bolt a Weaver rail to the slide and attach an Ultradot?
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  #15  
Old 04-25-2011, 07:51 AM
Jolly Rogers Jolly Rogers is offline
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The slide weight factors into the requirements for recoil springs. Lighter slides (on compact 1911s) use a heavier recoil spring. Adding weight to a 5" 1900 would reduce the spring weight required to cycle properly. All within tuning limits.
I have found that over 16# recoil springs are installed to "promote reliability" and are a bandaid to cover up feeding problems on full size 1911s. There are major gun manufacturers that do this.
There are magazine manufacturers that follow this engineering plan and give up controlled feed to chuck the round up near the barrel throat to cover up mechanical feed problems with a guns state of tune.

Both reduce customer dis- satisfaction and return issues.
Joe
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  #16  
Old 04-25-2011, 03:46 PM
saread saread is offline
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Thanks. This is something I've got to figure out on my RO. I'm guessing in the 13 lb. range with the added weight and target loads. I'm considering a variable rate spring, this seems like the perfect application for it. A little lesser spring rate to get the slide moving back and to help ejection; then a little more spring rate on the back end to get the slide moving to get back into battery. We'll see, should be fun to figure out.
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