1911Forum
Forum   Reviews   Rules   Legal   Site Supporters & Donations   Advertise


Go Back   1911Forum > General > General Gun Discussion


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 01-03-2011, 09:40 AM
cobra83 cobra83 is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 2
Steel vs Stainless Steel




Hey guys, new to the 1911 forum. I've shot a few different brands. Will be buying my first one here pretty soon. I like the Kimber and Colt makes.

I just wanted to know if there was a differece in recoil or shooting etc., between a matte black 1911 and a Stainless Steel 1911?

your thoughts?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 01-03-2011, 09:42 AM
mikeg1005 mikeg1005 is offline
Banned
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Illinois
Posts: 6,478
It is all aesthetics.


MIke.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 01-03-2011, 09:44 AM
BigRam BigRam is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: NW Ohio (Perrysburg)
Posts: 90
recoil is all perspective, usually if the gun weights more there is less recoil. Being both are made of steel they should have the same felt recoil.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 01-03-2011, 09:50 AM
orrwdd orrwdd is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Rigby, Idaho
Age: 65
Posts: 2,273
Quote:
Originally Posted by cobra83 View Post
I just wanted to know if there was a differece in recoil or shooting etc., between a matte black 1911 and a Stainless Steel 1911?

your thoughts?
In most brands the Carbon Steel frames and slides will remain tight longer than the SS ones. You would have to shoot a lot to see the difference though.

Bill
__________________
SMSgt, USAF (ret)
NRA Life Member
IDPA Member, Shooter, Safety Officer
Utah & Enhanced Idaho CWP holder
COTEP# CBOB0476
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 01-03-2011, 09:59 AM
wolf_man wolf_man is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Indianapolis IN
Posts: 56
Carbon steel will need just a little more care than stainless to prevent rust, but that is about the only difference that most would notice. If you carry IWB every day, in an enviornment that would cause the gun and holster to be damp for long periods of time, I would recomend stainless, otherwise, pick whichever you like the looks of better.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 01-03-2011, 11:00 AM
Vern Humphrey Vern Humphrey is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Arkansas, deep in the Ozarks
Posts: 2,436
Quote:
Originally Posted by wolf_man View Post
Carbon steel will need just a little more care than stainless to prevent rust, but that is about the only difference that most would notice. If you carry IWB every day, in an enviornment that would cause the gun and holster to be damp for long periods of time, I would recomend stainless, otherwise, pick whichever you like the looks of better.
Stainless steel can give you a false feeling of security -- if the gun is damp from sweat, be sure there is condensation inside the gun. And the springs and some other parts are made from carbon steel. A gun that looks good on the outside may be rusty on the inside.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 01-03-2011, 11:02 AM
Bullseye1911 Bullseye1911 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Out in the sticks, away from Liberal Leeches
Age: 49
Posts: 6,991
Whichever you like the looks of the best buy it

Others have stated the difference in the care for them
__________________
3.Dont argue with someone stupid, they win by bringing you down to their level and then they beat you with experience.
Libtards will soon start labeling the Bible hate speech. Wait for it
The right of the people to keep and bear arms SHALL NOT BE INFRINGED, Be safe
NRA Life Member and NO I dont do Facebook
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 01-03-2011, 11:04 AM
brickeyee brickeyee is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 1,943
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vern Humphrey View Post
Stainless steel can give you a false feeling of security -- if the gun is damp from sweat, be sure there is condensation inside the gun. And the springs and some other parts are made from carbon steel. A gun that looks good on the outside may be rusty on the inside.
Sweat has salt in it.

Sodium Chloride.

The chloride ion is one of the few things that can attack many grades of stainless steel, including the ones used in many guns.

It causes pitting of the surface, but NOT red iron oxide rust.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 01-03-2011, 12:09 PM
Hardbawl Hardbawl is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Trout Run, PA
Posts: 548
Cobra88:

It depends on your environment. Orrwdd lives in Utah. It only rains there every third year. For him rust is a minor issue, second to surface wear from heavy use. His answer is corect if you live in Utah.

I live in north central Pennsylvania. It rains here several times a week. The very SOUND of my .45 rusting has been known to keep me awake at night. Here in PA, stainless steel is a precious metal.

Until the invention of the Glock, I thought you had to be nuts to select a carbon steel gun if stainless was avaliable. However, Glocks don't rust. After a while manufactures found out that there were coatings that when applied would prevent rust.

When I was contemplating ordering my last 1911 [a Wilson Combat CQB Compact Elite] I asked the guys on the Wilson page of this forum about finishes and rust resistance. One guy Blr, I think, kindly responded that Wilson parkerizes their carbon steel pistols and then sprays them with an epoxy finish. This finish will not rust, he says. He wrote some real in depth articles about gun finishes for this forum that you should read before buying a pistol. [PM me if you have trouble finding it]

For me, in PA, a pistol in stainless steel or Wilson's Armour tuff finish will stand up to daily carry duty. A blued finish or black oxide will rust. Period.

So, it depends on the emvironment and the use that you plan for your handgun.

You pays your money and you makes your choice.
__________________
Load 'em Hot! Hardbawl
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 01-03-2011, 01:43 PM
orutra orutra is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: denver, colorado
Posts: 685
If you buy a stainless it will look almost the same after several years of hard use as when it was new.
Every blued "carry" 1911 I have seen begins to show wear on day 1.
If it's a range gun that can be cleaned up after every session and won't be in and out of holsters, etc. then nothing is prettier than a well blued pistol. If you're gonna run it hard SS is probably the way to go
__________________
Two bad knees, can't fight or run
That's why I'm prepared and carry a gun
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 01-03-2011, 03:31 PM
CZJedi CZJedi is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 546
Actually read something interesting in stainless vs. blued steel over at the Clark Custom web page. I was looking into the 460 Rowland conversion they have, and noticed that they recommend blued steel over stainless. In the FAQ section, they give this for a reason: "MOST Stainless steel creates a great deal more friction than traditional blue steel."
__________________
-May the forCZe be with you!
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 01-03-2011, 04:12 PM
Ivymike Ivymike is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: the drier part of WA
Posts: 397
Quote:
Originally Posted by brickeyee View Post
Sweat has salt in it.

Sodium Chloride.

The chloride ion is one of the few things that can attack many grades of stainless steel, including the ones used in many guns.

It causes pitting of the surface, but NOT red iron oxide rust.
Thats what everyone forgets. Stainless and aluminum don't rust, but they do corrode.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 01-03-2011, 06:56 PM
dahermit dahermit is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Souther Michigan
Posts: 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeg1005 View Post
It is all aesthetics.
I knew it! I knew it! Stainless aesthetics steel kicks more!
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 01-03-2011, 07:14 PM
grendelbane grendelbane is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 746
I bought my New Agent last February. It has been carried a lot, and shot some too. First thing I did was wax the thing. Wax may not do much for the aluminum frame, but it really helps to protect the slide. It is a regular process, I have waxed it about 3 times now. It looks about like it did when it was new. We have humid Summers here in Kentucky.

Eventually, I might spring for a melonite type finish for the slide, still undecided on the aluminum frame.

My other 1911s usually get painted. I much prefer carbon steel with a good protective finish to stainless steel.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 01-03-2011, 07:15 PM
custom2's Avatar
custom2 custom2 is online now
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 7,534
Did you just ask if black guns shoot better than silver guns?
__________________
GOOGLE IS YOUR FRIEND
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 01-03-2011, 07:22 PM
grendelbane grendelbane is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 746
Quote:
Originally Posted by custom2 View Post
Did you just ask if black guns shoot better than silver guns?
My 2-tone guns shoot just as well as any body's shiney or black ones.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 01-03-2011, 07:46 PM
mnyshrpknvs mnyshrpknvs is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Iowa
Posts: 407
Personally, I like Carbon Steel best. Stronger but more easily effected by corrosive materials. This has been my experience with collecting knives and using them hard over the years. Also, there is no pistol more sexy than a 1911 with a top shelf Bluing Job.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 01-04-2011, 12:25 AM
eagle0711 eagle0711 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: southern Oregun
Posts: 1,194
Heads- High Carbon Tails- Stainless

Not much difference between new guns. If you were to buy an old model when stainless was first introduced the parts, namely slide and frame would gall.

Less up keep on stainless. Some believe that a stainless barrel will last longer, at least on a rifle. High carbon [ non-stainless ] is considered a little smoother.

Really not a nickels worth of difference when you reach the bottom line.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 01-04-2011, 12:58 AM
CWarner CWarner is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: New Mexico
Posts: 2,347
.....Shiny ones shoot better in the city.





CW
__________________
http://www.EliteWarriorArmament.com/
http://www.1911Pro.com
Rio Rancho, New Mexico
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 01-04-2011, 02:28 PM
cobra83 cobra83 is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 2
Thanks guys. that will be a big factor. I live in Michigan. you guys have been cool with me being a noob.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Hardbawl View Post
Cobra88:It depends on your environment. Orrwdd lives in Utah. It only rains there every third year. For him rust is a minor issue, second to surface wear from heavy use. His answer is corect if you live in Utah.

I live in north central Pennsylvania. It rains here several times a week. The very SOUND of my .45 rusting has been known to keep me awake at night. Here in PA, stainless steel is a precious metal.

Until the invention of the Glock, I thought you had to be nuts to select a carbon steel gun if stainless was avaliable. However, Glocks don't rust. After a while manufactures found out that there were coatings that when applied would prevent rust.

When I was contemplating ordering my last 1911 [a Wilson Combat CQB Compact Elite] I asked the guys on the Wilson page of this forum about finishes and rust resistance. One guy Blr, I think, kindly responded that Wilson parkerizes their carbon steel pistols and then sprays them with an epoxy finish. This finish will not rust, he says. He wrote some real in depth articles about gun finishes for this forum that you should read before buying a pistol. [PM me if you have trouble finding it]

For me, in PA, a pistol in stainless steel or Wilson's Armour tuff finish will stand up to daily carry duty. A blued finish or black oxide will rust. Period.

So, it depends on the emvironment and the use that you plan for your handgun.

You pays your money and you makes your choice.
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 01-04-2011, 03:49 PM
orfeo orfeo is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Age: 54
Posts: 444
There is another huge aesthetic benefit to stainless not mentioned so far:

You can easily rub out scratches on the brushed-flats with a piece of Scotchbrite, keeping it looking REALLY fresh for a LONG time (maybe indefinitely).

Coated/applied finishes are not as forgiving, and must be completely re-done to remove minor scratches and wear.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 01-04-2011, 10:46 PM
WESHOOT2 WESHOOT2 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Vermont (Caspian country)
Age: 60
Posts: 15,315
where's my magnet

I now insist on carbon-based units. It allows for the finest pistolsmithing, and then finishing with either electroless nickel or (my preferred) NP3 alleviates any rust/corrosion/wear concerns.

I don't care about 'looks'.
__________________
'
"all my ammo is mostly-retired factory ammo"
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:54 PM.


NOTICE TO USERS OF THIS SITE: By continuing to use this site, you certify that you have read and agree to abide by the Legal Terms of Use. All information, data, text or other materials ("Content") posted to this site by any users are the sole responsibility of those users. 1911Forum does not guarantee the accuracy, integrity, or quality of such Content.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 2011 1911Forum.com, LLC. All Rights Reserved