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  #1  
Old 12-31-2010, 12:04 PM
MonroeAG MonroeAG is offline
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WWII .45 Ammo




I just found a few boxes of this stuff buried away in my brothers ammo stash. It is marked:
Head stamp.

E C 43

Boxes.

Pistol Ball
Caliber .45 M1911
Ammunition lot E.C. -24824XC
Repacked E.C. 7-44

How much do people pay for this stuff?
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  #2  
Old 12-31-2010, 02:25 PM
Retarmyaviator Retarmyaviator is offline
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Is it brass or steel case?
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  #3  
Old 12-31-2010, 08:52 PM
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Rifter Rifter is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MonroeAG View Post
I just found a few boxes of this stuff buried away in my brothers ammo stash. It is marked:
Head stamp.

E C 43

Boxes.

Pistol Ball
Caliber .45 M1911
Ammunition lot E.C. -24824XC
Repacked E.C. 7-44

How much do people pay for this stuff?
There's a lot of such stuff floating around. I've got a bunch of it from 1942 myself. They are worth the most if they are unopened and the tissue paper wrapper around the box is intact (if it has one, not all of them did). If you open one or they're broken open they're not worth much. Check Gunbroker and other collector sites for pricing.
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  #4  
Old 01-01-2011, 07:55 PM
MonroeAG MonroeAG is offline
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They are steel case, and from what I have read are corrosive as all get out, meaning solvent and a hot bath in Dawn dish soap. After reading this I think I will forget the idea of putting them down range. Too much clean up involved in that not to mention missing a part on a $1000.00 handgun might be irritating to find "missing" or frozen because I missed a spot.

Matter of fact of all the boxes that I have only one was opened. All are in excellent condition for being that old.

As far as I can tell at this time i'm sure they're just going to live a quiet life in the gun closet as a conversation piece for people to talk over.

I guess I was just trying to find out if I had stumbled across a few small bricks of gold.

But on the subject of "corrosive" ammo. Since I have never really knowingly used it. Am fortunate enough to be born in a newer age not having to deal with that stuff... (ok, prob a bad joke...) But how damaging to firearms is it? will it make parts disappear or just foul up like corrosion on a penny? Are the effects reversible?

I can't imagine that every Thompson, M1, M2, and 1911, were cleaned after every use, and some of them Uncle Sam still uses today.

Thanks for the info guys.
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  #5  
Old 01-01-2011, 08:21 PM
Retarmyaviator Retarmyaviator is offline
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I have no problem firing corresive ammunition, the lesson to know is to clean your firearm properly after firing corresive ammunition. If you do that you will not have any problems.

Should you want to sell the ammunition please let me know. I have no intention of firing it as I look at as having more value as a collectable than fired ammunition.
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  #6  
Old 01-07-2011, 08:30 PM
billcope billcope is offline
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just an fyi, in with a bunch of loose ammo, i came across one marked: F A 28

Which i am assuming is Frankford Arsenal 1928, which i understand is where the ammo was first developed.

This one will not get shot.
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  #7  
Old 01-10-2011, 07:24 PM
billyram billyram is offline
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I've shot quite a few tins of that ammo with out any problems. After shooting corrosive ammo just place the barrel in boiling soapy water and run some tight wet patches through it until they come out clean. Then clean again like you would shooting non corrosive ammo.
Billy
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  #8  
Old 01-11-2011, 03:27 PM
1saxman 1saxman is offline
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That's right, water is the solvent for corrosive salts residues. The favorite compound of many is an emulsion of water and Ballistol, about 10:1. You use this to wash/flush the whole gun with particular emphasis on the barrel, bolt, gas system (if any), muzzle devices, receiver, magazine and exterior. This must be done ASAP after the firing session. Use your regular bore cleaner. Follow up with straight Ballistol for your gun oil.
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  #9  
Old 01-12-2011, 11:26 AM
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JimH JimH is offline
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Whatever they pay for it is too much unless you want a few rounds (or unbroken boxes) for a collection.

Steel cased, corrosive - do not shoot it!

If I am not mistaken it was made in Evansville IN.

Jim
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  #10  
Old 01-13-2011, 04:49 PM
Largo Largo is offline
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Several years back, I got 500 rounds of Evansville Chrysler 1943-vintage hardball for a good price and shot it through a Springfield GI. Every last round went bang. I cleaned the gun afterwards with MPro-7, which neutralizes the corrosive salts in the fouling (I think it may actually be the water in the formula that does this). Gun did not rust.
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  #11  
Old 01-14-2011, 06:04 AM
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Rifter Rifter is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Largo View Post
Several years back, I got 500 rounds of Evansville Chrysler 1943-vintage hardball for a good price and shot it through a Springfield GI. Every last round went bang. I cleaned the gun afterwards with MPro-7, which neutralizes the corrosive salts in the fouling (I think it may actually be the water in the formula that does this). Gun did not rust.
If I had a nickel for every round of WWI and WWII .45 ball ammo I've sent downrange, I could retire to Tahiti. Never had a lick of trouble with rust or corrosion of any kind. The horror stories about shooting corrosive ammo are just that, stories.
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  #12  
Old 01-16-2011, 09:13 AM
CactusCapt CactusCapt is offline
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I have been playing with a Yugo Tokarev lately and burning through absurd amounts of 7.62x25--all of it corrosive. My cleanup usually involves a Ballistol/water mix and attention to detail. I've had no pitting, no rust, no fuzz. Nor have I had any over the last 30+ years on any of my Milsurp toys, some of which are now quite expensive. Don't fear corrosive ammo--just clean appropriately and all will be well.
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