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  #1  
Old 12-25-2010, 08:36 PM
nighttime nighttime is offline
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Holding the 1911 trigger down while cycling the slide




Read an article or comment some time back about this how you are supposed to squeeze on the trigger while cycling a 1911 cause it prevents wear on some important part inside. I have forgotten the details, but don't do this when I am chambering a round or emptying the chamber. Any of you remember this article or discussion?
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  #2  
Old 12-25-2010, 09:03 PM
230therapy 230therapy is offline
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Don't be fooling around with all that while chambering or unchambering a cartridge.
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  #3  
Old 12-25-2010, 09:11 PM
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I read somewhere that the world is flat but I don't believe that either.
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  #4  
Old 12-25-2010, 09:15 PM
DR505 DR505 is offline
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I think it is for dry-firing so you can practice trigger reset.
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  #5  
Old 12-25-2010, 09:35 PM
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Don't ever have your trigger finger anywhere near the trigger when loading or unloading a pistol.

During dry fire to practice trigger reset, yes. Doing so doesn't protect anything. It just more realistically simulates actual cycling.
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Last edited by custom2; 12-25-2010 at 09:38 PM.
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  #6  
Old 12-26-2010, 02:09 AM
45Driver 45Driver is offline
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It protects the sear

from being dragged against the hammer hooks.

Supposed to keep a finely tuned trigger stay tuned longer.
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  #7  
Old 12-26-2010, 04:14 AM
Ross Carter Ross Carter is offline
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Years ago it was SOP to hold the trigger back while dropping the slide to load a 1911 that had a trigger job. It duplicates what happens when you actually fire and prevents hammer follow. Many AD's as you can imagine were caused when some would double clutch the trigger. With the improvements in parts and trigger job techniques it is not needed and most competitions have banned the practice.
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  #8  
Old 12-26-2010, 07:01 AM
guysmith guysmith is offline
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It's a very good way to get DQ'd in a match and or asked to leave the range. Finger OFF the trigger until your sights are aligned on the target and you are sure of your backstop. As a Range Safety Officer I give 1 trigger warning then you are asked to leave my stage and to discuss the issue with the Match Director. There are no second chances with gun safety as once the weapon goes bang the bullet goes somewhere hopefully without hurting somebody, but you never know until it happens and it's better for it not to happen.
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  #9  
Old 12-26-2010, 09:04 AM
deldago deldago is offline
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I could see where practicing this could get you in trouble.One day you have a ND in your brain while loading the gun and muscle memory takes over.You can guess the rest.
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  #10  
Old 12-26-2010, 09:50 AM
nighttime nighttime is offline
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Thanks for the replies. This had nothing to do with dry firing or practice, but had to do with protecting some part. I have not subscribbed to it, but tried it a few times and did not think it was safe so gave it up years ago and do not recommend it. the trigger should only be used to dropping the hammer on a round or an empty chamber (that you have visually checked that it is empty and, even then treat as it is loaded).
Thanks again for the replies.
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  #11  
Old 12-26-2010, 03:55 PM
Greyson Greyson is offline
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It was SOP for super-light triggers a while ago. Super-light. Won't be an issue for your 3+ pound triggers.

Teaching a very new user about trigger-rest, or figuring out trigger-reset on a new weapon; while using an loaded weapon, is the only time this is legitimately used anymore.

Now...I am not saying some blue-flamer gunsmith isn't using it to test something, but that is his job. As a user, it's a no-no.

Regards,
Greyson
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  #12  
Old 12-26-2010, 04:07 PM
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Bullseye Match pistols were specially modified with lighter triggers and super-tight accurizing, and thus were somewhat delicate. They had their own manual of arms to prevent ruining an expensive trigger or accurizing job. Those rules didn't apply to stock 1911s which were meant as combat pistols. Unfortunately some of today's expensive customs blur the line between a rugged combat weapon and a delicate target pistol.
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  #13  
Old 12-26-2010, 04:25 PM
timcalhoun timcalhoun is offline
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I don't know what would be saved by pinning the trigger and racking the slide anyway. The disco will get pushed down by the rail which frees the sear and then the sear will still drag on the hammer hooks as the slide goes back. For bullseye shooters it could conceivably give you the same trigger pull for the first round as the rest since that is how the gun functions.

Now if you pin the trigger, cock the hammer to full cock, release the trigger, and then ease the hammer onto the sear, that makes sense as far as saving some wear. I do this all the time.
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  #14  
Old 12-26-2010, 04:45 PM
IronForge IronForge is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by custom2 View Post
Don't ever have your trigger finger anywhere near the trigger when loading or unloading a pistol.

During dry fire to practice trigger reset, yes. Doing so doesn't protect anything. It just more realistically simulates actual cycling.
+1

Finger off the trigger until you are ready to shoot!
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  #15  
Old 12-26-2010, 05:05 PM
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DeltaKilo DeltaKilo is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dsk View Post
Bullseye Match pistols were specially modified with lighter triggers and super-tight accurizing, and thus were somewhat delicate. They had their own manual of arms to prevent ruining an expensive trigger or accurizing job. Those rules didn't apply to stock 1911s which were meant as combat pistols. Unfortunately some of today's expensive customs blur the line between a rugged combat weapon and a delicate target pistol.
And, i think, some people over-baby their 1911s, too...
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  #16  
Old 12-26-2010, 05:05 PM
Greyson Greyson is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dsk View Post
Bullseye Match pistols were specially modified with lighter triggers and super-tight accurizing, and thus were somewhat delicate. They had their own manual of arms to prevent ruining an expensive trigger or accurizing job. Those rules didn't apply to stock 1911s which were meant as combat pistols. Unfortunately some of today's expensive customs blur the line between a rugged combat weapon and a delicate target pistol.
DSK says it better than me. So this...

To the OP, It is good to understand why things are the way they are and how we got there. If you just repeat rules or dogma, when the inevitable conflict happens, you don't have a logical sense of which why to turn.

Regards,
Greyson
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