1911Forum
Forum   Reviews   Rules   Legal   Site Supporters & Donations   Advertise


Go Back   1911Forum > Hardware & Accessories > Reloading Bench


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 04-28-2010, 07:45 PM
iGun iGun is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Pacific NW
Posts: 2,182
Advice about old RCBS Jr press




Folks,

I could use some advice. I need to get back into reloading to feed my new DW Valor that will hopefully arrive soon. I haven't done any reloading for 25 years, but I have a box-o-stuff in the attic. I have an old RCBS Jr press, and a Pacific Powder measure, and some dies for .357 and 10mm/.40.

Eventually, I plan on getting a modern progressive setup--probably a Hornady LNL. But for now, I want to get some dies and make use of the old system while I save some cash for a new system.

So, here's my question: what dies should I get that will work with the RCBS and later for the LNL? It looks like Hornady still makes bushings for my Pacific measure.

Thanks in advance for your input.
__________________
COTEP #0381
"I have one simple request... and that is to have sharks with fricking laser beams attached to their heads!"
--Dr. Evil
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 04-28-2010, 07:56 PM
muzhunter muzhunter is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 13
I have the RCBS JR also. and use it for rifle. Then I started in on the pistol cals. NOT MUCH FUN!

Any way bought the Hornady LNL, and I like the press a lot. I have both RCBS and Hornady dies for pistol. If I was you and you buy the Hornady press get Hornady dies. They have a longer threaded body and will work better with the quick change out bushings that your new press would come with.

I have also gone as far as thinking of sell the RCBS pistol dies and change to all Hornady dies for pistol cals.

Muzhunter
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 04-28-2010, 08:01 PM
iGun iGun is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Pacific NW
Posts: 2,182
Muz,

So the new Hornady dies will fit the old press?

I recall loading 500 10mm rounds at a time on that old press... you are right, not much fun, but better than a stick in the eye or not being able to shoot.
__________________
COTEP #0381
"I have one simple request... and that is to have sharks with fricking laser beams attached to their heads!"
--Dr. Evil
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 04-28-2010, 08:10 PM
GOA Guy GOA Guy is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Ohio
Age: 61
Posts: 788
Quote:
Originally Posted by iGun View Post
Folks,

I could use some advice. I need to get back into reloading to feed my new DW Valor that will hopefully arrive soon. I haven't done any reloading for 25 years, but I have a box-o-stuff in the attic. I have an old RCBS Jr press, and a Pacific Powder measure, and some dies for .357 and 10mm/.40.

Eventually, I plan on getting a modern progressive setup--probably a Hornady LNL. But for now, I want to get some dies and make use of the old system while I save some cash for a new system.

So, here's my question: what dies should I get that will work with the RCBS and later for the LNL? It looks like Hornady still makes bushings for my Pacific measure.

Thanks in advance for your input.
I don't know if RCBS will have any dies in their stock for the Jr. or not. You might find some on E-Bay etc. If you had some custom bushings machined the Jr. dies may work in a 7/8-14 press if they are long enough. The custom bushings would probably cost more than new 7/8-14 dies though. Someone will probably be along shortly with a more definitive answer.

Looks like someone already made it!

Last edited by GOA Guy; 04-28-2010 at 08:13 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 04-28-2010, 08:24 PM
muzhunter muzhunter is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 13
Maybe I'm wrong but I thought all presses and dies have all the same threads? Maybe, my press is called a jr partner?

This I know for sure, the press is not a rock chucker model, it is a RCBS the ram and handel is much smaller than the Rock Chucker. Never had to buy special dies. Both brands work in either press.

Call RCBS 1-800-533-5000

Muzhunter

Last edited by muzhunter; 04-28-2010 at 08:29 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 04-28-2010, 08:27 PM
GOA Guy GOA Guy is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Ohio
Age: 61
Posts: 788
Quote:
Originally Posted by muzhunter View Post
Maybe I'm wrong but I thought all presses and dies have all the same threads? Maybe, my press is called a jr partner?

This I know for sure, the press is not a rock chucker model, it an RCBS the ram and handel is much smaller than the Rock Chucker. Never had to buy special dies. Both brands work in either press

Muzhunter
That would be a Partner.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 04-29-2010, 07:52 AM
akjohnsons akjohnsons is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 14
I have an RCBS Jr press. Works fine with any standard die. I own Lee and RCBS dies. Borrowed Hornady, Redding, etc dies and never had a problem.

Loaded thousands of rounds over the many years I've owned the press. Santa refuses to bring me a better press - he says this one works fine so suck it up and deal with it.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 04-29-2010, 10:20 AM
ClarkEMyers ClarkEMyers is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 2,445
It really doesn't matter much - I'll say Dillon or Redding Pro.

It really doesn't matter much - I'll say Dillon or Redding Pro. -

Most all presses and any likely to be encountered today use 7/8-14 threaded dies. In today's world the Dillon Square Deal B uses dies unique to that setup and in yesterday's world the Lyman Trueline Jr and other Lyman products uses a small thread die setup (can be bushed up to 7/8-14 but don't do it) - some very large cartridges - black powder, British Empire 50 Browning Machine and up - are bigger than 7/8-14 and demand different treatment.

Some dies as noted above are longer and some are shorter so that in the past some dies for very short - pistol - cases - required moving the lock ring below the tool head in the Hornady LNL because the die was screwed far enough down that the threads did not extend far enough up for the lock ring. With accomodation everything still worked.

Either RCBS or Hornady - or Lyman or Forster/Bonanza or Lee or ...... - will almost certainly work just fine in both the RCBS Jr. and in the Hornady.

Just the same I'd consider the Dillon or Redding Pro as being optimized for progressive presses - read the catalogs and sales literature - the Redding micrometer dies are easy to adjust from the top and there are other differences of taste.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 04-29-2010, 10:31 AM
Jim Watson Jim Watson is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Florence, Alabama, USA
Posts: 13,595
Loading dies have followed the 7/8"x14 thread standard estabished by the old Pacific company over 50 years ago. Pacific was also the first to use the T-slot shellholders that everybody takes for granted now.

There are few exceptions in production. The Dillon Square Deal has its own proprietary dies to keep the size and cost down. You can still buy 5/8" dies for Lyman 310 tong tools and some of the old Lyman presses.

There can be some interference. Some old Lee dies have short threaded sections that do not work well in other brands of press. But they changed that about ten years ago.

You can get into interference with large lock rings on progressive loaders. But smaller ones are cheap. Dillon sells a very skinny one, and a wrench to fit.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 04-29-2010, 11:58 AM
iGun iGun is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Pacific NW
Posts: 2,182
Thanks for the advice. This is helpful. It looks like I can get a set of 3 Hornady dies for $40:
CGND Nitride Full-length Sizing Die, CGND Adjustable Case Mouth Expander Die and CGND Seater Die with taper crimp.

And do I also need a separate Hornady Taper Crimp Die ($15)?

By contrast, the Redding Pro set of Sizing, Seating Die and Taper Crimp Dies is $138, plus a $20 expander die. Are these really worth the extra $$$ ?

Lastly, any suggestions on a good reloading guide?
__________________
COTEP #0381
"I have one simple request... and that is to have sharks with fricking laser beams attached to their heads!"
--Dr. Evil
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 04-29-2010, 12:50 PM
ClarkEMyers ClarkEMyers is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 2,445
Quote:
Originally Posted by iGun View Post
And do I also need a separate Hornady Taper Crimp Die ($15)?

By contrast, the Redding Pro set of Sizing, Seating Die and Taper Crimp Dies is $138, plus a $20 expander die. Are these really worth the extra $$$ ?

Lastly, any suggestions on a good reloading guide?
(1) Need? No absolutely not. In the single stage press it is technically possible but tedious to seat without crimping and then to subsequently crimp as a separate operation using the furnished die - adjustment gets tedious. Many people for many years have done just fine with a three die set. I prefer a 4 die set for straight walled pistol cartridges but then again I prefer to have a Lyman Type M expander to go with my dies and so on and so forth.

(2) Must be worth it to some people for some purposes, I suppose I'm often one but it's a hobby to me. Obviously folks load with dies from all the makers and I started out with a nutcracker tool when that was a cheap entry and could still make do with an old one. For most purposes most of the time economy is the way to go but then again for high production the more expensive dies may pay for themselves one way or another.

(3) Folks usually suggest ABC's of Reloading - in its many incarnations. For my money the old ones are worth seeking out for a solid grounding -the books by Phil Sharpe and Earl Naramore in the last as edited and updated editions are - taken together - a solid grounding. Richard Lee's Modern Reloading - as worked over and updated - is a useful modern book that belongs in the same company. Mostly I'd suggest seeing what your library has and can get interlibrary - Nonte and Wooters and others are often found in libraries.

Last edited by ClarkEMyers; 04-29-2010 at 12:52 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 04-29-2010, 01:01 PM
iGun iGun is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Pacific NW
Posts: 2,182
Thanks Clark. This is a big help.
__________________
COTEP #0381
"I have one simple request... and that is to have sharks with fricking laser beams attached to their heads!"
--Dr. Evil
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 03-07-2012, 11:41 PM
pmhayden pmhayden is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: Western USA
Posts: 477
I have an RCBS Jr. I have been reloading for about a year. It gets a little tedious loading .45 and .9mm, but works fine for rifle, which is my main thing. I kind of like loading in single stage for rifle.

My question - I had a heck of a time resizing LC 7.62. My whole press shook, and the plywood table bent. It was hard. I thought something was wrong, but I did some research and decided it had been fired in an M14 or FAL, and it was not unusual. But it got me to thinking about a better press as I will have more LC. I know a lot of people will say to move up to a progressive, but I really don't feel the need. It is not a volume thing.Would it be worth it to upgrade to an RCBS Rockchucker? Or would it have the same problem with LC? Or is there another single stage press out there that is better?
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 03-08-2012, 09:05 AM
Old Grumpy Old Grumpy is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Central Illinois
Posts: 3,211
Quote:
Originally Posted by pmhayden View Post
Would it be worth it to upgrade to an RCBS Rockchucker?
I use my Rock Chucker to load for my .458 Win Mag and it works fine. You will need to make sure your bench (table) is heavy duty, but the press is more than strong enough.
__________________
Molon labe!

"I'd rather be a hammer than a nail, yes I would, if I only could, I surely would."
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 03-08-2012, 09:32 AM
AndyC's Avatar
AndyC AndyC is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Dallas, TX
Age: 49
Posts: 5,096
Quote:
Originally Posted by pmhayden View Post
My question - I had a heck of a time resizing LC 7.62. My whole press shook, and the plywood table bent. It was hard.
More solid bench needed - or put a thin steel plate under the press. You are using case-lube of some kind, right?
__________________
My Iraq Pics

Preferred Travel Agent - 72 Virgins Dating Club
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 03-08-2012, 05:57 PM
BYJO4 BYJO4 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 5,814
Your bench needs to be rock solid with no give or flex when using your press. The Rockchucker press will give you more leverage but still need a good bench.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 03-08-2012, 09:56 PM
pmhayden pmhayden is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: Western USA
Posts: 477
Using Imperial lube, and the bench is made of two 3/4 sheets of plywood glued and screwed together, and nailed to the wall studs in back. (I tend to over-build.)

Well, I guess LC is just tough stuff, then.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 03-10-2012, 03:58 PM
TonyT TonyT is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Michigan
Posts: 580
I have the predecessor of the RCBS Jr the old ca 1968 RCBS A-2 press. Any 7/8"x14 threaded dies set will work on the Hornady LNL or Dillon 550. You will find that the newer carbide sizing dies are much better than the old all steel dies.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:03 AM.


NOTICE TO USERS OF THIS SITE: By continuing to use this site, you certify that you have read and agree to abide by the Legal Terms of Use. All information, data, text or other materials ("Content") posted to this site by any users are the sole responsibility of those users. 1911Forum does not guarantee the accuracy, integrity, or quality of such Content.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 2011 1911Forum.com, LLC. All Rights Reserved