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  #1  
Old 03-09-2009, 11:51 AM
leftnose leftnose is offline
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De-Cocking a Kimber. What's the correct method?




Hi All,

I was reading through the manual for my new Custom Target II and I noticed something interesting. Kimber does not recommend easing the hammer forward to de-cock as it can alter the sear interface. Instead, the recommend dry firing the gun. Of course, dry firing has its own set of issues.

Which do you guys do? Ease the hammer down by hand or dry fire?
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  #2  
Old 03-09-2009, 11:54 AM
69charger 69charger is offline
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#1 on the dry fire.
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  #3  
Old 03-09-2009, 12:04 PM
dougbk dougbk is offline
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I dry fire and if it is someone elses gun or a store gun that they do not want dry fired I will put my finger between the hammer and firing pin and allow the hammer to drop on my finger.
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  #4  
Old 03-09-2009, 12:06 PM
She45 She45 is offline
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Dry fire
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  #5  
Old 03-09-2009, 12:22 PM
detacbob detacbob is offline
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Dry Fire
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  #6  
Old 03-09-2009, 12:23 PM
facilitator facilitator is offline
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+1 on dry fire.
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  #7  
Old 03-09-2009, 12:26 PM
farley45 farley45 is offline
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again dry fire.
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  #8  
Old 03-09-2009, 12:59 PM
eljay45 eljay45 is offline
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Dry firing will not hurt your pistol.
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  #9  
Old 03-09-2009, 01:28 PM
VolGrad VolGrad is offline
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dry fire
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  #10  
Old 03-09-2009, 01:32 PM
SRJim SRJim is offline
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dry fire once again.


See a trend? It's a 1911.
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  #11  
Old 03-09-2009, 01:56 PM
Black Majik Black Majik is offline
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Dryfire.
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  #12  
Old 03-09-2009, 02:31 PM
leftnose leftnose is offline
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I guess the dry fires have it.

Thanks guys!
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  #13  
Old 03-09-2009, 03:12 PM
jdm jdm is offline
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Oooh, oooh, me too!

Dry fire.
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  #14  
Old 03-09-2009, 07:11 PM
CobraFast1 CobraFast1 is offline
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Yep. I dry fire mine. You have to ease the slide back on an empty chamber, don't let it slam without chambering a round.
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  #15  
Old 03-09-2009, 07:51 PM
F16DCC F16DCC is offline
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You can dry fire a 1911 till your thumb bleeds, you get bored, or you die of old age. In the end, it will not hurt the gun.
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  #16  
Old 03-09-2009, 09:01 PM
jdm jdm is offline
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Come on... who's going to be brave and be the first to recommend against dry firing? Anybody, anybody?
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  #17  
Old 03-09-2009, 09:05 PM
69charger 69charger is offline
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OK. Lick your finger before you pull the trigger. Wet firing.
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  #18  
Old 03-09-2009, 09:26 PM
CHILL CHILL is offline
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EASE THE HAMMER FORWARD!

jk...

...Dry Fire
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  #19  
Old 03-09-2009, 09:52 PM
techieguy techieguy is online now
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Well the RO in all the IDPA practices always have you dry fire all firearms... So my 1911 gets dry fired.

slide
hammer
holster...
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  #20  
Old 03-09-2009, 11:15 PM
jumbo72 jumbo72 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CHILL View Post
EASE THE HAMMER FORWARD!

jk...

...Dry Fire
dammit, beat me to it!!

actually, i've been easing the hammer down, i will be dry firing from now on.
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  #21  
Old 03-10-2009, 01:53 PM
RainDodger RainDodger is offline
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Ok. I'll say it. I never dry fire any of my semi-auto pistols.

I'll say this - I've never owned a Kimber, but I'm waiting for the arrival of a newly ordered ProCarry HDII in .38 Super. Perhaps after taking it apart and seeing what makes it tick, I'll change my mind. Up to now though, and for the last 50+ years of gun ownership, I do not dry fire my weapons.

I have only dry fired Smith revolvers, that have a floating firing pin mounted on the hammer.

Nope, I'm not going to be drawn into an argument about it either. There's just (generally) no need to dry fire a weapon. I ease the hammers down.

How's that?
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  #22  
Old 03-10-2009, 01:58 PM
Whiteboy Whiteboy is offline
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I've been easing the hammer down
If I do dryfire it, it's usually with a snap cap. But the I have to get it out by pulling the slide back and cocking it again.
ARGHH! It's a never ending battle!
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  #23  
Old 03-10-2009, 02:00 PM
eljay45 eljay45 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RainDodger View Post

There's just (generally) no need to dry fire a weapon.

Dry firng is a good way to learn trigger control , it is also required in IDPA and USPSA competitions. Dry firng will not hurt a 1911.
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  #24  
Old 03-10-2009, 03:06 PM
RainDodger RainDodger is offline
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Actually, I never said that I thought it would hurt a 1911 because I don't know. I just don't think it's a good practice. Merely my opinion. I do however, dry fire a Smith & Wesson revolver that has a floating firing pin. The revolver was purchased new by my father in 1954 and I learned trigger control by dry firing it. It's been dry fired thousands upon thousands of times with no detrimental effects. I just don't feel good about dry firing a semi auto. Thinking logically, you're right - it should not hurt anything because the firing pin spring would keep the wider part of the firing pin from striking the back side of the breech face. I just grew up with a father (former Army Ordnance Officer) that told me not to make a habit of it.
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  #25  
Old 03-10-2009, 04:38 PM
DevilDave1911 DevilDave1911 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by leftnose View Post
Hi All,

I was reading through the manual for my new Custom Target II and I noticed something interesting. Kimber does not recommend easing the hammer forward to de-cock as it can alter the sear interface. Instead, the recommend dry firing the gun. Of course, dry firing has its own set of issues.

Which do you guys do? Ease the hammer down by hand or dry fire?
um, no issues whatsoever with dryfiring, and I can't even figure out a reason to decock a 1911.
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