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  #1  
Old 02-22-2009, 08:50 AM
TJS500 TJS500 is offline
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.223 vs .243 vs .270 winchester




I would like to know the merits of these three rounds. I have experience with the 5.56 in the M-16 (none combat) while serving in the Army but would like to know how it compares to the others. For hunting deer sized game. Ballistics, availability, costs, ect..

This forum has been my go to place for info such as this. I know it is a 1911 forum but there are many people here that have more experience then I and I respect their opinions. Thanks in advance.

Todd
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  #2  
Old 02-22-2009, 09:08 AM
MSgt Dotson MSgt Dotson is offline
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Many use the .243 effectively for deer every season, choosing their shots, and using the quality 100-117 gr bullets available, bring meat to the table every year. No argument here.

But, IMO, it is not the ideal whitetail round, but, a very nice compromise/dual purpose round, suitable for both varmints *and* adequate for whitetails (at up to 200-250 yards) with the right bullet.

Great whitetail rounds are, IMO, the 7mm-08, .308, and, of course, the .30-06, .270 Win, and .280 Rem. (all of the above are usually at/near the classic desired min 2000 fps and 1000 ft/lbs ME at 400 yards) (Usually, all of teh above are well stocked at Wal mart and/or any gun store across America)

With the right bullets, any of the calibers listed is (can be) effective out to 400+ yards in skilled hands.
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  #3  
Old 02-22-2009, 09:20 AM
Tx1911 Tx1911 is offline
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re:

+2 on what Dotson said. I use the 308 in Texas. Alot of peeps use the 243 here very effectively, shot placement is key IMHO. The 223/5.56, shots 100 yds or less, for a beginner ( women, small child ) and picking the right ammo also helps.
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  #4  
Old 02-22-2009, 09:26 AM
MSgt Dotson MSgt Dotson is offline
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The .223 can even be used on S.C. whitetails with the right bullets, with many/most sub-100 lbs...(Perhaps there, in my original home state, the .243 might be ideal!)
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  #5  
Old 02-23-2009, 03:35 PM
Andy Andy is offline
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The .243 is the absolute minimum for general white-tail deer-hunting. The .270 Win. with 130-gr. would be better.

The .223 is more of a coyote/varmint round, and definitely not the ideal anti-personnel round. The 7.62x39mm is my idea of what chambering the AR15 should be in. That would work for deer, too. although the 6.5 Grendel would be a great cartridge, cost and availability make it a distant second to the 7.62x39mm.

Regards,
Andy
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  #6  
Old 02-23-2009, 03:40 PM
Ridge Ridge is offline
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223 - not a whitetail round.
243 - works in experienced hands.
270 - good all around round.

My personal favorite deer cartridge is the 7mm-08.
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  #7  
Old 02-23-2009, 05:57 PM
TJS500 TJS500 is offline
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Thanks guys for the info.

How does the .270 compare to 308 or 30-06 for range and trajectory? How about cost?
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  #8  
Old 02-23-2009, 07:00 PM
pabovine pabovine is offline
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For TN whitetail
270 -more than enough
243-plenty
223-haven't tried, but since it has become legal, I might try given I am looking at maybe 150 yrds distance max.
30-06 and 270 have a flatter trajectory for the long shots, however all three are known for great accuracy in reloads.

Last edited by pabovine; 02-23-2009 at 07:02 PM. Reason: forgot info for last post
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  #9  
Old 02-23-2009, 09:59 PM
sevenplusone sevenplusone is offline
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.270's are pretty flat shooting compared to most common deer cartridges. My dad has gotten dozens of Michigan whitetail over the year with his Ruger M77 in .270. It's essentially a necked down 30-06 and is quite readily available. Not a bad all-around hunting cartridge.
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  #10  
Old 02-23-2009, 10:37 PM
ACRIMSONTIDE ACRIMSONTIDE is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy View Post
The .243 is the absolute minimum for general white-tail deer-hunting. The .270 Win. with 130-gr. would be better.

The .223 is more of a coyote/varmint round, and definitely not the ideal anti-personnel round. The 7.62x39mm is my idea of what chambering the AR15 should be in. That would work for deer, too. although the 6.5 Grendel would be a great cartridge, cost and availability make it a distant second to the 7.62x39mm.

Regards,
Andy
A 6.5 Grendel is not a good round for deer. Only marginally better tfor deer than the .223. Please do not take my word for it, contact the developers of the 6.5 Grendel and they will likely tell you the same thing. It is a very accurate round and it will take small deer, as in doe sized deer, but it is not effective on large whitetails unless the shot is absolutely perfectly placed, with almost no margin for error.
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  #11  
Old 02-24-2009, 09:47 AM
pendennis pendennis is offline
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The .243 is a hot little number, but as others have mentioned, it's a marginal cartridge for deer. You need exact placement to insure a clean kill.

The .270 is about as versatile as you can get, second only to a .30-06.

The .243 is a great varmint cartridge, but the down side is that they tend to erode barrel throats very quickly. You have to put a lot of rounds through a .243 for this to happen, but it is a concern. I owned a Rem 700 varmint in .243, and a gunsmith diagnosed some erosion after about 1000 rounds.

The .243 is typical of cartridges with high powder capacity, pushing a small-diameter round.

Best,
Dennis
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  #12  
Old 02-24-2009, 12:19 PM
jfrey jfrey is offline
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Just my 2 cents worth:
.223 is fair for varmits but a .220 Swift does much better.
.243 is poor on deer, a .257 Roberts is a much better round.
.270 is great for deer in all parts of the country, if you don't own a 30.06.
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  #13  
Old 02-26-2009, 09:45 PM
James_Joshua James_Joshua is offline
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I've gone deer hunting for years with a .270. I hit the mother load when I found out about the ballistic tip bullets. AMAZING. The bullet goes into the lung cavity and literally explodes. This breaks the back and drops the deer on spot.
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  #14  
Old 02-28-2009, 08:52 AM
GregM GregM is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MSgt Dotson View Post
Many use the .243 effectively for deer every season, choosing their shots, and using the quality 100-117 gr bullets available, bring meat to the table every year. No argument here.

But, IMO, it is not the ideal whitetail round, but, a very nice compromise/dual purpose round, suitable for both varmints *and* adequate for whitetails (at up to 200-250 yards) with the right bullet.

Great whitetail rounds are, IMO, the 7mm-08, .308, and, of course, the .30-06, .270 Win, and .280 Rem. (all of the above are usually at/near the classic desired min 2000 fps and 1000 ft/lbs ME at 400 yards) (Usually, all of teh above are well stocked at Wal mart and/or any gun store across America)

With the right bullets, any of the calibers listed is (can be) effective out to 400+ yards in skilled hands.
Minor point, the 100-117 range you mention is for .257 bullets not .243 (they typically max out at ~100-105 gr.). The 117 or 120 grain bullets are classic loadings for the 25-06 and 257 Roberts. The 250-3000 tends to be loaded w/ 100 gr. bullets for deer hunting.

As to the balance of your posting, VERY WELL SAID AND VERY SAGE ADVICE. The 25's are better choices for deer hunting than the 6mm's (243) IMO. Slightly heavier and larger at comparable velocities; not much, but it makes for a little extra.
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  #15  
Old 02-28-2009, 09:30 AM
JerryM JerryM is offline
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I have killed deer with a .243, .270, and 7MM Mag here is NM. I have a friend who has killed over 50 with the .243 since it is the only rifle he has. He is perfectly satisfied with it and his handloads.
As an aside, while the 6mm Rem is in theory a better cartridge most factory rifles use a short action which limits the oal, and I find I get more velocity with the .243 than I do with the 6mm Rem.

I have had a greater percentage of one shot in the tracks kills with the .243 than any other cartridge. The secret is good loads plus shot placement. I used only my handloads which do exceed the factory rounds. I won't quote my loads, but the 100 gr bullets exceed 3100 fps. In spite of handbooks the load with 4350 is not excessive and the cases last several loadings before I have to FLRS. I am talking about average size mule deer, so I am not sure why it would not be as effective on whitetails.

I have also killed 2 antelope at slightly over 500 yards with that load. I paced it with long strides that measure almost exactly 36 inches so it is not off the top of my head. I never lost a deer or antelope with it.

Having said that if I had only one rifle for everything in the US it would be a 30-06. Second choice would be a .270. Since I am not limited to one rifle I prefer the .270 over the 30-06 for my use.

I might add that I do not hunt anymore. Age catches up with each of us.

Regards,
Jerry
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  #16  
Old 03-01-2009, 03:02 PM
JRI JRI is offline
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X x x

Lets see if I got this right on the X designation on the 5.56 ammo:

XM-193 = experimental ammunition.

XM-193 = ammunition that failed quality control

XM-193 = extra ammunition from a production run.

XM-193 = ammunition for adults only.

I think it safe to say that Federal is the only one who knows what their alphabet soup of designations stand for. I did see another post somewhere that quoted a Federal source as stating that the letter designation simply referenced the way the ammunition was packed. i.e. box, strip, bulk.

I find it hard to comprehend that any manufacturer of ammunition would offer factory seconds for sale without VERY CLEARLY marking it as such and if it was not marked the attached liability release should tip you off.

Last edited by JRI; 03-01-2009 at 03:05 PM.
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  #17  
Old 03-01-2009, 06:38 PM
ACRIMSONTIDE ACRIMSONTIDE is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JRI View Post
I find it hard to comprehend that any manufacturer of ammunition would offer factory seconds for sale without VERY CLEARLY marking it as such and if it was not marked the attached liability release should tip you off.
I agree with you on that. With the current "litigation craze" it's doubtful any manufacturer would take such a risk.
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  #18  
Old 03-01-2009, 08:32 PM
Handgun Guy Handgun Guy is offline
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My vote goes to the 270! You may want to check out the 270 Short....
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  #19  
Old 03-01-2009, 09:26 PM
lunyou lunyou is offline
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My opinion

I prefer .30 caliber bullets for my hunting. But I do have a .270 for deer.

My father in law swears by the speed of a .243 for deer, that was until he bought a .270 WSM. I am not a fan of a .243, I don't know why.

Now the .223 in my not so humble opinion is too small for whitetail. Yeah I know that many a whitetail have been killed by a .223 but not by me. My father in law also bought his daughter(my wife) and his step daughter both a New England Firearms .223 single shot. It is just not my cup of tea. It doesn't make a good clean kill.

I would say that the .270 is probably the 3rd most popular deer rifle behind the 30-06 and the 30-30. And probably the 2nd most popular throughout history for overall hunting in the USA behind the 30-06.

I do know that the .270 is the smallest caliber allowed by many African Safari groups for hunting African game.

lunyou
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  #20  
Old 03-01-2009, 09:31 PM
lunyou lunyou is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Handgun Guy View Post
My vote goes to the 270! You may want to check out the 270 Short....
You make a great suggestion. I have shot a deer and seen a few more killed with the .270 WSM. I will say that it is almost overkill on whitetailed deer, if you use the right bullets.

I shot a yearling at about 50 yards in the front of the neck. It was facing me. All-in-all it's neck was about 5 inches thick. The bullet never left the deer's neck. The bullet displace all the energy in that small amount of meat in that poor deer's neck. When I put him in the truck the area that was hit, was like rasberry jelly.

Definate overkill.

lunyou
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  #21  
Old 03-01-2009, 09:49 PM
pistolero1911 pistolero1911 is offline
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In my part of the country, where there really isn't any "wide open space" anymore, and deer are thick as ticks, my choices in descending order for a white tail hunting cartridge would be:

12 gauge deer slugs
30/30
.30-06
.270

Not only do we have to be concerned about the knock down qualities of the round, but also its potential to carry well beyond our field of vision in the event of a miss.
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