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  #1  
Old 03-13-2008, 04:19 PM
mike 45 mike 45 is offline
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combat commander




Are colt combat commander's all steel or did some come in the lightweight version ? I havent seen a lightweight one
Thanks
Mike
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  #2  
Old 03-13-2008, 04:25 PM
ElrodCod ElrodCod is offline
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If it's a Combat Commander it's steel.
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  #3  
Old 03-13-2008, 04:50 PM
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AZ Husker AZ Husker is offline
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Otherwise it's a "Lightweight Commander".
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  #4  
Old 03-13-2008, 05:13 PM
mike 45 mike 45 is offline
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Can lightweight commanders come with a blued frame aswell as slide
Thanks Mike
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  #5  
Old 03-13-2008, 05:36 PM
DocRob DocRob is offline
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The frame is anodized in a dark black-like finish while the slide is blued. I have seen some with a light grey anodized finish but the ones I've seen have a stainless steel frame.
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  #6  
Old 03-13-2008, 05:48 PM
mike 45 mike 45 is offline
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So i guess you cant blue aluminum Pity.
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  #7  
Old 03-13-2008, 06:17 PM
Chuck S Chuck S is offline
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Sure you can. Combat Commander sounded more hooah to Colts than Excessively Heavy Commander when they first came out.

There were Commanders and Combat Commanders for a long while after circa 1970. Folks started calling the Commander a lightweight Commander and finally Colt capitalized Lightweight and roll marked the slides accordingly.

All Commanders are alloy frame.
All Lightweight Commanders are alloy frame.
Lots of choices.

All Combat Commanders are steel frame.

-- Chuck
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  #8  
Old 03-13-2008, 10:41 PM
ACP.45.45.45 ACP.45.45.45 is offline
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So Combat Elite's should be excessively heavy Elite? Combat Government should be excessively heavy government? Heavy weights are used in Combat. You don't see lightweight Abrams or aircraft carriers do you. The Combat Commander is just that.......made for combat. I would not take an alloy frame over a steel one for longevity under combat conditions.. The Commander to me is a CCW weapon for non military application. Remember our venerable Colt 1911 was designed for combat and the Combat Commander is merely a slightly shortened model. Don't even think about demeaning my Combat Commander's with this excessive weight baloney! Sorry but you hit a nerve there.
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  #9  
Old 03-14-2008, 12:24 AM
DPris DPris is offline
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No, aluminum cannot be blued, if that's what you were asking.
Denis
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  #10  
Old 03-14-2008, 12:25 AM
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It's anodized.
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  #11  
Old 03-14-2008, 12:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chuck S View Post
All Commanders are alloy frame.
All Lightweight Commanders are alloy frame.
Lots of choices.

All Combat Commanders are steel frame.

-- Chuck
While technically true, you must not forget that there are a few factory mis-marked Commanders out there. I've seen lightweights with slides marked "Combat Commander" and vice versa. Heck, I once even had a pre-70 Government Model mis-marked "Commander Model" as well.
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  #12  
Old 03-14-2008, 12:59 AM
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Those must have been worth some collector's cash!
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  #13  
Old 03-14-2008, 01:57 AM
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Actually, while the "Govermander" I bought seemed cool at the time, it lost its novelty pretty quick so I sold it. I also had a bit of trouble finding a new buyer as well. It seems not all factory screwups are desirable, especially when it reminds folks of just how sloppy somebody like Colt can be.
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Try not to fall into the common trap of wanting to replace everything on your new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out, and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot it for at least 500 rounds, then decide what you don't like and want improved. Vintage 1911's should NEVER be refinished or modified because it ruins any value they had as a collectible firearm.
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  #14  
Old 03-14-2008, 04:00 AM
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Govermantor

haha.. I bet Arnold would buy it.
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  #15  
Old 03-14-2008, 06:44 AM
MSgt Dotson MSgt Dotson is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dsk View Post
Heck, I once even had a pre-70 Government Model mis-marked "Commander Model" as well.
I saw a stainless Offcer's ACP with a perfectly centered rollmark a few month's back; said...."Colt's Government Model"
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  #16  
Old 03-14-2008, 07:59 AM
JasperST4 JasperST4 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dsk View Post
While technically true, you must not forget that there are a few factory mis-marked Commanders out there. I've seen lightweights with slides marked "Combat Commander" and vice versa.
Is it possible that a Colt assembler mismatched the slide and frame?
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  #17  
Old 03-14-2008, 08:56 AM
Chuck S Chuck S is offline
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I saw a Dodge with Chrysler badges on one side once too. But in this case the dealer put a tarp over it pretty quick!

-- Chuck
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  #18  
Old 03-14-2008, 09:23 AM
avmech avmech is offline
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My 1991A1 Commander is labeled as just "Commander".................it has a steel frame (Aluminum is non magnetic....).
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  #19  
Old 03-14-2008, 11:08 AM
MSgt Dotson MSgt Dotson is offline
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Originally Posted by JasperST4 View Post
Is it possible that a Colt assembler mismatched the slide and frame?
It was definitely an otherwise stock mid-80's vintage pre-enhanced stainless OACP, identical to mine, but simply with the wrong rollmark...
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  #20  
Old 03-14-2008, 11:51 AM
tipoc tipoc is offline
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Quote:
The Combat Commander is just that.......made for combat.
The original Commanders were developed by Colt in 1948 with an alloy frame which was anodized blue (which some call blue/black) and a lightened slide. They were developed because the U.S. military was considering going to a lighter sidearm than the GM and phasing out the 1911. So Colt came up with the Commander in an alloy frame, which was meant for combat. The military never adopted them though.

When the military decided, due to expense, not to swap out the 1911 Colt had a new gun. In the 70s Colt introduced it's steel frame version and called it the Combat Commander which was never intended for the military market and never adopted by any military branch. The name did emphasize that the frame was more rugged than the alloy frame (there were complaints that the alloy frames cracked) and Colt knew that if you called it "Combat" more would be sold. Marketing.

Call some "Combat Elite" and even more will be sold.

Call it "Combat Tactical Elite" and many more will be sold.

S&W used to name their guns. The Model 19 was first called the "Combat Magnum" even though it had adjustable sights and most combat sidearms have fixed sights. But it sold more guns and sounds better than M19.

tipoc

Last edited by tipoc; 03-14-2008 at 11:54 AM.
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  #21  
Old 03-14-2008, 02:34 PM
ACP.45.45.45 ACP.45.45.45 is offline
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Agreed that the COMBAT moniker is madison avenue( I still like it) and I did not know that about the development of the lw,I guess I am a little sensitive about my Colt's, my car, my kids and my wife. No apologies though, just expect a reaction from me if you choose to denigrate them!!








Quote:
Originally Posted by tipoc View Post
The original Commanders were developed by Colt in 1948 with an alloy frame which was anodized blue (which some call blue/black) and a lightened slide. They were developed because the U.S. military was considering going to a lighter sidearm than the GM and phasing out the 1911. So Colt came up with the Commander in an alloy frame, which was meant for combat. The military never adopted them though.

When the military decided, due to expense, not to swap out the 1911 Colt had a new gun. In the 70s Colt introduced it's steel frame version and called it the Combat Commander which was never intended for the military market and never adopted by any military branch. The name did emphasize that the frame was more rugged than the alloy frame (there were complaints that the alloy frames cracked) and Colt knew that if you called it "Combat" more would be sold. Marketing.

Call some "Combat Elite" and even more will be sold.

Call it "Combat Tactical Elite" and many more will be sold.

S&W used to name their guns. The Model 19 was first called the "Combat Magnum" even though it had adjustable sights and most combat sidearms have fixed sights. But it sold more guns and sounds better than M19.

tipoc
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  #22  
Old 03-14-2008, 04:57 PM
JasperST4 JasperST4 is offline
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I noticed that "Colts" came first.
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  #23  
Old 03-14-2008, 09:45 PM
ACP.45.45.45 ACP.45.45.45 is offline
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Oops, I better not let my car see this thread!
Thanks for pointing that out!




Quote:
Originally Posted by JasperST4 View Post
I noticed that "Colts" came first.
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  #24  
Old 03-16-2008, 02:34 PM
Superpumper Superpumper is offline
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Mine is marked.......

Quote:
Originally Posted by avmech View Post
My 1991A1 Commander is labeled as just "Commander".................it has a steel frame (Aluminum is non magnetic....).

COLT'S
COMMANDER MODEL
.45 AUTOMATIC CALIBER

The font on the bottom is a bit smaller so the lines are equal length. I just received my gun a week ago Monday. It is all carbon steel with a blue finish.
On the right side of the slide its marked:

SERIES 80


The gun is model # 04691. I am pleased with it, although I would have prefered a beavertail grip saftey, and undercut trigger guard/frontstrap intersection. But I didn't have the $ at the time for an XSE, and I wanted another pistol in the house before I sent my Les Baer back to Baer for fixing. I can always add those parts/work to the gun later, if I want.

All in all, I am very happy with the Colt. It is the first one I've owned, and I am impressed with the gun. about 300 rounds in my first range trip with one failure at around round 75-80. All brands of ammo 3, and magazines 3 worked fine. My one quibble is the rear sight seems a tiny bit loose, but I am going to swap those for a set of Novak lo mount with tritium any way.
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