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  #1  
Old 08-14-2007, 04:56 PM
Cooperd0g Cooperd0g is offline
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Blueing vs Black Oxide




Robar's website says the black oxide is also known as blueing, but I have seen older blued revolvers and they do not look and feel like my black oxide coated Kimber Custom II. What gives?
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  #2  
Old 08-14-2007, 05:07 PM
watchin watchin is offline
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Blueing is a black oxidation. I guess you can call it black oxide that is produced from a chemical process. The finish that you get will depend on the smoothness of the surface of the metal and also the composition of the metal. Some bluing ( like Colt's early DeLuxe Blue )was mirror polished steel that had a certain chemical formula that made an almost mirror shiny blue/black. I think that is what most people think of when they hear about bluing. Today that same blued finish is more of a matte black. It is due to the chemicals used and the finish on the gun before it is exposed to these chemicals. There is also the old process called rust bluing that produces a blue/black finish (different than heated salt bluing). All the bluing processes produce and oxide coating on the steel.
-watchin-
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Old 08-14-2007, 06:11 PM
Dave Berryhill Dave Berryhill is offline
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There have been many forms of "bluing" over the years. Black oxide is what is used by most manufacturers and refinishers these days. There are a few exceptions - Doug Turnbull still does carbonia bluing and many high end shotguns are rust blued.

Black oxide will show the surface finish of the steel so the surface must be prepped prior to applying the black oxide. The black oxide itself doesn't give a matte finish. If you polish the steel first then you'll have a polished blue/black oxide finish. If you blast the steel with glass beads or other media then you get a matte blue finish.
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  #4  
Old 08-14-2007, 06:50 PM
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RickB RickB is offline
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The army was calling bluing "oxide", to distinguish it from the parkerized "phosphate" coating, during WWI. You'll still get an argument about what constitutes "black oxide", but modern bluing is an oxide treatment that's black, ergo, black oxide.
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Old 08-14-2007, 07:06 PM
kgbeast kgbeast is offline
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Kimber Custom is either polished blue or KimProII (baked on finish). Black oxide finish found on guns specified as black oxide is not polished thinner finish (shows imperfections in the steel) but still the same stuff. Blueing is basically a "gloryfied" rust finish, that is why rust removers will also remove blueing. In case of older weapons (Mosin Nagant M44 for instance) or some tradidtional new weapons such as Kimber Pro, the process of bluing is longer, more involving, and performed at higher temperatures producing thicker oxidation level which later is buffed-up shiny to make it look more uniform which looks like laquer. After buffing it and polishing, while it looks times better than "black-oxide", it is just as touchy and thin (in my opinion)
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Old 08-14-2007, 08:54 PM
Cooperd0g Cooperd0g is offline
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Okay, thanks. I have an engraving on my 1911. I was planning on doing a little work on it and figured that I would get it refinished so everything matched. I asked the guys at Kimber and they told me that due to the fine lines of the engraving any thicker finish like their KimPro, Roguard, or Black T would fill in the lines so that the engraving wouldn't be visible. I have to get the frame refinished at a minimum because I want the front strap checkered so I guess I'll just get the replacement parts finished the same way.
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Old 08-14-2007, 10:29 PM
Dave Berryhill Dave Berryhill is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RickB
...You'll still get an argument about what constitutes "black oxide", but modern bluing is an oxide treatment that's black, ergo, black oxide.
I'm not sure what there is to argue about. Industrial black oxide for steel is a pretty standard process used for everything from nuts and bolts to firearms. In fact, it's so standard that most of the major suppliers of the chemicals for black oxide meet the military standard for this finish, MIL-C-13924C, including Du-Lite, Hubbard-Hall, Heatbath, Brownells and others. It's a completely different type of finish than parkerizing or phosphating.

With the exception of rust blued shotguns and a couple of premium handguns that get carbonia blueing (such as Colt's WWI 1911 reproduction), just about every firearms manufacturer who produces "blued" firearms uses black oxide.

Like I said before, there are other forms of "bluing" but black oxide is what is commonly used today. Even the high gloss blue found on Colt Pythons is black oxide.
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Last edited by Dave Berryhill; 08-14-2007 at 10:49 PM.
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  #8  
Old 08-15-2007, 02:24 PM
Metaloy Ind. Metaloy Ind. is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Berryhill
I'm not sure what there is to argue about. Industrial black oxide for steel is a pretty standard process used for everything from nuts and bolts to firearms. In fact, it's so standard that most of the major suppliers of the chemicals for black oxide meet the military standard for this finish, MIL-C-13924C, including Du-Lite, Hubbard-Hall, Heatbath, Brownells and others. It's a completely different type of finish than parkerizing or phosphating.

With the exception of rust blued shotguns and a couple of premium handguns that get carbonia blueing (such as Colt's WWI 1911 reproduction), just about every firearms manufacturer who produces "blued" firearms uses black oxide.

Like I said before, there are other forms of "bluing" but black oxide is what is commonly used today. Even the high gloss blue found on Colt Pythons is black oxide.
+1

The word oxide means 'oxidation'...rust. Blueing and black oxide is controlled rust.

It is difficult to explain this to people that think they are two different things.
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Old 08-15-2007, 08:27 PM
1saxman 1saxman is offline
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Guys; it's 'Carbona'. I know most people call it 'Carbonia' (like some coal town, maybe?) but it's 'Carbona'. Go to Turnbull's site if you don't believe me.
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