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  #1  
Old 12-07-2006, 12:05 AM
razorhunter razorhunter is offline
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Advice on Lowering/Flaring Ejecting Port...




Guys,
I want to lower and possibly flare? my ejection port on my SA GI .45.

Here's a few questions.

1. First off, Yost Bonitz (I think) has "Lower AND Flare" Ejection port on their site. What does "flare" mean? I'm assuming it means to possibly bevel the outer edge of the ejection port? Would this mean to bevel it all the way around, or just on the sides or bottom, or what? Is the perimeter of the INSIDE edge supposed to beveled?

2. How can I determine exactly how much to mill out? I'm assuming the majority of the metal removed, will be from the bottom edge. Is there any metal to be removed from the SIDES?
I'm just trying to determine how to lay this thing out, and how much to mill out. I'm also assuming that the least amount of milling, will be done to the rearward side, as too much would expose the end of the barrel...

3. What kind of steel is the slide made of? Standard carbon steel? Just trying to determine if a HSS end mill should be used, and at what speed would be best. Type of steel would help me decide.

4. I know the parkerizing will be removed when I do this, so I'm assuming the entire slide will have to be re-parked. Is this correct, or can it be somehow "touched up"?? Is SA the best place to send it for re-parkerizing or what??

Thanks for any help guys. I know it's a simple milling job, but I just wanted to clear a few things up, and make sure not to take any chances by guessing...
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  #2  
Old 12-07-2006, 08:08 AM
hooks hooks is offline
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This is what a lowered and flared ejection port looks like. The port itself is lowered along the lower edge to a specified dimension.. and the internal edge is chamfered. The flare is the teardrop cut. See here for milling instructions..http://www.blindhogg.com/gunsmith/ejectionport.html
BlindHoggs data says to lower the port to .450, some lower them more than that.The .450 dimension is from the lower horizontal edge of the port to the bottom of the slide. I've seen some different techniques for flaring the port so it's kind of subjective but, must not be milled so deep as to interfere with the extractor tunnel...Check with a gunsmith or maybe some of the members and Pros here can add some data for the angle of the flare and a tolerance for the lowered edge of the port.



Last edited by hooks; 12-07-2006 at 10:47 AM.
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  #3  
Old 12-07-2006, 03:54 PM
rjd rjd is offline
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I am very new to customizing 1911's, but in regards to the picture that you posted, is the openig of the ejection port suppose to cut into the locking mechanism of the pistol. The first groove on the barrel where it locks into the slide is visible. I think the smith that did the work took off a little too much material near the front of the port.

Just an observation and my opinion, I am a newbie so I could be wrong. Anyone with more experience, I would like to hear your opinion.

Thanks,
rjd
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  #4  
Old 12-07-2006, 04:05 PM
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Black_Talon Black_Talon is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rjd
I am very new to customizing 1911's, but in regards to the picture that you posted, is the openig of the ejection port suppose to cut into the locking mechanism of the pistol. The first groove on the barrel where it locks into the slide is visible. I think the smith that did the work took off a little too much material near the front of the port.

Thanks,
rjd
That's done deliberately by some gunsmiths to facilitate the ejection of live FMJ rounds from the gun. With an extended ejector, many 1911's don't have enough clearance in the ejection port to accomplish this.


EDIT:

They also don't need to be cut so deep as the one above. Here's one:
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Last edited by Black_Talon; 12-07-2006 at 04:20 PM.
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  #5  
Old 12-07-2006, 05:22 PM
razorhunter razorhunter is offline
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SWEET guys!
I don't have time to read the milling instructions linked above, but I will DEFINITELY be reading them later tonight.
I have not done milling such as this before. I've only done square milling, and taking a part down to a certain thickness.
I think with a little research, I could possibly handle this, as long as I determine how that flaring is done on the mill???
Seems difficult just thinking about it, but maybe I'll figure it out...
More to come.
Keep the replies coming guys!!!
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  #6  
Old 12-07-2006, 05:55 PM
hooks hooks is offline
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The flaring is a little more tricky if you are milling this onto your pistol. This involves positioning the slide or the mill at an angle. IE: tilting the head of the mill or clamping the slide at an angle. Kind of tricky but not hard.

I would suggest doing this with a dremel tool by hand(Uh, ohhhh) if you feel confident enough. Look at some examples and get yourself the correct grinding bits so it looks and functions right. It's all in what you feel comfortable doing. Just be carefull and protect surfaces that can be damaged by a slip up.

FWIW, milling the flare onto your slide takes a lot of polishing and hand finishing out of the process. Minimal clean up to make it look great. Grinding will require some polishing to finish off. I don't know what your experience level is but a good gunsmith would probably do this for around $25.

Last edited by hooks; 12-07-2006 at 06:08 PM.
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  #7  
Old 12-07-2006, 07:11 PM
Bob Brown Bob Brown is offline
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The height of a Gold Cup's ejection port rail is .475". Lots of us lower it to .450 and some even to .430.
Take a look at the bevel on the inside of the port's lower edge. When you finish your straight cut, you can duplicate that with a Dremel and stone...then polishing.
The flair is easily done with a Dremel and stone if you don't want to fight the setup.
And when you're done you can touchup with some cold blue.

Bob
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  #8  
Old 12-07-2006, 08:33 PM
razorhunter razorhunter is offline
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Would you guys recommend the 1/4" sanding drums or maybe even 3/8" sanding drums on the dremel??
I've done quite a bit of this type thing, on framelock folders (knives), where the relief area is cut into the lockbar itself. usually on the bottom of the lockbar, on the inside or sometimes the outside as well.
I've ONLY been able to make the sanding drums work though. I've simply NEVER had ANY luck grinding metal away, with ANY dremel attachment other than the sanding drums. Granted, they burn up fairly quick, but they are cheap and get the job done.
What do you guys recommend to POLISH the area afterwards? Just regular sandpaper and elbow grease??? I assume 400 grit or maybe 600 would be all that's needed? How in the world could I polish out the recessed "flared" area, without completely blunting over the edges and messing them up by the use of hand sanding?? Just trying to determine best way to polish a recess such as this "flared" area????

AWESOME info guys. THANKS!!
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  #9  
Old 12-07-2006, 08:50 PM
Bob Brown Bob Brown is offline
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Sanding drums would take forever, and lots of refills. I use a grinding stone to make the initial cut and then finish with the Dremel and varying grits of cratex. If a high shine is needed, then I finish with jeweler's rouge. If you're reasonably careful, you will not overrun the sharp edges of the flair.

Bob
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  #10  
Old 12-07-2006, 09:23 PM
UnSafe UnSafe is offline
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I can't recall where I read it, but when hand grinding the flare into the ejection port, I've used a B42 stone. Works well, buy several so you'll have a fresh one for the final passes..

Slow & steady
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  #11  
Old 12-07-2006, 10:43 PM
hooks hooks is offline
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here are some pictures that might help...








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  #12  
Old 12-07-2006, 11:59 PM
razorhunter razorhunter is offline
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Hey hooks,
NICE pics!
BTW,
Third pic down, WHAT is that piece that the slide appears to be sitting on/mounted to? Is that some type of jig, with slots milled in it for different angles?? I'm having a hard time guessing what that is!
Please do tell! More pics of your setup please!!! You rock bro!
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  #13  
Old 12-08-2006, 08:05 AM
hooks hooks is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by razorhunter
Hey hooks,
NICE pics!
BTW,
Third pic down, WHAT is that piece that the slide appears to be sitting on/mounted to? Is that some type of jig, with slots milled in it for different angles?? I'm having a hard time guessing what that is!
Please do tell! More pics of your setup please!!! You rock bro!


Those aren't my pics I found them searching the internet a while back and remembered them. I can't really vouch for the 3rd pic for accuracy since I didn't actually do the grinding. You will have to proceed carefully. I machined my flare and port in a mill. The slide is mounted to a Yavapi slide holder. The jig can be purchased from Brownells for around $90. You can do several different setups with this jig. Very handy.

For machining the port, I used the Yavapi slide holder and for the flare I set up the slide at an angle in a mill vice and used a ball end mill. Hope this helps.

Last edited by hooks; 12-08-2006 at 08:09 AM.
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